17 U.S. Code § 107 - Limitations on exclusive rights: Fair use
Notwithstanding the provisions of sections 106 and 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phonorecords or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright. In determining whether the use made of a work in any particular case is a fair use the factors to be considered shall include—
(1) the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for nonprofit educational purposes [all mirrored content falls under this clause, any ads present are mirrored from the original site, mirrored content earns me no revenue whatsoever];
(2) the nature of the copyrighted work [this is a unique resource for the mentally ill, and preservation of it can be argued to be incredibly important];
(3) the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole; and
(4) the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work. [absolutely none whatsoever, as the original work no longer exists anywhere else (outside of whatever bits and pieces archive.org managed to capture) - the original site was intermittantly completely unavailable for a extended period of time before its SSL certificate expired (and was never renewed), and eventually the site went offline for good, then finally the DNS records were removed at some point prior to May 2018, so at this point it is well beyond the 'dead and rotting' stage]
The fact that a work is unpublished shall not itself bar a finding of fair use if such finding is made upon consideration of all the above factors.

This domain is not controlled by Jerod Poore, and I will NOT continue redirecting traffic from this domain to crazymeds.us [as I formerly did] while Jerod continues with his immature temper tantrum over adblock or continues to fail to maintain his site, fucking over his entire community and countless visitors in the process. [belated clarification: with specific regards to the adblock drama I was referring to Poore at one point replacing his entire site with a single page complaining about the amount of revenue lost to users with ad blocking active, which is something that I took extreme exception to because this affected ALL visitors to the site regardless of if or if not they were actually using ad blocking]
This mirror is unfortunately incomplete (and very slightly outdated), as /CrazyTalk/ was not included when I scraped the site (it was far too large to scrape given the site's extremely poor performance, my wish to avoid worsening the poor performance further, and other factors). If you're looking for a replacement forum, I suggest visiting https://www.crazyboards.org/forums/. There are issues with many of the mirrored pages, I am working on identifying and fixing them, but I do not have the time to address every single issue at this moment (although by now the majority of these issues have been resolved). Dynamic content is obviously completely broken (this is beyond my control), and the loss of /CrazyTalk/ is quite bad given how much good user-generated info was on there, but you have Jerod to "thank" for that. Maybe I'll bring it back online at some point, but it wouldn't be the same as before. For now, I suggest visiting CrazyBoards instead.
Note (Oct 9 2018): Infrequent additional updates regarding the status of this site will be posted on https://info.crazymeds.net


Sources.Bibliography History

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2015-09-02 by JerodPoore -
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* [[http://www.chemspider.com/|ChemSpider]] Close to, maybe even everything you ever wanted to know about the active ingredient in a med.  It's all about the patentable molecules.
to:
* Between the two of them [[http://www.drugbank.ca/|DrugBank]] & [[http://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/|PubChem]] should have close to, maybe even everything you ever wanted to know in the way of technical specs about the active ingredient in a med.
** Or at least links to other places with the data they don't have.
**
It's all about the patentable molecules.
2015-09-02 by JerodPoore -
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* [[Cite:http://www.preskorn.com/|Sheldon Preskorn’s Applied Clinical Psychopharmacology www.preskorn.com]] Sheldon Preskorn M.D.
to:
* [[Cite:http://www.preskorn.com/|Sheldon Preskorn’s Applied Clinical Psychopharmacology]] Sheldon Preskorn M.D.
2015-09-02 by JerodPoore -
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* [[http://www.psychotropical.com/|PsychoTropical Research (PTR)]] - Think of Dr. Gillman as an Australian version of Dr. Preskorn.
** I don't find his papers as accessible as Dr. Preskorn's, but he covers ''a lot'' more than ADs.
Added lines 124-126:
** [[https://www.ebi.ac.uk/chembl/|Bioactive data for drug discovery (ChEMBL)]]
** [[http://www.chemicalize.org/|ChemAxon]]
** [[http://www.ebi.ac.uk/chebi/|Chemical Entities of Biological Interest (ChEBI)]]
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** [[http://www.kegg.jp/kegg/drug/|Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) Drug Database]]
** [[http://www.pharmgkb.org/|PharmGKB -  Pharmacogenomics Knowledge Database]]
Changed lines 134-137 from:
** [[http://www.pharmgkb.org/|PharmGKB]]
** Many, but far from all countries have an equivalent to the FDA that has an online presence.  Of those who do not all of them have a searchable database of available medications[^##search^].  But I've found many throughout Europe, South America, and even a couple in Asia.
*** These sites are often the sources of the SPCs and PILs from across the world as well.
** The official websites of medications or pharmaceutical companies in different countries.  Janssen-Cilag's sites, when not restricted to medical professionals who have accounts that verify their credentials, can be especially helpful with this sort of thing.  Or completely content-free.
to:
** [[http://zinc.docking.org/|UCSF's ZINC database]]
* Many, but far from all countries have an equivalent to the FDA that has an online presence.  Of those who do not all of them have a searchable database of available medications[^##search^].  But I've found many throughout Europe, South America, and even a couple in Asia.
** These sites are often the sources of the SPCs and PILs from across the world as well.
* The official websites of medications or pharmaceutical companies in different countries.  Janssen-Cilag's sites, when not restricted to medical professionals who have accounts that verify their credentials, can be especially helpful with this sort of thing.  Or completely content-free.
2015-06-16 by JerodPoore -
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* [[http://www.ahrq.gov/research/findings/evidence-based-reports/index.html|The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Evidence-Based Reports]].  Similar to the Cochrane Database above, this is a collection of free eBooks published by the AHRQ, which is part of the US Department of Health and Human Services.  Each book is a systemic review of hundreds of studies on a particular subject.
Changed lines 207-208 from:
* Trisha Greenhalgh of ''The BMJ'' has written [[http://www.bmj.com/about-bmj/resources-readers/publications/how-read-paper|several articles about how to read and interpret research papers]].
to:
* Prof. Trisha Greenhalgh of ''The BMJ'' has written [[http://www.bmj.com/about-bmj/resources-readers/publications/how-read-paper|several articles about how to read and interpret research papers]].
** She's published [[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/1118800966|a much more recent version in book form]] if you're ''really serious'' about doing biomedical research
.
Added lines 211-216:
!!!!Only the Best Evidence will Do
With all the controversy over the peer-review process of late, the one shining light in the whole mess is the rise of Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM).  So if you're looking to do the sort of serious research I do[^##medschool^], the sites you need to frequent:
* [[http://www.cebm.net/category/ebm-resources/|The Center for Evidence-Based Medicine]] has all sorts of resources for you.
* There are also a bunch of tools and other resources for EBM at [[http://researchguides.uic.edu/c.php?g=252338&p=1683347|University of Illinois at Chicago Library's Guide to Evidence-Based Medicine]].
[^##medschool Or you are now, or plan to be in med school. ^]

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2015-06-16 by JerodPoore -
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* [[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/index.php|Neurotransmitter.net]] Tons of information and research on psychiatric and neurological conditions, the drugs that treat them, the rating scales used to measure the efficacy of said drugs, and much, much more.  All neatly indexed and categorized to make it easy to make sense of a bunch of diverse information. I had no idea [[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/hangover.html|how much research was being done on hangovers]] until I hit this site.  I knew doctors liked to party (considering that my stepfather is a vascular surgeon I had a first-hand look at how much doctors liked to party), but who knew they were getting grant money for it?  A key site for patients, students and, most importantly, doctors of all stripes, shapes and sizes.[[<<]]
Must-read sections include:
** [[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/drug_reference.html|Drug Reference for FDA Approved Psychiatric Drugs @ Neurotransmitter.net]]
*** as well as [[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/epilepsy_drug_reference.html|AEDs]], [[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/migraine_drug_reference.html|meds for migraines]], [[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/parkinsons_drug_reference.html|Parkinson's]], and [[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/alzheimers_drug_reference.html|Alzheimer's]].
** The Disorders Research pages, such as the [[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/bipolar.html|bipolar disorder research index]]
** Neuroscience Research pages, such as the [[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/serotoninindex.html|serotonin research index]]
** Not only that, Shawn has [[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/biology_links.html|links to tons of other sites offering free full-text papers]] including:
*** [[http://highwire.stanford.edu/lists/freeart.dtl|Standford University's Highwire]] over 2 million papers available.
*** [[http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/collection|''Science'' magazine's collections]]. Of special interest to us - under Life Sciences - are their collections of papers on
**** [[http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/collection/neuroscience|Neruoscience]]
**** [[http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/collection/pharm_tox|Pharmacology & Toxicology]] the fearmongers must love that common pairing
*** [[http://arrowsmith.psych.uic.edu/arrowsmith_uic/tools.html|And a bunch of tools to make mining The Literature easier]]
* [[Cite:http://www.preskorn.com/|Sheldon Preskorn’s Applied Clinical Psychopharmacology www.preskorn.com M.D. Chief Executive Officer of the Clinical Research Institute and a Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Kansas School of Medicine - Wichita]]
** Dr. Preskorn has authored over 300 scientific and professional articles, and many of them are available at this site, which is full of useful psychopharmacological data involving drug-drug interactions, methods of actions, clinical efficacies, pharmacokinetics and more written in a fairly accessible way.  Dr. Preskorn has received continuous grant funding since 1978 for studies in the areas of psychopharmacology, neuroscience, and psychiatric illnesses.  While most of the articles are at least ten years old, Dr. Preskorn is still publishing papers, so we might be seeing new material eventually.  Regardless, he covers the basics of psychopharmacology in a way that makes sense, and the basics haven't changed much.
to:
* [[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/index.php|Neurotransmitter.net]] Tons of information and research on psychiatric and neurological conditions, the drugs that treat them, the rating scales used to measure the efficacy of said drugs, and much, much more.
** All neatly indexed and categorized to make it easy to make sense of a bunch of diverse information.
**
I had no idea [[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/hangover.html|how much research was being done on hangovers]] until I hit this site. 
***
I knew doctors liked to party (considering that my stepfather is a vascular surgeon I had a first-hand look at how much doctors liked to party), but who knew they were getting grant money for it? 
**
A key site for patients, students and, most importantly, doctors of all stripes, shapes and sizes.
** Must-read sections include:
*** [[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/drug_reference.html|Drug Reference for FDA Approved Psychiatric Drugs @ Neurotransmitter.net]]
**** as well as [[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/epilepsy_drug_reference.html|AEDs]], [[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/migraine_drug_reference.html|meds for migraines]], [[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/parkinsons_drug_reference.html|Parkinson's]], and [[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/alzheimers_drug_reference.html|Alzheimer's]].
*** The Disorders Research pages, such as the [[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/bipolar.html|bipolar disorder research index]]
*** Neuroscience Research pages, such as the [[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/serotoninindex.html|serotonin research index]]
*** Not only that, Shawn has [[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/biology_links.html|links to tons of other sites offering free full-text papers]] including:
**** [[http://highwire.stanford.edu/lists/freeart.dtl|Standford University's Highwire]] over 2 million papers available.
**** [[http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/collection|''Science'' magazine's collections]]. Of special interest to us - under Life Sciences - are their collections of papers on
***** [[http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/collection/neuroscience|Neruoscience]]
***** [[http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/collection/pharm_tox|Pharmacology & Toxicology]] the fearmongers must love that common pairing
**** [[http://arrowsmith.psych.uic.edu/arrowsmith_uic/tools.html|And a bunch of tools to make mining The Literature easier]]
* [[Cite:http://www.preskorn.com/|Sheldon Preskorn’s Applied Clinical Psychopharmacology www.preskorn.com]] Sheldon Preskorn M.D.
** Dr. Preskon is Chief Executive Officer of the Clinical Research Institute and a Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University
of Kansas School of Medicine - Wichita
** He has authored over 300 scientific and professional articles
** Many
of them are available at this site, which is full of useful psychopharmacological data involving:
***
drug-drug interactions
***
methods of actions
***
clinical efficacies
***
pharmacokinetics and more.
** They are written in a fairly accessible
way. 
**
Dr. Preskorn has received continuous grant funding since 1978 for studies in the areas of:
***
psychopharmacology
***
neuroscience
***
and psychiatric illnesses. 
**
While most of the articles are at least ten years old, Dr. Preskorn is still publishing papers, so we might be seeing new material eventually. 
**
Regardless, he covers the basics of psychopharmacology in a way that makes sense 
***
and the basics haven't changed much.
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** Unless a paper has the full-text version available at [[http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/|PubMed Central]] in addition to the journal in which it was published.  That's generally the only time an abstract in PubMed will
have a link to more than one location for the entire article, free or not.
to:
** Unless a paper has the full-text version available at [[http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/|PubMed Central]] in addition to the journal in which it was published.  That's generally the only time an abstract in PubMed will have a link to more than one location for the entire article, free or not.
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* [[http://www.cochranelibrary.com/home/topic-and-review-group-list.html?page=editorial-group|Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews]] Not everything is free, but there is a lot of free material here.
** What makes this a key site is that it's a collection of RCTs articles go through a second review process to check for bias (drug company sponsorship, e.g.) and the degree of [[http://blogs.bmj.com/bmj/2015/05/07/hans-lund-a-brief-introduction-to-the-concept-of-evidence-based-research/|evidence-based research]].
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2014-11-20 by JerodPoore -
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A lot of our information comes from direct personal experience, along with that of our friends, and that of the many people who posted all the incarnations of [[https://crazymeds.net/CrazyTalk|Crazy Talk: the Crazymeds forum]] various online support groups, consumer review sites, and the like - what's known in the trade as anecdotal evidence.  I had thought that all sites about meds skewed negative, but [[http://www.jmir.org/2011/3/e53/|this study]] found that sites run by medical professionals were more neutral-to-positive about meds, so that makes me feel a lot better about the data I've gathered from them[^##fox^].  As I also gather data from sites that have nothing to do with medication and medical conditions, I'm pretty confident about both the size and spectrum of any online sampling I do.  Most of them are not random sites either, but are targeted based on demographic data I've collected since I noticed people with certain brain cooties tend to participate in similar activities or have similar interests, and that some sites about those activities/interests have an off-topic area dedicated to the specific mental health issue (depression, anxiety, etc.), or migraines, epilepsy, whatever.  Of course anyone with some other form of brain cooties would post something in that area, but you get the idea.  I'd give some examples, but since Big Pharma refuses to buy any ads because I am, in the words of one Big Pharma ad buyer, "too unpredictable,"[^##viral^] I'm not going to give them any leads to a shitload of potential customers for free.

See [[Meds/MultiPageMedicationArticleUsefulLinks#toc8|the section explaining consumer review sites on
the Guide to Reading our Med Articles]] for more information about sites we use for anecdotal evidence.
to:
A lot of our information comes from direct personal experience, along with that of our friends, and that of the many people who posted all the incarnations of [[https://crazymeds.net/CrazyTalk|Crazy Talk: the Crazymeds forum]] various online support groups, consumer review sites, and the like - what's known in the trade as anecdotal evidence.  I had thought that all sites about meds skewed negative, but [[http://www.jmir.org/2011/3/e53/|this study]] found that sites run by medical professionals were more neutral-to-positive about meds, so that makes me feel a lot better about the data I've gathered from them[^##fox^].  In addition to the reviews & ratings posted about each med and consumer experiences posted on Crazy Talk, I get a most consumer experiences from:
* [[http://www.askapatient.com/|Ask a patient]]
* [[http://www
.drugs.com/search.php|Drugs.com]]
* [[http://www.ehealthme.com/|eHealthMe]]
* [[http://www.patientslikeme.com/treatments|Patients like me]]
* [[http://forums.psychcentral.com/reviews/showcat.php/cat/1|Psych Central]]
* [[http://www.webmd.com/drugs/index-drugs.aspx|WebMD]]
I also gather data from sites that have nothing to do with medication and medical conditions, so I'm pretty confident about both the size and spectrum of any online sampling I do.  Most of them are not random sites either, but are targeted based on demographic data I've collected since I noticed people with certain brain cooties tend to participate in similar activities or have similar interests, and
that some sites about those activities/interests have an off-topic area dedicated to the specific mental health issue (depression, anxiety, etc.), or migraines, epilepsy, whatever.  Of course anyone with some other form of brain cooties would post something in that area, but you get the idea.  I'd give some examples, but since Big Pharma refuses to buy any ads because I am, in the words of one Big Pharma ad buyer, "too unpredictable,"[^##viral^] I'm not going to give them any leads to a shitload of potential customers for free.

See [[Meds/MultiPageMedicationArticleUsefulLinks|the section explaining the page on Useful Links in the Guide to Reading our Med Articles]] for more information about sites we use for anecdotal evidence and other frequently used sites
.
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* [[Cite:http://www.preskorn.com/|Sheldon Preskorn’s Applied Clinical Psychopharmacology www.preskorn.com M.D. Chief Executive Officer of the Clincal Research Institute and a Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Kansas School of Medicine - Wichita]]
to:
* [[Cite:http://www.preskorn.com/|Sheldon Preskorn’s Applied Clinical Psychopharmacology www.preskorn.com M.D. Chief Executive Officer of the Clinical Research Institute and a Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Kansas School of Medicine - Wichita]]
Changed lines 103-115 from:
to:
* Drug names, generic & overseas availability, and assorted pharm-geek data come from several different sites:
** [[http://www.chemspider.com/|Chem Spider]]
** [[http://www.drugs.com/international|Drugs.com's International section]]
** [[http://www.drugbank.ca/|DrugBank]]
** [[http://www.ema.europa.eu/ema/index.jsp?curl=pages/home/Home_Page.jsp&murl=&mid=&jsenabled=true|European Medicines Agency]]
** [[http://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/|PubChem]]
** [[http://www.pharmgkb.org/|PharmGKB]]
** Many, but far from all countries have an equivalent to the FDA that has an online presence.  Of those who do not all of them have a searchable database of available medications[^##search^].  But I've found many throughout Europe, South America, and even a couple in Asia.
*** These sites are often the sources of the SPCs and PILs from across the world as well.
** The official websites of medications or pharmaceutical companies in different countries.  Janssen-Cilag's sites, when not restricted to medical professionals who have accounts that verify their credentials, can be especially helpful with this sort of thing.  Or completely content-free.

[^##search At least not one that I've been able to find while navigating their site after it's been translated by Google and searching them using their search engine or Google and every variant of a generic name I have for a particular med. ^]

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See [[Meds/MultiPageMedicationArticleUsefulLinks#toc8|the section explaining consumer review sites on the Guide to Reading our Med Articles]] for more information about sites we use for anecdotal evidence.
2014-10-07 by JerodPoore -
2014-09-25 by JerodPoore -
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[^##journals I also like reading the journals I get from doctors.  So if you don't see a link to the cited source, I read it in an actual ''magazine'' printed on paper.  Or something approximating paper. ^]
to:
[^##journals I also like reading the journals I get from doctors.  So if you don't see a link to the cited source, I read it in an actual ''magazine'' printed on paper.  Or something approximating paper.  I'll link to the abstract on PubMed or DOI if it's available. ^]
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[[<<]] [[<<]]
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 [[<<]] [[<<]]

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2014-07-29 by JerodPoore -
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(:Title Crazymeds' General Bibliography & Guide to Medical Research Sites:)
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(:Title Crazymeds' General Reference Material & Guide to Medical Research Sites:)
2014-07-20 by JerodPoore -
2014-07-18 by JerodPoore -
Changed line 37 from:
# [[Book:1416030743|Kaufman, David Myland, MD ''Clinical Neurology for Psychiatrists'']]  © 2001 W.B. Saunders Company ISBN:1416030743 [[http://www.elsevierhealth.com/|Elsevier]]
to:
# [[Book:1416030743|Kaufman, David Myland, MD ''Clinical Neurology for Psychiatrists'']] W.B. Saunders Company  2001 ISBN:1416030743
Changed line 40 from:
# [[Book:0323040586|''Mosby's Drug Consult 2007'' (Generic Prescription Physician's Reference Book Series)  © 2007 ISBN:978-0323040587]] An imprint of [[http://www.elsevierhealth.com/|Elsevier]]. The final edition, unfortunately.
to:
# [[Book:0323040586|''Mosby's Drug Consult 2007'' (Generic Prescription Physician's Reference Book Series)]] An imprint of [[http://www.elsevierhealth.com/|Elsevier]] 2007.  ISBN:978-0323040587. The final edition, unfortunately.
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to:

# [[PMC:2656323|Faught, Edward. "Topiramate in the treatment of partial and generalized epilepsy." ''Neuropsychiatric disease and treatment'' 3.6 (2007): 811-821.]]
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[[DOI:dx.doi.org/10.1590/S0004-282X2003000400008|Cardoso, Tânia AMO, Fernando Cendes, and Carlos AM Guerreiro. "Is low antiepileptic drug dose effective in long-term seizure-free patients?." ''Arquivos de neuro-psiquiatria'' 61.3A (2003): 566-573.]]
to:
# [[DOI:dx.doi.org/10.1590/S0004-282X2003000400008|Cardoso, Tânia AMO, Fernando Cendes, and Carlos AM Guerreiro. "Is low antiepileptic drug dose effective in long-term seizure-free patients?." ''Arquivos de neuro-psiquiatria'' 61.3A (2003): 566-573.]]
2014-07-18 by JerodPoore -
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* [[Book:0521673763|Stahl, Stephen M. ''Stahl's Essential Psychopharmacology: Neuroscientific Basis and Practical Applications (Essential Psychopharmacology Series)'' Third edition]] [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]] 2008. ISBN:978-0521673761
* [[Book:1429233435|Julien, Robert M. Ph.D, Claire D. Advokat, and Joseph Comaty ''Primer of Drug Action: A comprehensive guide to the actions, uses, and side effects of psychoactive drugs'' 12th edition]]  [[http://www.worthpublishers.com/|Worth Publishers]] 2011.  ISBN:978-1429233439
* [[Book:0521173647|Stahl, Stephen M. ''The Prescriber's Guide (Essential Psychopharmacology Series)'' Third edition]] [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]] 2009. ISBN:978-0521743990
* [[Book:0889373957|Virani, Adil S., K. Bezchlibnyk-Butler, and J. Jeffries ''Clinical Handbook of Psychotropic Drugs'' 18th edition]] Hogrefe & Huber Publishers 2009. ISBN:978-0889373693
* [[Book:0521136725|Silberstein, Stephen D., Michael J. Marmura ''Essential Neuropharmacology: The Prescriber's Guide''  ]] [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]] 2010. ISBN:978-0521136723
* [[Book:0521531888|Stein, Dan, Bernard Lerer, Stephen Stahl ''Evidence-based Psychopharmacology'']] [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]] 2005. ISBN:978-0521531887
* [[Book:1416030743|''Clinical Neurology for Psychiatrists'' David Myland Kaufman MD © 2001 W.B. Saunders Company]]. An imprint of [[http://www.elsevierhealth.com/|Elsevier]]
* [[Book:0781723213|''Antiepileptic Drugs'' René H. Levy, Richard H. Mattson, Brian S. Meldrum, Emilio Perucca © 2003]]
* [[Book:0880488859|''Pharmacotherapy for Mood, Anxiety, and Cognitive Disorders'' Stuart A. Montgomery, Halbreich Uriel © 2000 ISBN:0880488859]] Published by [[http://www.appi.org|American Psychiatric Publishing]].
* [[Book:0323040586|''Mosby's Drug Consult 2007'' (Generic Prescription Physician's Reference Book Series)  © 2007 ISBN:978-0323040587]] An imprint of [[http://www.elsevierhealth.com/|Elsevier]]. The final edition, unfortunately.
* [[Book:1563638002|''PDR: Physicians' Desk Reference 2010'' 64th edition]] back through to 53rd edition of 1999.  Old copies of the ''PDR'' come in handy for PI sheets that are no longer available and difficult to find, as well as to track the changes in both indications and adverse effects.
* [[Book:0898626749|''Handbook of Affective Disorders'' Second Edition edited by Eugene S. Paykel, MD FRCPsych © 1992 ISBN:0898626749 ]]
*
(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)''The New Chemotherapy in Mental Illness'' edited by Hirsch L. Gordon MD, Ph.D, FAPA © 1958 Philosophical Library, Inc.  Published by Philosophical Library(=html=)</span>(=htmlend=)
to:
# [[Book:0521673763|Stahl, Stephen M. ''Stahl's Essential Psychopharmacology: Neuroscientific Basis and Practical Applications (Essential Psychopharmacology Series)'' Third edition]] [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]] 2008. ISBN:978-0521673761
# [[Book:1429233435|Julien, Robert M. Ph.D, Claire D. Advokat, and Joseph Comaty ''Primer of Drug Action: A comprehensive guide to the actions, uses, and side effects of psychoactive drugs'' 12th edition]]  [[http://www.worthpublishers.com/|Worth Publishers]] 2011.  ISBN:978-1429233439
# [[Book:0521173647|Stahl, Stephen M. ''The Prescriber's Guide (Essential Psychopharmacology Series)'' Third edition]] [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]] 2009. ISBN:978-0521743990
# [[Book:0889373957|Virani, Adil S., K. Bezchlibnyk-Butler, and J. Jeffries ''Clinical Handbook of Psychotropic Drugs'' 18th edition]] Hogrefe & Huber Publishers 2009. ISBN:978-0889373693
# [[Book:0521136725|Silberstein, Stephen D., Michael J. Marmura ''Essential Neuropharmacology: The Prescriber's Guide''  ]] [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]] 2010. ISBN:978-0521136723
# [[Book:0521531888|Stein, Dan, Bernard Lerer, Stephen Stahl ''Evidence-based Psychopharmacology'']] [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]] 2005. ISBN:978-0521531887
# [[Book:1416030743|Kaufman, David Myland, MD ''Clinical Neurology for Psychiatrists'']] © 2001 W.B. Saunders Company ISBN:1416030743 [[http://www.elsevierhealth.com/|Elsevier]]
# [[Book:0781723213|Levy, René H., Richard H. Mattson, Brian S. Meldrum, and Emilio Perucca''Antiepileptic Drugs'']] Lippincott Williams & Wilkins 2003. ISBN:0781723213
# [[Book:0880488859|Montgomery,
Stuart A., Halbreich Uriel ''Pharmacotherapy for Mood, Anxiety, and Cognitive Disorders'']]  [[http://www.appi.org|American Psychiatric Publishing]].  2000 ISBN:0880488859
# [[Book:
0323040586|''Mosby's Drug Consult 2007'' (Generic Prescription Physician's Reference Book Series)  © 2007 ISBN:978-0323040587]] An imprint of [[http://www.elsevierhealth.com/|Elsevier]]. The final edition, unfortunately.
# [[Book:1563638002|''PDR: Physicians' Desk Reference 2010'' 64th edition]] back through to 53rd edition of 1999.  Old copies of the ''PDR'' come in handy for PI sheets that are no longer available and difficult to find, as well as to track the changes in both indications and adverse effects.
# [[Book:0898626749|Paykel, Eugene S., MD FRCPsych ''Handbook of Affective Disorders'' Second Edition]] The Guilford Press 1992 ISBN:0898626749
# (=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)Gordon, Hirsch L., MD, Ph.D, FAPA ''The New Chemotherapy in Mental Illness'' Philosophical Library 1958(=html=)</span>(=htmlend=)
Changed lines 48-52 from:
* [[Book:0393705668|''Instant Psychopharmacology'' 2nd Edition Ronald J. Diamond MD © 2002. ISBN:978-0393703917 Published by W.W. Norton]].
* [[Book:0060897422|''Living Well with Depression and Bipolar Disorder: What Your Doctor Doesn't Tell You...That You Need to Know'' First Edition by John McManamy © 2006. ISBN:978-0060897422 ]]
*
[[Book:1606235427|''The Bipolar Disorder Survival Guide'' David J. Miklowitz, Ph.D © 2002. Published by The Guilford Press]].
* [[Book:047175062X|
''The Complete Guide to Psychiatric Drugs'' Edward Drummond, MD © 2000. ISBN:0471353701 Published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.]]
to:
# [[Book:0393705668|Diamond, Ronald J., MD ''Instant Psychopharmacology'' 2nd Edition]] W.W. Norton 2002. ISBN:978-0393703917
# [[Book:
0060897422|McManamy, John ''Living Well with Depression and Bipolar Disorder: What Your Doctor Doesn't Tell You...That You Need to Know'' First Edition]] Collins 2006. ISBN:978-0060897422
# [[Book:1606235427|Miklowitz, David J., Ph.D ''The Bipolar Disorder Survival Guide'']] The Guilford Press  2002.
# [[Book:047175062X|Drummond, Edward, MD
''The Complete Guide to Psychiatric Drugs'']] John Wiley & Sons 2000. ISBN:0471353701
Changed line 56 from:
* [[Cite:http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/444804|Ma, Margaret K., Michael H. Woo, and Howard L. Mcleod. "Genetic basis of drug metabolism." ''American Journal of Health System Pharmacy'' 59.21 (2002): 2061-2069.]]
to:
# [[Cite:http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/444804|Ma, Margaret K., Michael H. Woo, and Howard L. Mcleod. "Genetic basis of drug metabolism." ''American Journal of Health System Pharmacy'' 59.21 (2002): 2061-2069.]]
Changed lines 58-63 from:
* [[PMC:3237392|Hinz, Marty, Alvin Stein, and Thomas Uncini. "Monoamine depletion by reuptake inhibitors." ''Drug, healthcare and patient safety'' 3 (2011): 69.]] Marty Hinz; Alvin Stein; Thomas Uncini ''Drug, Healthcare and Patient Safety'', October 2011 - Dove Press
* [[Cite:http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/821038-overview|Olson, Kent R  MD, FACEP, Michael A Miller, MD, et al. "Warfarin and Superwarfarin Toxicity" emedicine.medscape.com (2013)]]
* [[Cite:http://www.aafp.org/afp/2007/0801/p391.html|Lynch, Tom, PharmD, and Amy Price, MD "The Effect of Cytochrome P450 Metabolism on Drug Response, Interactions, and Adverse Effects" ''Am Fam Physician''. 2007 Aug 1;76(3):391-396.]]
* [[Cite:http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/clinical_pharmacology/pharmacokinetics/overview_of_pharmacokinetics.html|Le, Jennifer, PharmD, MAS, BCPS-ID  "Pharmacokinetics" ''Merck Manual for Healthcare Professionals'' Last revised May 2014]]
* [[http://www.pharmacorama.com/en/Sections/Pharmacokinetics.php|Pharmacorama's Pharmacokinetics section]]
to:
# [[PMC:3237392|Hinz, Marty, Alvin Stein, and Thomas Uncini. "Monoamine depletion by reuptake inhibitors." ''Drug, healthcare and patient safety'' 3 (2011): 69.]] Marty Hinz; Alvin Stein; Thomas Uncini ''Drug, Healthcare and Patient Safety'', October 2011 - Dove Press
# [[Cite:http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/821038-overview|Olson, Kent R  MD, FACEP, Michael A Miller, MD, et al. "Warfarin and Superwarfarin Toxicity" emedicine.medscape.com (2013)]]
# [[Cite:http://www.aafp.org/afp/2007/0801/p391.html|Lynch, Tom, PharmD, and Amy Price, MD "The Effect of Cytochrome P450 Metabolism on Drug Response, Interactions, and Adverse Effects" ''Am Fam Physician''. 2007 Aug 1;76(3):391-396.]]
# [[Cite:http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/clinical_pharmacology/pharmacokinetics/overview_of_pharmacokinetics.html|Le, Jennifer, PharmD, MAS, BCPS-ID  "Pharmacokinetics" ''Merck Manual for Healthcare Professionals'' Last revised May 2014]]
# [[http://www.pharmacorama.com/en/Sections/Pharmacokinetics.php|Pharmacorama's Pharmacokinetics section]]
Changed lines 221-222 from:
(:if expr ( equal {$@crazy_meds_device} "mobile" ) || ( equal {$@crazy_meds_device} "satellite" ) :)
[[<<]]
to:
(:if ( equal {$@crazy_meds_device} "mobile" )  :)
Changed lines 223-224 from:
Page design and explanatory material by Jerod Poore, copyright © 2004 - 2014.  All rights reserved.  Don't automatically believe everything you read on teh Intergoogles. [[<<]]
[[
Sources/Copyright|Full copyright notice]].  [[Sources/Disclaimer|Our big-ass disclaimer]].
to:
(:include Sources/Copylite:)
Deleted line 224:
[[<<]]
2014-07-14 by JerodPoore -
Changed line 54 from:
Links will take you to the free full-text.
to:
These are mainly about pharmacology.  Links will take you to the free full-text articles or sections of websites devoted to pharmacology.
Changed lines 57-61 from:
* (=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0004-282X2003000400008&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en|Is low antiepileptic drug dose effective in long-term seizure-free patients?]](=html=)</span>(=htmlend=) Tânia A.M.O. Cardoso; Fernando Cendes; Carlos A.M. Guerreiro  ''Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria'' vol.61 no.3A  Sept. 2003
* (=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)
[[https://www.dovepress.com/getfile.php?fileID=11237|Monoamine depletion by reuptake inhibitors]](=html=)</span>(=htmlend=) Marty Hinz; Alvin Stein; Thomas Uncini ''Drug, Healthcare and Patient Safety'', October 2011 - Dove Press
*
[[Cite:http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/821038-overview|Warfarin and Superwarfarin Toxicity emedicine.medscape.com]] Kent R Olson, MD, FACEP, Michael A Miller, MD, et al. Updated: May 14, 2013

to:
[[DOI:dx.doi.org/10.1590/S0004-282X2003000400008|Cardoso, Tânia AMO, Fernando Cendes, and Carlos AM Guerreiro. "Is low antiepileptic drug dose effective in long-term seizure-free patients?." ''Arquivos de neuro-psiquiatria'' 61.3A (2003): 566-573.]]
* [[PMC:3237392|Hinz, Marty, Alvin Stein, and Thomas Uncini
. "Monoamine depletion by reuptake inhibitors." ''Drug, healthcare and patient safety'' 3 (2011): 69.]] Marty Hinz; Alvin Stein; Thomas Uncini ''Drug, Healthcare and Patient Safety'', October 2011 - Dove Press
*
[[Cite:http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/821038-overview|Olson, Kent R  MD, FACEP, Michael A Miller, MD, et al. "Warfarin and Superwarfarin Toxicity" emedicine.medscape.com (2013)]]
*
[[Cite:http://www.aafp.org/afp/2007/0801/p391.html|Lynch, Tom, PharmD, and Amy Price, MD "The Effect of Cytochrome P450 Metabolism on Drug Response, Interactions, and Adverse Effects" ''Am Fam Physician''. 2007 Aug 1;76(3):391-396.]]
* [[Cite:http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/clinical_pharmacology/pharmacokinetics/overview_of_pharmacokinetics.html|Le, Jennifer, PharmD, MAS, BCPS-ID  "Pharmacokinetics" ''Merck Manual for Healthcare Professionals'' Last revised May 2014]]
* [[http://www.pharmacorama.com/en/Sections/Pharmacokinetics.php|Pharmacorama's Pharmacokinetics section]]

Added line 145:
* [[http://www.pharmacorama.com/en/index.php|Pharmacorama - drug knowledge]].  If you're studying drugs in medical or pharmacy school, or as a writer, think of Pharmacorama as something along the study guide to Cliff's Notes spectrum.  They're pretty damn close to essential.
2014-07-13 by JerodPoore -
Changed line 56 from:
* (=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/444804|Genetic Basis of Drug Metabolism]](=html=)</span>(=htmlend=)
to:
* [[Cite:http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/444804|Ma, Margaret K., Michael H. Woo, and Howard L. Mcleod. "Genetic basis of drug metabolism." ''American Journal of Health System Pharmacy'' 59.21 (2002): 2061-2069.]]
2014-07-13 by JerodPoore -
Changed lines 31-36 from:
* [[Book:0521673763|''Stahl's Essential Psychopharmacology: Neuroscientific Basis and Practical Applications (Essential Psychopharmacology Series)''  Third edition  by Stephen M. Stahl © 2008 ISBN:978-0521673761]]  Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].
* [[Book:1429233435|''Primer of Drug Action'' 12th edition by Robert M. Julien Ph.D, Claire D. Advokat, Joseph Comaty © 2011 ISBN:978-1429233439]]  Published by [[http://www.worthpublishers.com/|Worth Publishers]].
*
[[Book:0521173647|''The Prescriber's Guide (Essential Psychopharmacology Series)'' Third edition by Stephen Stahl © 2009 ISBN:978-0521743990]] Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].
* [[Book:0889373957|''Clinical Handbook of Psychotropic Drugs'' 18th edition Adil S. Virani, K. Bezchlibnyk-Butler, J. Jeffries © 2009 ISBN:978-0889373693 Published by Hogrefe & Huber Publishers]].
* [[Book:0521136725|''Essential Neuropharmacology: The Prescriber's Guide'' Stephen D. Silberstein, Michael J. Marmura © 2010 ISBN:978-0521136723]] Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].
* [[Book:0521531888|''Evidence-based Psychopharmacology'' Dan Stein, Bernard Lerer, Stephen Stahl © 2005 ISBN
:978-0521531887]] Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].
to:
* [[Book:0521673763|Stahl, Stephen M. ''Stahl's Essential Psychopharmacology: Neuroscientific Basis and Practical Applications (Essential Psychopharmacology Series)'' Third edition]] [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]] 2008. ISBN:978-0521673761
* [[Book:1429233435|Julien, Robert M. Ph.D, Claire D. Advokat, and Joseph Comaty ''Primer of Drug Action: A comprehensive guide to the actions, uses, and side effects of psychoactive drugs'' 12th edition]]  [[http://www.worthpublishers.com/|Worth Publishers]] 2011.  ISBN:978-1429233439
* [[Book:0521173647|Stahl, Stephen M. ''The Prescriber's Guide (Essential Psychopharmacology Series)'' Third edition
]] [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]] 2009. ISBN:978-0521743990
* [[Book:
0889373957|Virani, Adil S., K. Bezchlibnyk-Butler, and J. Jeffries ''Clinical Handbook of Psychotropic Drugs'' 18th edition]] Hogrefe & Huber Publishers 2009. ISBN:978-0889373693
* [[Book:0521136725|Silberstein, Stephen D
., Michael J. Marmura ''Essential Neuropharmacology: The Prescriber's Guide''  ]] [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]] 2010. ISBN:978-0521136723
* [[Book:0521531888|Stein, Dan, Bernard Lerer, Stephen Stahl ''Evidence-based Psychopharmacology'']] [[http
://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]] 2005. ISBN:978-0521531887
2014-07-12 by JerodPoore -
2014-07-08 by JerodPoore -
2014-07-08 by JerodPoore -
Changed lines 33-36 from:
* [[Book:0521173647|''The Prescriber's Guide (Essential Psychopharmacology Series)'' Third edition by Stephen Stahl © 2009]] Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].
* [[Book:0889373957|''Clinical Handbook of Psychotropic Drugs'' 18th edition Adil S. Virani, K. Bezchlibnyk-Butler, J. Jeffries © 2009 Published by Hogrefe & Huber Publishers]].
* [[Book:0521136725|''Essential Neuropharmacology: The Prescriber's Guide'' Stephen D. Silberstein, Michael J. Marmura © 2010]] Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].
* [[Book:0521531888|''Evidence-based Psychopharmacology'' Dan Stein, Bernard Lerer, Stephen Stahl © 2005]] Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].
to:
* [[Book:0521173647|''The Prescriber's Guide (Essential Psychopharmacology Series)'' Third edition by Stephen Stahl © 2009 ISBN:978-0521743990]] Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].
* [[Book:0889373957|''Clinical Handbook of Psychotropic Drugs'' 18th edition Adil S. Virani, K. Bezchlibnyk-Butler, J. Jeffries © 2009 ISBN:978-0889373693 Published by Hogrefe & Huber Publishers]].
* [[Book:0521136725|''Essential Neuropharmacology: The Prescriber's Guide'' Stephen D. Silberstein, Michael J. Marmura © 2010 ISBN:978-0521136723]] Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].
* [[Book:0521531888|''Evidence-based Psychopharmacology'' Dan Stein, Bernard Lerer, Stephen Stahl © 2005 ISBN:978-0521531887]] Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].
Changed lines 39-40 from:
* [[Book:0880488859|''Pharmacotherapy for Mood, Anxiety, and Cognitive Disorders'' Stuart A. Montgomery, Halbreich Uriel © 2000]] Published by [[http://www.appi.org|American Psychiatric Publishing]].
* [[Book:0323040586|''Mosby's Drug Consult 2007'' (Generic Prescription Physician's Reference Book Series)]] © 2007 An imprint of [[http://www.elsevierhealth.com/|Elsevier]]. The final edition, unfortunately.
to:
* [[Book:0880488859|''Pharmacotherapy for Mood, Anxiety, and Cognitive Disorders'' Stuart A. Montgomery, Halbreich Uriel © 2000 ISBN:0880488859]] Published by [[http://www.appi.org|American Psychiatric Publishing]].
* [[Book:0323040586|''Mosby's Drug Consult 2007'' (Generic Prescription Physician's Reference Book Series)  © 2007 ISBN:978-0323040587]] An imprint of [[http://www.elsevierhealth.com/|Elsevier]]. The final edition, unfortunately.
Changed line 42 from:
* [[Book:0898626749|''Handbook of Affective Disorders'' edited by Eugene S. Paykel, MD FRCPsych]]
to:
* [[Book:0898626749|''Handbook of Affective Disorders'' Second Edition edited by Eugene S. Paykel, MD FRCPsych © 1992 ISBN:0898626749 ]]
Changed lines 48-49 from:
* [[Book:0393705668|''Instant Psychopharmacology'' 2nd Edition Ronald J. Diamond MD © 2002. Published by W.W. Norton]].
* [[Book:0060897422|''Living Well with Depression and Bipolar Disorder: What Your Doctor Doesn't Tell You...That You Need to Know'' John McManamy]]
to:
* [[Book:0393705668|''Instant Psychopharmacology'' 2nd Edition Ronald J. Diamond MD © 2002. ISBN:978-0393703917 Published by W.W. Norton]].
* [[Book:0060897422|''Living Well with Depression and Bipolar Disorder: What Your Doctor Doesn't Tell You...That You Need to Know'' First Edition by John McManamy © 2006. ISBN:978-0060897422 ]]
Changed line 51 from:
* [[Book:047175062X|''The Complete Guide to Psychiatric Drugs'' Edward Drummond, MD © 2000. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.]]
to:
* [[Book:047175062X|''The Complete Guide to Psychiatric Drugs'' Edward Drummond, MD © 2000. ISBN:0471353701 Published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.]]
2014-07-08 by JerodPoore -
Changed lines 94-95 from:
* [[http://www.preskorn.com/|Sheldon Preskorn's Applied Clinical Psychopharmacology]] Dr. Preskorn has authored over 300 scientific and professional articles, and many of them are available at this site, which is full of useful psychopharmacological data involving drug-drug interactions, methods of actions, clinical efficacies, pharmacokinetics and more written in a fairly accessible way.  Dr. Preskorn has received continuous grant funding since 1978 for studies in the areas of psychopharmacology, neuroscience, and psychiatric illnesses.  While most of the articles are at least ten years old, Dr. Preskorn is still publishing papers, so we might be seeing new material eventually.  Regardless, he covers the basics of psychopharmacology in a way that makes sense, and the basics haven't changed much.
to:
* [[Cite:http://www.preskorn.com/|Sheldon Preskorn’s Applied Clinical Psychopharmacology www.preskorn.com M.D. Chief Executive Officer of the Clincal Research Institute and a Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Kansas School of Medicine - Wichita]]
**
Dr. Preskorn has authored over 300 scientific and professional articles, and many of them are available at this site, which is full of useful psychopharmacological data involving drug-drug interactions, methods of actions, clinical efficacies, pharmacokinetics and more written in a fairly accessible way.  Dr. Preskorn has received continuous grant funding since 1978 for studies in the areas of psychopharmacology, neuroscience, and psychiatric illnesses.  While most of the articles are at least ten years old, Dr. Preskorn is still publishing papers, so we might be seeing new material eventually.  Regardless, he covers the basics of psychopharmacology in a way that makes sense, and the basics haven't changed much.
2014-07-08 by JerodPoore -
2014-06-22 by JerodPoore -
Changed lines 31-32 from:
* [[Book:0521673763|''Stahl's Essential Psychopharmacology: Neuroscientific Basis and Practical Applications (Essential Psychopharmacology Series)'' Third edition  by Stephen M. Stahl © 2008]] Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].
* [[Book:1429233435|''Primer of Drug Action'' 12th edition by Robert M. Julien Ph.D, Claire D. Advokat, Joseph Comaty © 2011]]  Published by [[http://www.worthpublishers.com/|Worth Publishers]].
to:
* [[Book:0521673763|''Stahl's Essential Psychopharmacology: Neuroscientific Basis and Practical Applications (Essential Psychopharmacology Series)''  Third edition  by Stephen M. Stahl © 2008 ISBN:978-0521673761]]  Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].
* [[Book:1429233435|''Primer of Drug Action'' 12th edition by Robert M. Julien Ph.D, Claire D. Advokat, Joseph Comaty © 2011 ISBN:978-1429233439]]  Published by [[http://www.worthpublishers.com/|Worth Publishers]].
2014-06-22 by JerodPoore -
Added lines 59-60:
* [[Cite:http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/821038-overview|Warfarin and Superwarfarin Toxicity emedicine.medscape.com]] Kent R Olson, MD, FACEP, Michael A Miller, MD, et al. Updated: May 14, 2013
2014-06-21 by JerodPoore -
Deleted line 100:
* [[http://scholar.google.com/|Google ''Scholar'']].  In case you need the URL spelled out for you: scholar.google.com Note the scholar part.  For anything that may have slipped through the cracks of PubMed and PLoS.  As with PubMed, not everything listed as a free full-text article is.  Unlike PubMed, sometimes there are free full-text versions when it looks as if there isn't.  Whenever you see an option for "All # Versions", click it, as there may be a link to a full-text version that didn't make the main page for some reason.  And if that link to a full-text version was a bait'n'switch job, maybe one of the other versions has the full text for free for real.
Added lines 103-124:
* [[http://scholar.google.com/|Google ''Scholar'']].  In case you need the URL spelled out for you: scholar.google.com Note the scholar part.  Google Scholar has made finding papers both easier and vastly more frustrating.
** Easier because it's basically regular Google that has filtered out ''most'' of the crap that doesn't meet peer-review specifications.
** More frustrating because it's Google.  Which means...
*** it includes all sorts of crap that shouldn't be there;
*** still omits stuff you expect Google to find;
*** returns dead links;
**** repeatedly;
*** its advanced search, while much improved, still doesn't come close to PubMed's sophistication;
**** "sophistication" also means "difficulty of use for anyone who hasn't spent years in the data mines";
*** and lies about papers being free full-text five times as often as PubMed.
* Google Scholar has a ''huge'' advantage over PubMed.  PubMed usually lists only one place where an article appears.
** Unless a paper has the full-text version available at [[http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/|PubMed Central]] in addition to the journal in which it was published.  That's generally the only time an abstract in PubMed will
have a link to more than one location for the entire article, free or not.
** Google Scholar lists every place it can find the abstract, full text, and where it was cited.  In one handy location.
** Which means if PubMed has a link to the journal in which the article was published, and it costs money to read it, Google might have a link to a journal where, for some reason, it's free but not pirated.
*** Don't ask me how academic intellectual property rights work. I have no clue.
** So if both Google Scholar and PubMed have pulled the free full-text bait'n'switch[^##notfree^], you still might be able to find some.
*** If there is a link for "All (some number) versions", click on it.  That will take you to a page of links (real or imagined) to ''all'' versions Google can find.
**** Including cites and patents.
*** Depending on how badly you want to see an article without paying for it you may as well click on everything.  Eventually you'll get a feel for which sites have free full-text, even when they aren't listed as having it.

[^##notfree It's not their fault. Mostly. Many journals make articles available for free for a limited time, and going back to update that change is a hell of a lot of work.  I can also understand why articles are free for just a couple of months.  Bandwidth isn't free.  The Scientific, Technical & Medical publishing division of Reed-Elsevier managed to clear a profit of only £826,000,000 (about 1.3 billion US dollars) in 2013, without any advertising in their online publications.  There's your option, kids. I could charge $15 an article and all your ad-blocking software be useless.  Since it's putting publishers like me who offer free content in exchange for ads out of business, it will probably wind up being useless in a couple of {-years-} {-months-} weeks in any event. ^]
2014-06-05 by JerodPoore -
Changed line 1 from:
(:Title Crazymeds' General Bibliography :)
to:
(:Title Crazymeds' General Bibliography & Guide to Medical Research Sites:)
Changed lines 73-74 from:
Even though we, and other people, cite a bunch of stuff, how do you know it's any good?  The best way is to ask someone who reads a lot of this stuff for a living[^##life^].  If you don't have access to someone like that, at least I have [[MedInfo/Researching|a Page on Evaluating Research Papers]] and [[MedInfo/PsychTests|a Page on Rating the Assessment Tests]] used by the people who write said papers.  Scrutinize Crazymeds and every other site that backs up what is written there with references to peer-reviewed journals and the like.
to:
Even though we, and other people, cite a bunch of stuff, how do you know it's any good?  The best way is to ask someone who reads a lot of this stuff for a living[^##life^].  If you don't have access to someone like that, at least I have [[MedInfo/Researching|a Page on Evaluating Research Papers]], which shows you how to tell if a paper uses good science or not, and [[MedInfo/PsychTests|a Page on Rating the Assessment Tests]] used by the people who write said papers.  Scrutinize Crazymeds and every other site that backs up what is written there with references to peer-reviewed journals and the like.
Added lines 140-148:

!!!Tips on Finding and Reading Research Papers
Finding and Reading The Literature is as much of an art as the research itself.  Here are a few peer-reviewed tips:
* If you don't know where to start, [[http://www.angelo.edu/services/library/handouts/peerrev.php|Angelo State University's pamphlet ''How to recognize peer-reviewed (refereed) journals'']] is extremely basic. 
** I keep forgetting everyone who reads this site does not have over a decade's experience with this crap.
** Just pretend you're writing a paper for college.
* Trisha Greenhalgh of ''The BMJ'' has written [[http://www.bmj.com/about-bmj/resources-readers/publications/how-read-paper|several articles about how to read and interpret research papers]].
* Once again: [[MedInfo/Researching|the Page on Evaluating Research Papers]] has a shitload of info on how to tell if the papers you find are any good.

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(:ifend:)
to:
(:ifend:)
2014-06-05 by JerodPoore -
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Even though we, and other people, cite a bunch of stuff, how do you know it's any good?  The best way is to ask someone who reads a lot of this stuff for a living[^##life^].  If you don't have access to someone like that, at least I have [[MedInfo/PsychTests|a Page on Rating Assessment Tests and Research Papers]].  Scrutinize Crazymeds and every other site that backs up what is written there with references to peer-reviewed journals and the like. 
to:
Even though we, and other people, cite a bunch of stuff, how do you know it's any good?  The best way is to ask someone who reads a lot of this stuff for a living[^##life^].  If you don't have access to someone like that, at least I have [[MedInfo/Researching|a Page on Evaluating Research Papers]] and [[MedInfo/PsychTests|a Page on Rating the Assessment Tests]] used by the people who write said papers.  Scrutinize Crazymeds and every other site that backs up what is written there with references to peer-reviewed journals and the like. 
2014-06-03 by JerodPoore -
Changed lines 80-93 from:
to:
* [[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/index.php|Neurotransmitter.net]] Tons of information and research on psychiatric and neurological conditions, the drugs that treat them, the rating scales used to measure the efficacy of said drugs, and much, much more.  All neatly indexed and categorized to make it easy to make sense of a bunch of diverse information. I had no idea [[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/hangover.html|how much research was being done on hangovers]] until I hit this site.  I knew doctors liked to party (considering that my stepfather is a vascular surgeon I had a first-hand look at how much doctors liked to party), but who knew they were getting grant money for it?  A key site for patients, students and, most importantly, doctors of all stripes, shapes and sizes.[[<<]]
Must-read sections include:
** [[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/drug_reference.html|Drug Reference for FDA Approved Psychiatric Drugs @ Neurotransmitter.net]]
*** as well as [[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/epilepsy_drug_reference.html|AEDs]], [[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/migraine_drug_reference.html|meds for migraines]], [[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/parkinsons_drug_reference.html|Parkinson's]], and [[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/alzheimers_drug_reference.html|Alzheimer's]].
** The Disorders Research pages, such as the [[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/bipolar.html|bipolar disorder research index]]
** Neuroscience Research pages, such as the [[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/serotoninindex.html|serotonin research index]]
** Not only that, Shawn has [[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/biology_links.html|links to tons of other sites offering free full-text papers]] including:
*** [[http://highwire.stanford.edu/lists/freeart.dtl|Standford University's Highwire]] over 2 million papers available.
*** [[http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/collection|''Science'' magazine's collections]]. Of special interest to us - under Life Sciences - are their collections of papers on
**** [[http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/collection/neuroscience|Neruoscience]]
**** [[http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/collection/pharm_tox|Pharmacology & Toxicology]] the fearmongers must love that common pairing
*** [[http://arrowsmith.psych.uic.edu/arrowsmith_uic/tools.html|And a bunch of tools to make mining The Literature easier]]
* [[http://www.preskorn.com/|Sheldon Preskorn's Applied Clinical Psychopharmacology]] Dr. Preskorn has authored over 300 scientific and professional articles, and many of them are available at this site, which is full of useful psychopharmacological data involving drug-drug interactions, methods of actions, clinical efficacies, pharmacokinetics and more written in a fairly accessible way.  Dr. Preskorn has received continuous grant funding since 1978 for studies in the areas of psychopharmacology, neuroscience, and psychiatric illnesses.  While most of the articles are at least ten years old, Dr. Preskorn is still publishing papers, so we might be seeing new material eventually.  Regardless, he covers the basics of psychopharmacology in a way that makes sense, and the basics haven't changed much.

Deleted lines 98-103:
* [[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/index.php|Neurotransmitter.net]] Tons of information and research on psychiatric and neurological conditions, the drugs that treat them, the rating scales used to measure the efficacy of said drugs, and much, much more.  All neatly indexed and categorized to make it easy to make sense of a bunch of diverse information. I had no idea [[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/hangover.html|how much research was being done on hangovers]] until I hit this site.  I knew doctors liked to party (considering that my stepfather is a vascular surgeon I had a first-hand look at how much doctors liked to party), but who knew they were getting grant money for it?  A key site for patients, students and, most importantly, doctors of all stripes, shapes and sizes.  Not only that, Shawn has [[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/biology_links.html|links to tons of other sites offering free full-text papers]] including:
** [[http://highwire.stanford.edu/lists/freeart.dtl|Standford University's Highwire]] over 2 million papers available.
** [[http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/collection|''Science'' magazine's collections]]. Of special interest to us - under Life Sciences - are their collections of papers on
*** [[http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/collection/neuroscience|Neruoscience]]
*** [[http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/collection/pharm_tox|Pharmacology & Toxicology]] the fearmongers must love that common pairing
** [[http://arrowsmith.psych.uic.edu/arrowsmith_uic/tools.html|And a bunch of tools to make mining The Literature easier]]
Deleted line 102:
* [[http://www.preskorn.com/|Sheldon Preskorn's Applied Clinical Psychopharmacology]] Dr. Preskorn has authored over 300 scientific and professional articles, and many of them are available at this site, which is full of useful psychopharmacological data involving drug-drug interactions, methods of actions, clinical efficacies, pharmacokinetics and more written in a fairly accessible way.  Dr. Preskorn has received continuous grant funding since 1978 for studies in the areas of psychopharmacology, neuroscience, and psychiatric illnesses.  While most of the articles are at least ten years old, Dr. Preskorn is still publishing papers, so we might be seeing new material eventually.  Regardless, he covers the basics of psychopharmacology in a way that makes sense, and the basics haven't changed much.
2014-06-01 by JerodPoore -
Changed lines 67-77 from:
to:
!!!If It's on the Internet it Must be True?
[+ '''Know your sources!''' +]
It should be obvious, but in case it's not, any site that makes claim about drugs, supplements, therapies, etc. needs to be backed up by cites (references) to quality research material and/or clearly labeled "my personal experience and experience of people I know."  That's how we do it at Crazymeds, one of the first of a limited number of sites that combines lots of personal experience (anecdotal evidence) and lots of research[^##wik^].

So if you read an article making vague references, or cites other pages on the same site or elsewhere that are equally full claims with nothing in the way of proof, consider it "for entertainment purposes only."  What you want are sites full of cites, like much, but not all, of Wikipedia, and the articles you'll find on the sites below.

Even though we, and other people, cite a bunch of stuff, how do you know it's any good?  The best way is to ask someone who reads a lot of this stuff for a living[^##life^].  If you don't have access to someone like that, at least I have [[MedInfo/PsychTests|a Page on Rating Assessment Tests and Research Papers]].  Scrutinize Crazymeds and every other site that backs up what is written there with references to peer-reviewed journals and the like. 

[^##wik Which is apparent as there are often more cites than the Wikipedia article for the same med. ^]
[^##life Although most people doing that will usually make the same joke about it not really being a living. ^]

Changed lines 79-80 from:
Want to do some of your own research?  Here are the places either we use all the time, or have recently found and will be using all the time.
to:
Ready to do some of your own research?  Here are the places either we use all the time, or have recently found and will be using all the time.
Changed lines 103-104 from:
I cannot stress this enough: Potency and efficacy are two very different things.
to:
I cannot stress this enough: Potency and efficacy are two very different things.[[<<]]
Also: if you don't know how to use the database, and what all parameters and results mean, you probably shouldn't be using it in the first place
.
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<meta property="og:description" content="Updated {(ftime fmt="%b %d, %Y" when=@{*$LastModifiedTime})}" />
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2014-06-01 by JerodPoore -
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All drug names are the trademarks of someone else.  Look on the appropriate PI sheets or ask [[http://www.google.com|Google]] who the owners are.  The way pharmaceutical companies buy each other and swap products like Monopoly™ real estate, the ownership of any trademarks may have changed without my noticing.
to:
All drug names are the trademarks of someone else.  Look on the appropriate PI sheets or ask Google who the owners are.  The way pharmaceutical companies buy each other and swap products like Monopoly™ real estate, the ownership of any trademarks may have changed without my noticing.
2014-05-14 by JerodPoore -
Changed lines 31-42 from:
* [[Cite:0521673763|''Stahl's Essential Psychopharmacology: Neuroscientific Basis and Practical Applications (Essential Psychopharmacology Series)'' Third edition  by Stephen M. Stahl © 2008]]  Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].
* [[Cite:1429233435|''Primer of Drug Action'' 12th edition by Robert M. Julien Ph.D, Claire D. Advokat, Joseph Comaty © 2011]]  Published by [[http://www.worthpublishers.com/|Worth Publishers]].
* [[Cite:0521173647|''The Prescriber's Guide (Essential Psychopharmacology Series)'' Third edition by Stephen Stahl © 2009]] Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].
* [[Cite:0889373957|''Clinical Handbook of Psychotropic Drugs'' 18th edition Adil S. Virani, K. Bezchlibnyk-Butler, J. Jeffries © 2009 Published by Hogrefe & Huber Publishers]].
* [[Cite:0521136725|''Essential Neuropharmacology: The Prescriber's Guide'' Stephen D. Silberstein, Michael J. Marmura © 2010]] Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].
* [[Cite:0521531888|''Evidence-based Psychopharmacology'' Dan Stein, Bernard Lerer, Stephen Stahl © 2005]] Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].
* [[Cite:1416030743|''Clinical Neurology for Psychiatrists'' David Myland Kaufman MD © 2001 W.B. Saunders Company]]. An imprint of [[http://www.elsevierhealth.com/|Elsevier]]
* [[Cite:0781723213|''Antiepileptic Drugs'' René H. Levy, Richard H. Mattson, Brian S. Meldrum, Emilio Perucca © 2003]]
* [[Cite:0880488859|''Pharmacotherapy for Mood, Anxiety, and Cognitive Disorders'' Stuart A. Montgomery, Halbreich Uriel © 2000]] Published by [[http://www.appi.org|American Psychiatric Publishing]].
* [[Cite:0323040586|''Mosby's Drug Consult 2007'' (Generic Prescription Physician's Reference Book Series)]] © 2007 An imprint of [[http://www.elsevierhealth.com/|Elsevier]]. The final edition, unfortunately.
* [[Cite:1563638002|''PDR: Physicians' Desk Reference 2010'' 64th edition]] back through to 53rd edition of 1999.  Old copies of the ''PDR'' come in handy for PI sheets that are no longer available and difficult to find, as well as to track the changes in both indications and adverse effects.
* [[Cite:0898626749|''Handbook of Affective Disorders'' edited by Eugene S. Paykel, MD FRCPsych]]
to:
* [[Book:0521673763|''Stahl's Essential Psychopharmacology: Neuroscientific Basis and Practical Applications (Essential Psychopharmacology Series)'' Third edition  by Stephen M. Stahl © 2008]]  Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].
* [[Book:1429233435|''Primer of Drug Action'' 12th edition by Robert M. Julien Ph.D, Claire D. Advokat, Joseph Comaty © 2011]]  Published by [[http://www.worthpublishers.com/|Worth Publishers]].
* [[Book:0521173647|''The Prescriber's Guide (Essential Psychopharmacology Series)'' Third edition by Stephen Stahl © 2009]] Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].
* [[Book:0889373957|''Clinical Handbook of Psychotropic Drugs'' 18th edition Adil S. Virani, K. Bezchlibnyk-Butler, J. Jeffries © 2009 Published by Hogrefe & Huber Publishers]].
* [[Book:0521136725|''Essential Neuropharmacology: The Prescriber's Guide'' Stephen D. Silberstein, Michael J. Marmura © 2010]] Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].
* [[Book:0521531888|''Evidence-based Psychopharmacology'' Dan Stein, Bernard Lerer, Stephen Stahl © 2005]] Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].
* [[Book:1416030743|''Clinical Neurology for Psychiatrists'' David Myland Kaufman MD © 2001 W.B. Saunders Company]]. An imprint of [[http://www.elsevierhealth.com/|Elsevier]]
* [[Book:0781723213|''Antiepileptic Drugs'' René H. Levy, Richard H. Mattson, Brian S. Meldrum, Emilio Perucca © 2003]]
* [[Book:0880488859|''Pharmacotherapy for Mood, Anxiety, and Cognitive Disorders'' Stuart A. Montgomery, Halbreich Uriel © 2000]] Published by [[http://www.appi.org|American Psychiatric Publishing]].
* [[Book:0323040586|''Mosby's Drug Consult 2007'' (Generic Prescription Physician's Reference Book Series)]] © 2007 An imprint of [[http://www.elsevierhealth.com/|Elsevier]]. The final edition, unfortunately.
* [[Book:1563638002|''PDR: Physicians' Desk Reference 2010'' 64th edition]] back through to 53rd edition of 1999.  Old copies of the ''PDR'' come in handy for PI sheets that are no longer available and difficult to find, as well as to track the changes in both indications and adverse effects.
* [[Book:0898626749|''Handbook of Affective Disorders'' edited by Eugene S. Paykel, MD FRCPsych]]
Changed lines 48-51 from:
* [[Cite:0393705668|''Instant Psychopharmacology'' 2nd Edition Ronald J. Diamond MD © 2002. Published by W.W. Norton]].
* [[Cite:0060897422|''Living Well with Depression and Bipolar Disorder: What Your Doctor Doesn't Tell You...That You Need to Know'' John McManamy]]
* [[Cite:1606235427|''The Bipolar Disorder Survival Guide'' David J. Miklowitz, Ph.D © 2002. Published by The Guilford Press]].
* [[Cite:047175062X|''The Complete Guide to Psychiatric Drugs'' Edward Drummond, MD © 2000. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.]]
to:
* [[Book:0393705668|''Instant Psychopharmacology'' 2nd Edition Ronald J. Diamond MD © 2002. Published by W.W. Norton]].
* [[Book:0060897422|''Living Well with Depression and Bipolar Disorder: What Your Doctor Doesn't Tell You...That You Need to Know'' John McManamy]]
* [[Book:1606235427|''The Bipolar Disorder Survival Guide'' David J. Miklowitz, Ph.D © 2002. Published by The Guilford Press]].
* [[Book:047175062X|''The Complete Guide to Psychiatric Drugs'' Edward Drummond, MD © 2000. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.]]
2014-05-12 by JerodPoore -
Changed lines 27-29 from:
Here are the key books and papers that comprise the foundation of what we know about neuropsychopharmacology.  As expensive as it is, ''I'' consider paper to be the superior medium.  Follow the links for the books to buy them or get more information about them.  Honestly, unless you are a professional[^##propat^], stick with the consumer-grade stuff.  You'll also find a lot more books (and other crap) on more subjects at [[Merch/BurningMindBooks|the Crazymeds bookstore]].
[^##propat Including professional patients. ^]

to:
Here are the key books and papers that comprise the foundation of what we know about neuropsychopharmacology.  As expensive as it is, ''I'' consider paper to be the superior medium.  Follow the links for the books to buy them or get more information about them.   You'll also find a lot more books (and other crap) on more subjects at [[Merch/BurningMindBooks|the Crazymeds bookstore]].
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to:
Honestly, unless you are a professional[^##propat^], stick with the consumer-grade stuff.
Changed lines 44-45 from:
to:
[^##propat Including professional patients. ^]
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to:
Consumer-oriented books have a lot of good information in them.  They're usually a lot more accurate about side effects than the books doctors read.
2014-05-10 by JerodPoore -
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A lot of our information comes from direct personal experience, along with that of our friends, and that of the many people who posted all the incarnations of [[https://crazymeds.net/CrazyTalk|Crazy Talk: the Crazymeds forum]] various online support groups, consumer review sites, and the like - what's known in the trade as anecdotal evidence.  I had thought that all sites about meds skewed negative, but [[http://www.jmir.org/2011/3/e53/|this study]] found that sites run by medical professionals were more neutral-to-positive about meds, so that makes me feel a lot better about the data I've gathered from them[^##fox^].  As I also gather data from sites that have nothing to do with medication and medical conditions, I'm pretty confident about both the size and spectrum of any online sampling I do.  Most of them are not random sites either, but are targeted based on demographic data I've collected since I noticed people with certain brain cooties tend to participate in similar activities or have similar interests, and that some sites about those activities/interests have an off-topic area dedicated to the specific mental health issue (depression, anxiety, etc.), or migraines, epilepsy, whatever.  Of course anyone with some other form of brain cooties would post something in that area, but you get the idea.  I'd give some examples, but since Big Pharma refuses to buy any ads because I am, in the words of one Big Pharma ad buyer, "too unpredictable," I'm not going to give them any leads to a shitload of potential customers for free.
to:
A lot of our information comes from direct personal experience, along with that of our friends, and that of the many people who posted all the incarnations of [[https://crazymeds.net/CrazyTalk|Crazy Talk: the Crazymeds forum]] various online support groups, consumer review sites, and the like - what's known in the trade as anecdotal evidence.  I had thought that all sites about meds skewed negative, but [[http://www.jmir.org/2011/3/e53/|this study]] found that sites run by medical professionals were more neutral-to-positive about meds, so that makes me feel a lot better about the data I've gathered from them[^##fox^].  As I also gather data from sites that have nothing to do with medication and medical conditions, I'm pretty confident about both the size and spectrum of any online sampling I do.  Most of them are not random sites either, but are targeted based on demographic data I've collected since I noticed people with certain brain cooties tend to participate in similar activities or have similar interests, and that some sites about those activities/interests have an off-topic area dedicated to the specific mental health issue (depression, anxiety, etc.), or migraines, epilepsy, whatever.  Of course anyone with some other form of brain cooties would post something in that area, but you get the idea.  I'd give some examples, but since Big Pharma refuses to buy any ads because I am, in the words of one Big Pharma ad buyer, "too unpredictable,"[^##viral^] I'm not going to give them any leads to a shitload of potential customers for free.
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[^##viral And another ad buyer said he didn't want to get a call from the CEO of J&J if one of their banner ads showed up on Crazymeds.  In spite of all the lrrrrv I have for Topamax and Risperdal.  That's on page 32 of ''Beyond Viral'' by Kevin Nalty.  See the page on News, Reviews and Cites for a link, or search Google Books for Crazymeds. ^]
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* Your local hospital.  Or not so local hospital.  Many hospitals have reading libraries full of journals.  While lots of colleges with med schools limit access to students, hospital libraries are usually open to the public.
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* [[http://www9.biostr.washington.edu/cgi-bin/DA/PageMaster?atlas:Neuroanatomy+ffpathIndex:Splash^Page+2|University of Washington's Brain Atlas]] For one of the most respected medical schools in the country, having a section on their site that's a total throwback to 1997 website is surprising.  So if you want brain pictures while feeling nostalgic, or also wanting to see what teh interwebs looked like 20 years ago, this is the place.
to:
* [[http://www9.biostr.washington.edu/cgi-bin/DA/PageMaster?atlas:Neuroanatomy+ffpathIndex:Splash^Page+2|University of Washington's Brain Atlas]] For one of the most respected medical schools in the country, having a section on their site that's a total throwback to 1997 is surprising.  So if you want brain pictures while feeling nostalgic, or also wanting to see what teh interwebs looked like 20 years ago, this is the place.
2014-05-10 by JerodPoore -
Changed line 26 from:
Here are the key books and papers that comprise the foundation of what we know about neuropsychopharmacology.  As expensive as it is, ''I'' consider paper to be the superior medium.  Follow the links for the books to buy them or get more information about them.  Honestly, unless you are a professional[^##propat^], stick with the consumer-grade stuff.  You'll find a lot more books on more subjects at [[Merch/BurningMindBooks|the Crazymeds bookstore]].
to:
Here are the key books and papers that comprise the foundation of what we know about neuropsychopharmacology.  As expensive as it is, ''I'' consider paper to be the superior medium.  Follow the links for the books to buy them or get more information about them.  Honestly, unless you are a professional[^##propat^], stick with the consumer-grade stuff.  You'll also find a lot more books (and other crap) on more subjects at [[Merch/BurningMindBooks|the Crazymeds bookstore]].
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!!!!!Professional-grade Books
to:
!!!!Professional-grade Books
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!
!!!!Consumer-grade Books
to:
!!!!Consumer-grade Books
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!!!!!Papers and Articles Used for Background Information on Numerous Pages
Links will take you to free full text.  If there's no link it's from a journal I have and the full text is not available (see below).
to:
!!!!Papers and Articles Used for Background Information on Numerous Pages
Links will take you to the free full-text.
Changed lines 67-69 from:
!!!!Citable Sites
!!!!!Sources of Free Full-Text Articles and Papers
You might be wondering where
the hell I find all of the free full-text papers and articles[^##terms^] I cite. Here are my favorite sources:
to:
!!!Citable Sites
Want to do some of your own research?  Here are the places either we use all the time, or have recently found and will be using all the time.

!!!!Sources of Free Full-Text Articles and Papers
If you ever wondered where the hell I find all of the free full-text papers and articles[^##terms^], here are my favorite online[^##journals^]
sources:
Changed lines 73-74 from:
to:
[^##journals I also like reading the journals I get from doctors.  So if you don't see a link to the cited source, I read it in an actual ''magazine'' printed on paper.  Or something approximating paper. ^]
Changed lines 81-83 from:
* [[http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/|PubMed]] You want studies, they got studies. Over 14 million citations covering 50 years of research. You'll find the majority of my online cites reference a Pub Med URL.  Especially helpful is [[http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/|PubMed Central]], the repository of full-text articles and online books that are available free of chargeThese are your tax dollars at work, people, make good use of them.
* [[http://www
.plosmedicine.org/home.action|PLoS Medicine]].  The Public Library of Science is another great repository of free, peer-reviewed articles.
* [[http://scholar.google.com/|Google
''Scholar'']].  In case you need the URL spelled out for you: scholar.google.com Note the scholar part.  For anything that may have slipped through the cracks of PubMed and PLoS.  As with PubMed (but not PubMed Central or PLoS), not everything listed as a free full-text article is.  Unlike PubMed, sometimes there are free full-text versions when it looks as if there isn't.  Whenever you see an option for "All # Versions", click it, as there may be a link to a full-text version that didn't make the main page for some reason.  And if that link to a full-text version was a bait'n'switch job, maybe one of the other versions has the full text for free for real.
to:
* [[http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/|PubMed Central]] is the National Institute of Health's repository of full-text articles and even online books that are available free of charge.  These are your tax dollars at work, people, make good use of them.  While part of the same library, don't confuse PubMed Central with its better-know sibling...
** [[http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/|PubMed]].  With over 14 million citations covering 50 years of research, PubMed is a treasure trove of knowledge
.  The only problem is most of it costs money to read.  If you've got the cash or access through a university library, that's great.  Fortunately, you can filter your searches to include only free full-text entries.  They aren't always available for free when they claim to be, but they are far more often than...
* [[http://scholar.google.com/|Google ''Scholar'']].  In case you need the URL spelled out for you: scholar.google.com Note the scholar part.  For anything that may have slipped through the cracks of PubMed and PLoS.  As with PubMed, not everything listed as
a free full-text article is.  Unlike PubMed, sometimes there are free full-text versions when it looks as if there isn't.  Whenever you see an option for "All # Versions", click it, as there may be a link to a full-text version that didn't make the main page for some reason.  And if that link to a full-text version was a bait'n'switch job, maybe one of the other versions has the full text for free for real.
* [[http://www.plosmedicine.org/home.action|PLoS Medicine]].  The Public Library of Science is probably the best-known repository of free, peer-reviewed papers and articles.
Changed lines 87-89 from:
!!!!!Sites with Other Research Material
Not everything useful to know is in the form of a research paper or journal article.  This sites all full of great material, both for general knowledge and very specific data.
to:
!!!!Sites with Other Research Material
Not everything useful to know is in the form of a research paper or journal article.  These sites are full of great material, both for general knowledge and very specific data.
Added lines 100-102:

!!!!This is Your Brain on Candid Camera
Many of the conditions and treatments we deal with often involve specific areas of the brain.  Here are some places to help find your way around your head.
Changed lines 104-107 from:
* [[http://www.med.harvard.edu/AANLIB/home.html|Pretty pictures of brains via neuroimaging]].

If all of that weren't enough for you, [[http://faculty.gvsu.edu/capodilj/toppage11.htm|here's a big list of neuroscience-related sites]]. 
to:
* [[http://www.med.harvard.edu/AANLIB/home.html|Whole Brain Atlas]] Pretty pictures of brains via neuroimaging.
* [[https://www.msu.edu/~brains/brains/human/index.html|Michigan State Human Brain Atlas]]
* [[http://www9.biostr.washington.edu/cgi-bin/DA/PageMaster?atlas:Neuroanatomy+ffpathIndex:Splash^Page+2|University of Washington's Brain Atlas]] For one of the most respected medical schools in the country, having a section on their site that's a total throwback to 1997 website is surprising.  So if you want brain pictures while feeling nostalgic, or also wanting to see what teh interwebs looked like 20 years ago, this is the place.

!!!!Lists of Even More Sites
Still not satisfied?  Can't I do anything right?
* [[http://faculty.gvsu.edu/capodilj/toppage11.htm|a big list of neuroscience-related sites]]. 
* [[http://www.neuroguide.com/bestbets.html|Neurosciences on the Internet]].
* [[http://hardinmd.lib.uiowa.edu/brainpictures.html|University of Iowa's Hardin Library for the Health Sciences list of brain atlases]]. Because you can never have too many brain pictures.

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!!!!Pictures Worth Millions of Words
to:
!!!Pictures Worth Millions of Words
2014-05-10 by JerodPoore -
Changed lines 26-28 from:
Here are the key books and papers that comprise the foundation of what we know about neuropsychopharmacology.  As expensive as it is, ''I'' consider paper to be the superior medium.  Follow the links for the books to buy them or get more information about them.  Honestly, unless you are a professional[^##propat], stick with the consumer-grade stuff.  You'll find a lot more books on more subjects at [[Merch/BurningMindBooks|the Crazymeds bookstore]].
[^##propat Including professional patients.]
to:
Here are the key books and papers that comprise the foundation of what we know about neuropsychopharmacology.  As expensive as it is, ''I'' consider paper to be the superior medium.  Follow the links for the books to buy them or get more information about them.  Honestly, unless you are a professional[^##propat^], stick with the consumer-grade stuff.  You'll find a lot more books on more subjects at [[Merch/BurningMindBooks|the Crazymeds bookstore]].
[^##propat Including professional patients. ^]
Added line 74:
** [[http://highwire.stanford.edu/lists/freeart.dtl|Standford University's Highwire]] over 2 million papers available.
Changed lines 78-89 from:
*** [[http://highwire.stanford.edu/lists/freeart.dtl|Standford University's Highwire]] over 2 million papers available.
***
[[http://arrowsmith.psych.uic.edu/arrowsmith_uic/tools.html|And a bunch of tools to make mining The Literature easier]]


[[http://www
.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/|PubMed]] You want studies, they got studies. Over 14 million citations covering 50 years of research. You'll find the majority of my online cites reference a Pub Med URL.  Especially helpful is [[http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/|PubMed Central]], the repository of full-text articles and online books that are available free of chargeThese are your tax dollars at work, people, make good use of them.

[[http://www.plosmedicine.org/home.action|PLoS Medicine]].  The Public Library of Science is another great repository of free, peer-reviewed articles.

[[http://scholar.google.com/|Google ''Scholar'']].  In case you need the URL spelled out for you: scholar
.google.com Note the scholar part.  For anything that may have slipped through the cracks of PubMed and PLoS.  As with PubMed (but not PubMed Central or PLoS), not everything listed as a free full-text article is.  Unlike PubMed, sometimes there are free full-text versions when it looks as if there isn't.  Whenever you see an option for "All # Versions", click it, as there may be a link to a full-text version that didn't make the main page for some reason.  And if that link to a full-text version was a bait'n'switch job, maybe one of the other versions has the full text for free for real. 

[[http://www.preskorn.com/|Sheldon Preskorn's Applied Clinical Psychopharmacology]] Dr. Preskorn has authored over 300 scientific and professional articles, and many of them are available at this site, which is full of useful psychopharmacological data involving drug-drug interactions, methods of actions, clinical efficacies, pharmacokinetics and more written in a fairly accessible way.  Dr. Preskorn has received continuous grant funding since 1978 for studies in the areas of psychopharmacology, neuroscience, and psychiatric illnesses.  While most of the articles are at least ten years old, Dr. Preskorn is still publishing papers, so we might be seeing new material eventually.  Regardless, he covers the basics of psychopharmacology in a way that makes sense, and the basics haven't changed much.
to:
** [[http://arrowsmith.psych.uic.edu/arrowsmith_uic/tools.html|And a bunch of tools to make mining The Literature easier]]
*
[[http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/|PubMed]] You want studies, they got studies. Over 14 million citations covering 50 years of research. You'll find the majority of my online cites reference a Pub Med URL.  Especially helpful is [[http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/|PubMed Central]], the repository of full-text articles and online books that are available free of charge.  These are your tax dollars at work, people, make good use of them.
* [[http://www.plosmedicine.org/home.action|PLoS Medicine]].  The Public Library of Science is another great repository of free, peer-reviewed articles.
* [[http://scholar.google.com/|Google ''Scholar'']].  In case you need the URL spelled out for you: scholar.google.com Note the scholar partFor anything that may have slipped through the cracks of PubMed and PLoS.  As with PubMed (but not PubMed Central or PLoS), not everything listed as a free full-text article is.  Unlike PubMed, sometimes there are free full-text versions when it looks as if there isn't.  Whenever you see an option for "All # Versions", click it, as there may be a link to a full-text version that didn't make the main page for some reason.  And if that link to a full-text version was a bait'n'switch job, maybe one of the other versions has the full text for free for real. 
*
[[http://www.preskorn.com/|Sheldon Preskorn's Applied Clinical Psychopharmacology]] Dr. Preskorn has authored over 300 scientific and professional articles, and many of them are available at this site, which is full of useful psychopharmacological data involving drug-drug interactions, methods of actions, clinical efficacies, pharmacokinetics and more written in a fairly accessible way.  Dr. Preskorn has received continuous grant funding since 1978 for studies in the areas of psychopharmacology, neuroscience, and psychiatric illnesses.  While most of the articles are at least ten years old, Dr. Preskorn is still publishing papers, so we might be seeing new material eventually.  Regardless, he covers the basics of psychopharmacology in a way that makes sense, and the basics haven't changed much.
Changed line 87 from:
(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://pdsp.med.unc.edu/kidb.php|The PDSP K'_i_' database]](=html=)</span>(=htmlend=) All K'_i_' values, all the time.  These are the ''raw numbers'' used to determine the ''potency'' of certain aspects of the freebase form (E.g.: paroxetine, but what is actually in a pill of Paxil is paroxetine HCl; while Tegretol is full of freebase carbamazepine) such as neurotransmitter reuptake inhibition.
to:
* (=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://pdsp.med.unc.edu/kidb.php|The PDSP K'_i_' database]](=html=)</span>(=htmlend=) All K'_i_' values, all the time.  These are the ''raw numbers'' used to determine the ''potency'' of certain aspects of the freebase form (E.g.: paroxetine, but what is actually in a pill of Paxil is paroxetine HCl; while Tegretol is full of freebase carbamazepine) such as neurotransmitter reuptake inhibition.
Changed lines 92-103 from:

[[http://neuroscience.uth.tmc.edu/index.htm|Neuroscience Online, the Open-Access Neuroscience Electronic Textbook]] From the University of Texas, one of the best places on the planet for the study of psychiatric and neurological conditions.  Making this combination text book and lecture series available for free is as awesome as its contents.

[[http://www.globalrph.com/|Global RPh]] - I don't know if they have everything you need to pass the MCATs and get you through medical school, but it sure seems that way.

[[http://umm.edu/health/medical|University of Maryland's Medical Reference Guide]] "Guide" is an understatement, as it includes a medical encyclopedia, patient education information that people should be reading instead of that crap on WebMD, and what has to be the best Complementary and Alternative Medicine Guide on the planet.  Just ignore that truly worthless drug-drug interaction checker.

[[http://www.wikidoc.org/index.php/Main_Page|WikiDoc]]  Imagine what Wikipedia was supposed to be. Only written by doctors.

[[http://www.chemspider.com/|ChemSpider]] Close to, maybe even everything you ever wanted to know about the active ingredient in a med.  It's all about the patentable molecules.

[[http://www.brainfacts.org/|Brain Facts]] Basic brain stuff
.
to:
* [[http://neuroscience.uth.tmc.edu/index.htm|Neuroscience Online, the Open-Access Neuroscience Electronic Textbook]] From the University of Texas, one of the best places on the planet for the study of psychiatric and neurological conditions.  Making this combination text book and lecture series available for free is as awesome as its contents.
* [[http://www.globalrph.com/|Global RPh]] - I don't know if they have everything you need to pass the MCATs and get you through medical school, but it sure seems that way.
* [[http://umm.edu/health/medical|University of Maryland's Medical Reference Guide]] "Guide" is an understatement, as it includes a medical encyclopedia, patient education information that people should be reading instead of that crap on WebMD, and what has to be the best Complementary and Alternative Medicine Guide on the planet.  Just ignore that truly worthless drug-drug interaction checker.
* [[http://www.wikidoc.org/index.php/Main_Page|WikiDoc]]  Imagine what Wikipedia was supposed to be. Only written by doctors.
* [[http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/index.html|Merck Manuals]] Because some things ''never'' go out of date.
* [[http://www.chemspider.com/|ChemSpider]] Close to, maybe even everything you ever wanted to know
about the active ingredient in a med.  It's all about the patentable molecules.
* [[http://www.brainfacts.org/|Brain Facts]] Basic brain stuff.
* [[http://www.med.harvard.edu/AANLIB/home.html|Pretty pictures of brains via neuroimaging]]
.
2014-05-10 by JerodPoore -
Changed lines 26-27 from:
Here are the key books and papers that comprise the foundation of what we know about neuropsychopharmacology.  As expensive as it is, ''I'' consider paper to be the superior medium.  Follow the links for the books to buy them or get more information about them.  Honestly, unless you are a professional, stick with the consumer-grade stuff.  You'll find a lot more books on more subjects at [[Merch/BurningMindBooks|the Crazymeds bookstore]].
to:
Here are the key books and papers that comprise the foundation of what we know about neuropsychopharmacology.  As expensive as it is, ''I'' consider paper to be the superior medium.  Follow the links for the books to buy them or get more information about them.  Honestly, unless you are a professional[^##propat], stick with the consumer-grade stuff.  You'll find a lot more books on more subjects at [[Merch/BurningMindBooks|the Crazymeds bookstore]].
[^##propat Including professional patients.]

Changed lines 30-56 from:
[[Cite:0521673763|''Stahl's Essential Psychopharmacology: Neuroscientific Basis and Practical Applications (Essential Psychopharmacology Series)'' Third edition  by Stephen M. Stahl © 2008]]  Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].

[[Cite:1429233435|''Primer of Drug Action'' 12th edition by Robert M. Julien Ph.D, Claire D. Advokat, Joseph Comaty © 2011]]  Published by [[http://www.worthpublishers.com/|Worth Publishers]].

[[Cite:0521173647|''The Prescriber's Guide (Essential Psychopharmacology Series)'' Third edition by Stephen Stahl © 2009]] Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].

[[Cite:0889373957|''Clinical Handbook of Psychotropic Drugs'' 18th edition Adil S. Virani, K. Bezchlibnyk-Butler, J. Jeffries © 2009 Published by Hogrefe & Huber Publishers]].

[[Cite:0521136725|''Essential Neuropharmacology: The Prescriber's Guide'' Stephen D. Silberstein, Michael J. Marmura © 2010]] Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].

[[Cite:0521531888|''Evidence-based Psychopharmacology'' Dan Stein, Bernard Lerer, Stephen Stahl © 2005]] Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].

[[Cite:1416030743|''Clinical Neurology for Psychiatrists'' David Myland Kaufman MD © 2001 W.B. Saunders Company]]. An imprint of [[http://www.elsevierhealth.com/|Elsevier]]

[[Cite:0781723213|''Antiepileptic Drugs'' René H. Levy, Richard H. Mattson, Brian S. Meldrum, Emilio Perucca © 2003]]

[[Cite:0880488859|''Pharmacotherapy for Mood, Anxiety, and Cognitive Disorders'' Stuart A. Montgomery, Halbreich Uriel © 2000]] Published by [[http://www.appi.org|American Psychiatric Publishing]].

[[Cite:0323040586|''Mosby's Drug Consult 2007'' (Generic Prescription Physician's Reference Book Series)]] © 2007 An imprint of [[http://www.elsevierhealth.com/|Elsevier]]. The final edition, unfortunately.

[[Cite:1563638002|''PDR: Physicians' Desk Reference 2010'' 64th edition]] back through to 53rd edition of 1999.  Old copies of the ''PDR'' come in handy for PI sheets that are no longer available and difficult to find, as well as to track the changes in both indications and adverse effects.

[[Cite:0898626749|''Handbook of Affective Disorders'' edited by Eugene S. Paykel, MD FRCPsych]]

(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)''The New Chemotherapy in Mental Illness'' edited by Hirsch L. Gordon MD, Ph.D, FAPA © 1958 Philosophical Library, Inc.  Published by Philosophical Library(=html=)</span>(=htmlend=)

to:
 
*
[[Cite:0521673763|''Stahl's Essential Psychopharmacology: Neuroscientific Basis and Practical Applications (Essential Psychopharmacology Series)'' Third edition  by Stephen M. Stahl © 2008]]  Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].
* [[Cite:1429233435|''Primer of Drug Action'' 12th edition by Robert M. Julien Ph.D, Claire D. Advokat, Joseph Comaty © 2011]]  Published by [[http://www.worthpublishers.com/|Worth Publishers]].
* [[Cite:0521173647|''The Prescriber's Guide (Essential Psychopharmacology Series)'' Third edition by Stephen Stahl © 2009]] Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].
* [[Cite:0889373957|''Clinical Handbook of Psychotropic Drugs'' 18th edition Adil S. Virani, K. Bezchlibnyk-Butler, J. Jeffries © 2009 Published by Hogrefe & Huber Publishers]].
* [[Cite:0521136725|''Essential Neuropharmacology: The Prescriber's Guide'' Stephen D. Silberstein, Michael J. Marmura © 2010]] Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].
* [[Cite:0521531888|''Evidence-based Psychopharmacology'' Dan Stein, Bernard Lerer, Stephen Stahl © 2005]] Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].
* [[Cite:1416030743|''Clinical Neurology for Psychiatrists'' David Myland Kaufman MD © 2001 W.B. Saunders Company]]. An imprint of [[http://www.elsevierhealth.com/|Elsevier]]
* [[Cite:0781723213|''Antiepileptic Drugs'' René H. Levy, Richard H. Mattson, Brian S. Meldrum, Emilio Perucca © 2003]]
* [[Cite:0880488859|''Pharmacotherapy for Mood, Anxiety, and Cognitive Disorders'' Stuart A. Montgomery, Halbreich Uriel © 2000]] Published by [[http://www.appi.org|American Psychiatric Publishing]].
* [[Cite:0323040586|''Mosby's Drug Consult 2007'' (Generic Prescription Physician's Reference Book Series)]] © 2007 An imprint of [[http://www.elsevierhealth.com/|Elsevier]]. The final edition, unfortunately.
* [[Cite:1563638002|''PDR: Physicians' Desk Reference 2010'' 64th edition]] back through to 53rd edition of 1999.  Old copies of the ''PDR'' come in handy for PI sheets that are no longer available and difficult to find, as well as to track the changes in both indications and adverse effects.
* [[Cite:0898626749|''Handbook of Affective Disorders'' edited by Eugene S. Paykel, MD FRCPsych]]
* (=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)''The New Chemotherapy in Mental Illness'' edited by Hirsch L. Gordon MD, Ph.D, FAPA © 1958 Philosophical Library, Inc.  Published by Philosophical Library(=html=)</span>(=htmlend=)

Changed lines 47-55 from:

[[Cite:0393705668|''Instant Psychopharmacology'' 2nd Edition Ronald J. Diamond MD © 2002. Published by W.W. Norton]].

[[Cite:0060897422|''Living Well with Depression and Bipolar Disorder: What Your Doctor Doesn't Tell You...That You Need to Know'' John McManamy]]

[[Cite:1606235427|''The Bipolar Disorder Survival Guide'' David J. Miklowitz, Ph.D © 2002. Published by The Guilford Press]].

[[Cite:047175062X|''The Complete Guide to Psychiatric Drugs'' Edward Drummond, MD © 2000. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.]]
to:
 
*
[[Cite:0393705668|''Instant Psychopharmacology'' 2nd Edition Ronald J. Diamond MD © 2002. Published by W.W. Norton]].
* [[Cite:0060897422|''Living Well with Depression and Bipolar Disorder: What Your Doctor Doesn't Tell You...That You Need to Know'' John McManamy]]
* [[Cite:1606235427|''The Bipolar Disorder Survival Guide'' David J. Miklowitz, Ph.D © 2002. Published by The Guilford Press]].
* [[Cite:047175062X|''The Complete Guide to Psychiatric Drugs'' Edward Drummond, MD © 2000. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.]]
Changed lines 55-61 from:

(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/444804|Genetic Basis of Drug Metabolism]](=html=)</span>(=htmlend=)

(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0004-282X2003000400008&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en|Is low antiepileptic drug dose effective in long-term seizure-free patients?]](=html=)</span>(=htmlend=) Tânia A.M.O. Cardoso; Fernando Cendes; Carlos A.M. Guerreiro  ''Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria'' vol.61 no.3A  Sept. 2003

(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[https://www.dovepress.com/getfile.php?fileID=11237|Monoamine depletion by reuptake inhibitors]](=html=)</span>(=htmlend=) Marty Hinz; Alvin Stein; Thomas Uncini ''Drug, Healthcare and Patient Safety'', October 2011 - Dove Press
to:
 
*
(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/444804|Genetic Basis of Drug Metabolism]](=html=)</span>(=htmlend=)
* (=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0004-282X2003000400008&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en|Is low antiepileptic drug dose effective in long-term seizure-free patients?]](=html=)</span>(=htmlend=) Tânia A.M.O. Cardoso; Fernando Cendes; Carlos A.M. Guerreiro  ''Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria'' vol.61 no.3A  Sept. 2003
* (=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[https://www.dovepress.com/getfile.php?fileID=11237|Monoamine depletion by reuptake inhibitors]](=html=)</span>(=htmlend=) Marty Hinz; Alvin Stein; Thomas Uncini ''Drug, Healthcare and Patient Safety'', October 2011 - Dove Press
Changed lines 73-79 from:
[[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/index.php|Neurotransmitter.net]] Tons of information and research on psychiatric and neurological conditions, the drugs that treat them, and the rating scales used to measure the efficacy of said drugs.  All neatly indexed and categorized to make it easy to make sense of a bunch of diverse information. I had no idea [[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/hangover.html|how much research was being done on hangovers]] until I hit this site.  I knew doctors liked to party (considering that my stepfather is a vascular surgeon I had a first-hand look at how much doctors liked to party), but who knew they were getting grant money for it?  A key site for patients, students and, most importantly, doctors of all stripes, shapes and sizes.
to:
* [[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/index.php|Neurotransmitter.net]] Tons of information and research on psychiatric and neurological conditions, the drugs that treat them, the rating scales used to measure the efficacy of said drugs, and much, much more.  All neatly indexed and categorized to make it easy to make sense of a bunch of diverse information. I had no idea [[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/hangover.html|how much research was being done on hangovers]] until I hit this site.  I knew doctors liked to party (considering that my stepfather is a vascular surgeon I had a first-hand look at how much doctors liked to party), but who knew they were getting grant money for it?  A key site for patients, students and, most importantly, doctors of all stripes, shapes and sizes.  Not only that, Shawn has [[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/biology_links.html|links to tons of other sites offering free full-text papers]] including:
** [[http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/collection|''Science'' magazine's collections]]. Of special interest to us - under Life Sciences - are their collections of papers on
*** [[http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/collection/neuroscience|Neruoscience]]
*** [[http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/collection/pharm_tox|Pharmacology & Toxicology]] the fearmongers must love that common pairing
*** [[http://highwire.stanford.edu/lists/freeart.dtl|Standford University's Highwire]] over 2 million papers available.
*** [[http://arrowsmith.psych.uic.edu/arrowsmith_uic/tools.html|And a bunch of tools to make mining The Literature easier]]

2014-05-07 by JerodPoore -
Changed lines 87-88 from:
[[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/|Neurotransmitter.net]] Tons of information and research on psychiatric and neurological conditions, the drugs that treat them, and the rating scales used to measure the efficacy of said drugs.  All neatly indexed and categorized to make it easy to make sense of a bunch of diverse information. I had no idea [[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/hangover.html|how much research was being done on hangovers]] until I hit this site.  I knew doctors liked to party (considering that my stepfather is a vascular surgeon I had a first-hand look at how much doctors liked to party), but who knew they were getting grant money for it?  A key site for patients, students and, most importantly, doctors of all stripes, shapes and sizes.
to:

[[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/index.php|Neurotransmitter.net]] Tons of information and research on psychiatric and neurological conditions, the drugs that treat them, and the rating scales used to measure the efficacy of said drugs.  All neatly indexed and categorized to make it easy to make sense of a bunch of diverse information. I had no idea [[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/hangover.html|how much research was being done on hangovers]] until I hit this site.  I knew doctors liked to party (considering that my stepfather is a vascular surgeon I had a first-hand look at how much doctors liked to party), but who knew they were getting grant money for it?  A key site for patients, students and, most importantly, doctors of all stripes, shapes and sizes.
Added lines 118-119:

If all of that weren't enough for you, [[http://faculty.gvsu.edu/capodilj/toppage11.htm|here's a big list of neuroscience-related sites]]. 
2014-05-06 by JerodPoore -
Changed lines 95-102 from:


[[http://www.preskorn.com/|Sheldon Preskorn's Applied Clinical Psychopharmacology]] Dr. Preskorn has authored
over 300 scientific and professional articles, and many of them are available at this site, which is full of useful psychopharmacological data involving drug-drug interactions, methods of actions, clinical efficacies, pharmacokinetics and more written in a fairly accessible way.  Dr. Preskorn has received continuous grant funding since 1978 for studies in the areas of psychopharmacology, neuroscience, and psychiatric illnesses.  While most of the articles are at least ten years old, Dr. Preskorn is still publishing papers, so we might be seeing new material eventually.  Regardless, he covers the basics of psychopharmacology in a way that makes sense, and the basics haven't changed much.


(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://pdsp.med.unc.edu/kidb.php|The PDSP K'_i_' database]](=html=)</span>(=htmlend=) All K'_i_' values, all the time.  These are the ''raw numbers'' used to determine the ''potency'' of certain aspects of the freebase form (E.g.: paroxetine, but what is actually in a pill of Paxil is paroxetine HCl; while Tegretol is full of freebase carbamazepine) such as neurotransmitter reuptake inhibition. Potency has nothing to do with efficacy.
to:
[[http://www.preskorn.com/|Sheldon Preskorn's Applied Clinical Psychopharmacology]] Dr. Preskorn has authored over 300 scientific and professional articles, and many of them are available at this site, which is full of useful psychopharmacological data involving drug-drug interactions, methods of actions, clinical efficacies, pharmacokinetics and more written in a fairly accessible way.  Dr. Preskorn has received continuous grant funding since 1978 for studies in the areas of psychopharmacology, neuroscience, and psychiatric illnesses.  While most of the articles are at least ten years old, Dr. Preskorn is still publishing papers, so we might be seeing new material eventually.  Regardless, he covers the basics of psychopharmacology in a way that makes sense, and the basics haven't changed much.

!!!!!Sites with Other Research Material
Not everything useful to know is in the form of a research paper or journal article.  This sites all full
of great material, both for general knowledge and very specific data.

(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://pdsp.med.unc.edu/kidb.php|The PDSP K'_i_' database]](=html=)</span>(=htmlend=) All K'_i_' values, all the time.  These are the ''raw numbers'' used to determine the ''potency'' of certain aspects of the freebase form (E
.g.: paroxetine, but what is actually in a pill of Paxil is paroxetine HCl; while Tegretol is full of freebase carbamazepine) such as neurotransmitter reuptake inhibition.
>>important<<
I cannot stress this enough: Potency and efficacy are two very different things.
>><<
>>font-family:verdana font-size:4<<

Deleted lines 113-114:
[[http://ktclearinghouse.ca/cebm|Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine]]
Changed line 116 from:
[[http://www.brainfacts.org/|Brain Facts]]
to:
[[http://www.brainfacts.org/|Brain Facts]] Basic brain stuff.
2014-05-06 by JerodPoore -
Changed line 21 from:
We also sit on our asses all day long and do a bunch of research. We find a study that is of interest and we put a link to it or an article about it within the page on the med in question. So there are many specific articles and studies that we've referenced throughout this site, either by direct link to the source (when available online) or by quaint footnotes (when we read it in something not available online). However there are a few works that we've built upon as a foundation, and that we also reference to check on certain things. This isn't a static list. Paper is by far the superior medium, expensive though it may be.
to:
We also sit on our asses all day long and do a bunch of research. We find a study that is of interest and we put a link to it or an article about it within the page on the med in question. So there are many specific articles and studies that we've referenced throughout this site, either by direct link to the source (when available online) or by quaint footnotes (when we read it in something not available online). However there are a few works that we've built upon as a foundation, and that we also reference to check on certain things. This isn't a static list.
Deleted lines 22-23:
Here are the key books, papers, and sites that comprise the foundation of what we know about neuropsychopharmacology. 
Added lines 24-28:
!!!!!Books, Articles, and Other Paperwork

Here are the key books and papers that comprise the foundation of what we know about neuropsychopharmacology.  As expensive as it is, ''I'' consider paper to be the superior medium.  Follow the links for the books to buy them or get more information about them.  Honestly, unless you are a professional, stick with the consumer-grade stuff.  You'll find a lot more books on more subjects at [[Merch/BurningMindBooks|the Crazymeds bookstore]].

!!!!!Professional-grade Books
Deleted lines 38-39:
[[Cite:0323040586|''Mosby's Drug Consult 2007'' (Generic Prescription Physician's Reference Book Series)]] © 2007 An imprint of [[http://www.elsevierhealth.com/|Elsevier]]. Also the 2004 edition, but only on pages that haven't been fully updated yet.
Added lines 41-42:
[[Cite:1416030743|''Clinical Neurology for Psychiatrists'' David Myland Kaufman MD © 2001 W.B. Saunders Company]]. An imprint of [[http://www.elsevierhealth.com/|Elsevier]]
Deleted lines 44-45:
[[Cite:0393705668|''Instant Psychopharmacology'' 2nd Edition Ronald J. Diamond MD © 2002. Published by W.W. Norton]].
Changed lines 47-48 from:
[[Cite:047175062X|''The Complete Guide to Psychiatric Drugs'' Edward Drummond, MD © 2000. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.]]
to:
[[Cite:0323040586|''Mosby's Drug Consult 2007'' (Generic Prescription Physician's Reference Book Series)]] © 2007 An imprint of [[http://www.elsevierhealth.com/|Elsevier]]. The final edition, unfortunately.
Deleted lines 50-51:
[[Cite:1606235427|''The Bipolar Disorder Survival Guide'' David J. Miklowitz, Ph.D © 2002. Published by The Guilford Press]].
Deleted lines 52-55:
[[Cite:0060897422|''Living Well with Depression and Bipolar Disorder: What Your Doctor Doesn't Tell You...That You Need to Know'' John McManamy]]

[[Cite:1416030743|''Clinical Neurology for Psychiatrists'' David Myland Kaufman MD © 2001 W.B. Saunders Company]]. An imprint of [[http://www.elsevierhealth.com/|Elsevier]]

Changed lines 55-56 from:
!!!!!Papers and articles used for background information on numerous pages
to:

!!!!!Consumer-grade Books

[[Cite:0393705668|''Instant Psychopharmacology'' 2nd Edition Ronald J. Diamond MD © 2002. Published by W.W. Norton]].

[[Cite:0060897422|''Living Well with Depression and Bipolar Disorder: What Your Doctor Doesn't Tell You...That You Need to Know'' John McManamy]]

[[Cite:1606235427|''The Bipolar Disorder Survival Guide'' David J. Miklowitz, Ph.D © 2002. Published by The Guilford Press]].

[[Cite:047175062X|''The Complete Guide to Psychiatric Drugs'' Edward Drummond, MD © 2000. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.]]

!!!!!Papers and Articles Used for Background Information on Numerous Pages
Links will take you to free full text.  If there's no link it's from a journal I have and the full text is not available (see below).

Changed lines 84-92 from:
If you're more of a cheapskate than I am, here are some awesome online resources.

[[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/|Neurotransmitter.net]] Tons of information and research
on psychiatric and neurological conditions, the drugs that treat them, and
the rating scales used to measure the efficacy of said drugs.  All neatly indexed and categorized to make it easy to make sense of a bunch of diverse information. I had no idea [[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/hangover.html|how much research was being done on hangovers]] until I hit this site.  I knew doctors liked to party (considering that my stepfather is a vascular surgeon I had a first-hand look at how much doctors liked to party), but who knew they were
getting grant money for it?  A key site for patients, students and, most importantly, doctors of all stripes, shapes and sizes
.

[[http://www.preskorn.com/|Sheldon Preskorn's Applied Clinical Psychopharmacology]] Dr. Preskorn has authored
over 300 scientific and professional articles,
and many of them are available at this site, which is full of useful psychopharmacological data involving drug-drug interactions, methods of actions, clinical efficacies, pharmacokinetics and more written in a fairly accessible way.  Dr. Preskorn has received continuous grant funding since 1978 for studies in the areas of psychopharmacology, neuroscience, and psychiatric illnesses.  While most of the articles are at least ten years old, Dr. Preskorn is still publishing papers, so we might be seeing new material eventually.  Regardless, he covers the basics of psychopharmacology in a way that makes sense, and the basics haven't changed much.
to:
!!!!!Sources of Free Full-Text Articles and Papers
You might be wondering where the hell I find all of the free full-text papers and articles
[^##terms^] I cite. Here are my favorite sources:
[^##terms Some terminology for beginning researchers.  "Free full-text" means all of
the ''text'' of something that is in a printed journal is available online for free.  All of the diagrams, charts, photos, etc. are almost always included these days, but there's no guarantee with older papers.  Plus some data aren't included in either when research is carried out using the resources (cash and/or data) of drug companies.  Articles and papers are two different things.  Papers are the result of original (or 'original') research, articles are everything else.  Articles have plenty of value, as they can quote data from recently published research papers that aren't currently available online. ^]
[[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/|Neurotransmitter.net]] Tons of information and research on psychiatric and neurological conditions, the drugs that treat them, and the rating scales used to measure the efficacy of said drugs.  All neatly indexed and categorized to make it easy to make sense of a bunch of diverse information. I had no idea [[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/hangover.html|how much research was being done on hangovers]] until I hit this site.  I knew doctors liked to party (considering that my stepfather is a vascular surgeon I had a first-hand look at how much doctors liked to party), but who knew they were getting grant money for it?  A key site for patients, students and, most importantly, doctors of all stripes, shapes and sizes.
Changed lines 93-94 from:
[[http://scholar.google.com/|Google Scholar]].  For anything that may have slipped through the cracks of PubMed and PLoS.  As with PubMed (but not PubMed Central or PLoS), not everything listed as a free full-text article isUnlike PubMed, sometimes there are free full-text versions when it looks as if there isn't.  Whenever you see an option for "All # Versions", click it, as there may be a link to a full-text version that didn't make the main page for some reason.  And if that link to a full-text version was a bait'n'switch job, maybe one of the other versions has the full text for free for real.
to:
[[http://scholar.google.com/|Google ''Scholar'']].  In case you need the URL spelled out for you: scholar.google.com Note the scholar part.  For anything that may have slipped through the cracks of PubMed and PLoSAs with PubMed (but not PubMed Central or PLoS), not everything listed as a free full-text article is.  Unlike PubMed, sometimes there are free full-text versions when it looks as if there isn't.  Whenever you see an option for "All # Versions", click it, as there may be a link to a full-text version that didn't make the main page for some reason.  And if that link to a full-text version was a bait'n'switch job, maybe one of the other versions has the full text for free for real. 



[[http://www.preskorn.com/|Sheldon Preskorn's Applied Clinical Psychopharmacology]] Dr. Preskorn has authored
over 300 scientific and professional articles, and many of them are available at this site, which is full of useful psychopharmacological data involving drug-drug interactions, methods of actions, clinical efficacies, pharmacokinetics and more written in a fairly accessible way.  Dr. Preskorn has received continuous grant funding since 1978 for studies in the areas of psychopharmacology, neuroscience, and psychiatric illnesses.  While most of the articles are at least ten years old, Dr. Preskorn is still publishing papers, so we might be seeing new material eventually.  Regardless, he covers the basics of psychopharmacology in a way that makes sense, and the basics haven't changed much.


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[[http://www.wikidoc.org/index.php/Main_Page|wiki.doc]]  Imagine what Wikipedia was supposed to be. Only written by doctors.
to:
[[http://www.wikidoc.org/index.php/Main_Page|WikiDoc]]  Imagine what Wikipedia was supposed to be. Only written by doctors.
2014-05-04 by JerodPoore -
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to:
!!!!!Papers and articles used for background information on numerous pages

(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/444804|Genetic Basis of Drug Metabolism]](=html=)</span>(=htmlend=)

(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0004-282X2003000400008&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en|Is low antiepileptic drug dose effective in long-term seizure-free patients?]](=html=)</span>(=htmlend=) Tânia A.M.O. Cardoso; Fernando Cendes; Carlos A.M. Guerreiro  ''Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria'' vol.61 no.3A  Sept. 2003

(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[https://www.dovepress.com/getfile.php?fileID=11237|Monoamine depletion by reuptake inhibitors]](=html=)</span>(=htmlend=) Marty Hinz; Alvin Stein; Thomas Uncini ''Drug, Healthcare and Patient Safety'', October 2011 - Dove Press

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(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://neuroscience.uth.tmc.edu/index.htm|Neuroscience Online, the Open-Access Neuroscience Electronic Textbook]](=html=)</span>(=htmlend=) From the University of Texas, one of the best places on the planet for the study of psychiatric and neurological conditions.  Making this combination text book and lecture series available for free is as awesome as its contents.

[[http://ktclearinghouse.ca/cebm|Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine]]

to:
[[http://neuroscience.uth.tmc.edu/index.htm|Neuroscience Online, the Open-Access Neuroscience Electronic Textbook]] From the University of Texas, one of the best places on the planet for the study of psychiatric and neurological conditions.  Making this combination text book and lecture series available for free is as awesome as its contents.
Changed lines 98-102 from:
(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/444804|Genetic Basis of Drug Metabolism]](=html=)</span>(=htmlend=)

(=html=)<span itemprop=
"citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0004-282X2003000400008&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en|Is low antiepileptic drug dose effective in long-term seizure-free patients?]](=html=)</span>(=htmlend=) Tânia A.M.O. Cardoso; Fernando Cendes; Carlos A.M. Guerreiro  ''Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria'' vol.61 no.3A  Sept. 2003

(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[https://www.dovepress.com/getfile.php?fileID=11237|Monoamine depletion by reuptake inhibitors]](=html=)</span>(=htmlend=) Marty Hinz; Alvin Stein; Thomas Uncini ''Drug, Healthcare and Patient Safety'', October 2011
- Dove Press
to:
[[http://umm.edu/health/medical|University of Maryland's Medical Reference Guide]] "Guide" is an understatement, as it includes a medical encyclopedia, patient education information that people should be reading instead of that crap on WebMD, and what has to be the best Complementary and Alternative Medicine Guide on the planet.  Just ignore that truly worthless drug-drug interaction checker.

[[http://www.wikidoc.org/index.php/Main_Page|wiki.doc]]  Imagine what Wikipedia was supposed to be. Only written by doctors.

[[http://ktclearinghouse.ca/cebm|Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine]]

[[http://www.chemspider.com/|ChemSpider]] Close to, maybe even everything you ever wanted to know about the active ingredient in a med.  It's all about the patentable molecules.
2014-05-04 by JerodPoore -
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(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0521673763|''Stahl's Essential Psychopharmacology: Neuroscientific Basis and Practical Applications (Essential Psychopharmacology Series)'']] Third edition  by Stephen M. Stahl © 2008  Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].(=html=)</span>(=htmlend=)
to:
[[Cite:0521673763|''Stahl's Essential Psychopharmacology: Neuroscientific Basis and Practical Applications (Essential Psychopharmacology Series)'' Third edition  by Stephen M. Stahl © 2008]]  Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].
Changed lines 28-56 from:
(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/1429233435|''Primer of Drug Action'']] 12th edition by Robert M. Julien Ph.D, Claire D. Advokat, Joseph Comaty © 2011  Published by [[http://www.worthpublishers.com/|Worth Publishers]].(=html=)</span>(=htmlend=)

(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)
[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0521173647|''The Prescriber's Guide (Essential Psychopharmacology Series)'']] Third edition by Stephen Stahl © 2009 Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].(=html=)</span>(=htmlend=)

(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)
[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0889373957|''Clinical Handbook of Psychotropic Drugs'']] 18th edition Adil S. Virani, K. Bezchlibnyk-Butler, J. Jeffries © 2009 Published by Hogrefe & Huber Publishers.(=html=)</span>(=htmlend=)

(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0521136725|''Essential Neuropharmacology: The Prescriber's Guide'']] Stephen D. Silberstein, Michael J. Marmura © 2010 Published by
[[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].(=html=)</span>(=htmlend=)

(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)
[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0323040586|''Mosby's Drug Consult 2007'' (Generic Prescription Physician's Reference Book Series)]] © 2007 An imprint of [[http://www.elsevierhealth.com/|Elsevier]].(=html=)</span>(=htmlend=) Also the 2004 edition, but only on pages that haven't been fully updated yet.

(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0521531888|''Evidence-based Psychopharmacology'']] Dan Stein, Bernard Lerer, Stephen Stahl © 2005 Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]](=html=)</span>(=htmlend=).

(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0781723213|''Antiepileptic Drugs'']] René H. Levy, Richard H. Mattson, Brian S. Meldrum, Emilio Perucca © 2003(=html=)</span>(=htmlend=)

(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0393705668|
''Instant Psychopharmacology'']] 2nd Edition Ronald J. Diamond MD © 2002. Published by W.W. Norton(=html=)</span>(=htmlend=)

(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0880488859|''Pharmacotherapy for Mood, Anxiety, and Cognitive Disorders'']] Stuart A. Montgomery, Halbreich Uriel © 2000 Published by [[http://www.appi.org|American Psychiatric Publishing]](=html=)</span>(=htmlend=)

(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)
[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/047175062X|''The Complete Guide to Psychiatric Drugs'']] Edward Drummond, MD © 2000. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.(=html=)</span>(=htmlend=)

(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://astore
.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/1563638002|''PDR: Physicians' Desk Reference 2010'']] 64th edition(=html=)</span>(=htmlend=) back through to 53rd edition of 1999.  Old copies of the ''PDR'' come in handy for PI sheets that are no longer available and difficult to find, as well as to track the changes in both indications and adverse effects.

(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/1606235427|''The Bipolar Disorder Survival Guide'']] David J. Miklowitz, Ph.D © 2002. Published by The Guilford Press.(=html=)</span>(=htmlend=)

(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0898626749|''Handbook of Affective Disorders'']] edited by Eugene S. Paykel, MD FRCPsych(=html=)</span>(=htmlend=)

(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0060897422|''Living Well with Depression and Bipolar Disorder: What Your Doctor Doesn't Tell You...That You Need to Know'']] John McManamy(=html=)</span>(=htmlend=)

(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/1416030743|''Clinical Neurology for Psychiatrists'']] David Myland Kaufman MD © 2001 W.B. Saunders Company.(=html=)</span>(=htmlend=)
An imprint of [[http://www.elsevierhealth.com/|Elsevier]]
to:
[[Cite:1429233435|''Primer of Drug Action'' 12th edition by Robert M. Julien Ph.D, Claire D. Advokat, Joseph Comaty © 2011]]  Published by [[http://www.worthpublishers.com/|Worth Publishers]].

[[Cite:0521173647|''The Prescriber's Guide
(Essential Psychopharmacology Series)'' Third edition by Stephen Stahl © 2009]] Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].

[[Cite:0889373957|''Clinical Handbook of Psychotropic Drugs'' 18th edition Adil S. Virani, K
. Bezchlibnyk-Butler, J. Jeffries © 2009 Published by Hogrefe & Huber Publishers]].

[[Cite:0521136725|''Essential Neuropharmacology: The Prescriber's Guide'' Stephen D. Silberstein, Michael J. Marmura © 2010]] Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].

[[Cite:0323040586|''Mosby's Drug Consult 2007''
(Generic Prescription Physician's Reference Book Series)]] © 2007 An imprint of [[http://www.elsevierhealth.com/|Elsevier]]. Also the 2004 edition, but only on pages that haven't been fully updated yet.

[[Cite:0521531888|''Evidence-based Psychopharmacology'' Dan Stein, Bernard Lerer, Stephen Stahl © 2005]] Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].

[[Cite:0781723213|''Antiepileptic Drugs'' René H. Levy, Richard H. Mattson, Brian S. Meldrum, Emilio Perucca © 2003]]

[[Cite:0393705668|''Instant Psychopharmacology'' 2nd Edition Ronald J. Diamond MD © 2002. Published by W.W. Norton]].

[[Cite:0880488859|''Pharmacotherapy for Mood, Anxiety, and Cognitive Disorders'' Stuart A. Montgomery, Halbreich Uriel © 2000]] Published by [[http://www.appi.org|American Psychiatric Publishing]].

[[Cite:047175062X|''The Complete Guide to Psychiatric Drugs'' Edward Drummond, MD © 2000. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.]]

[[Cite:1563638002|''PDR: Physicians
' Desk Reference 2010'' 64th edition]] back through to 53rd edition of 1999.  Old copies of the ''PDR'' come in handy for PI sheets that are no longer available and difficult to find, as well as to track the changes in both indications and adverse effects.

[[Cite:1606235427|''The Bipolar Disorder Survival Guide'' David J. Miklowitz, Ph.D © 2002. Published by The Guilford Press]].

[[Cite:0898626749|''Handbook of Affective Disorders'' edited by Eugene S
. Paykel, MD FRCPsych]]

[[Cite:0060897422|''Living Well with Depression and Bipolar Disorder: What Your Doctor Doesn't Tell You...That You Need to Know
'' John McManamy]]

[[Cite:1416030743|''Clinical Neurology
for Psychiatrists'' David Myland Kaufman MD © 2001 W.B. Saunders Company]]. An imprint of [[http://www.elsevierhealth.com/|Elsevier]]
2014-04-26 by JerodPoore -
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!!!Pictures Worth Millions of Words
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!!!!Pictures Worth Millions of Words
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!!!Blasts from the Past
An aspect of the HONcode Attribution guideline is:
>>bquote<<
All medical content (page or article) has to have a specific date of creation and a last modification date.

Date of last modification must also be included on every page describing ethical and legal information, author(s), mission, and the intended audience.
%qsource%-- [[http://www.hon.ch/HONcode/Guidelines/hc_p4.html|Principle 4 - Information must be documented: Referenced and dated]]
 
>><<
>>font-family:verdana font-size:4<<
Since I tend to go overboard on stuff, part of going with a wiki is because you can see the entire editing history of any page.  And if that isn't enough for you, check out [[https://web.archive.org/web/20030201000000*/http://www.crazymeds.org|The Wayback Machine's archive of crazymeds.org]] and [[https://web.archive.org/web/20070915000000*/https://crazymeds.net|crazymeds.net]].  I don't think their archive of crazymeds.org is correct, as I'm pretty sure I didn't have the format for pages on drugs until January 2004, December 2003 at the earliest.  My memory is getting really frelled, but I'm fairly certain that the most I'd done by the end of November 2003 was to cut the one huge file into a bunch of smaller ones for each drug or drug class.
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<meta property="twitter:description" content="{*$Description}">
<meta itemprop="datePublished" content="2011-01-31">
<meta itemprop="dateModified" content="{(ftime %F {*$LastModified})}">
<meta property="og:article:published_time" content="2011-01-31">
<meta property="og:article:modified_time" content="{(ftime %F {*$LastModified})}">
<meta itemprop="about" content="Crazymeds' knowledge base." />
2014-03-24 by JerodPoore -
2014-03-15 by JerodPoore -
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(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://pdsp.med.unc.edu/kidb.php|The PDSP K'_i_' database]](=html=)</span>(=htmlend=) All K'_i_' values, all the time.  These are the raw numbers used to determine the potency of certain aspects of medications, such as neurotransmitter reuptake inhibition.
to:
(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://pdsp.med.unc.edu/kidb.php|The PDSP K'_i_' database]](=html=)</span>(=htmlend=) All K'_i_' values, all the time.  These are the ''raw numbers'' used to determine the ''potency'' of certain aspects of the freebase form (E.g.: paroxetine, but what is actually in a pill of Paxil is paroxetine HCl; while Tegretol is full of freebase carbamazepine) such as neurotransmitter reuptake inhibition. Potency has nothing to do with efficacy.

(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://neuroscience.uth.tmc.edu/index.htm|Neuroscience Online, the Open-Access Neuroscience Electronic Textbook]](=html=)</span>(=htmlend=) From the University of Texas, one of the best places on the planet for the study of psychiatric and neurological conditions.  Making this combination text book and lecture series available for free is as awesome as its contents
.
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[[http://www.brainfacts.org/|Brain Facts]]

2014-03-13 by JerodPoore -
2014-03-12 by JerodPoore -
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On the right is a shot of some of the older material I used and most of the old medical texts I've collected.  Those really battered ones are versions of the PDR from the late 19'^th^' century, when everything was just ingredients and all pharmacies were compounding pharmacies.  You think your side effects are bad today?  Some of the bromides make leprosy look good.  Little wonder why many epileptics chose the accepted the alternative therapy of the day: bland foods, lukewarm baths, isolation from society, and celibacy[^##hmmm^] instead of the available meds.  Just like the ketogenic diet it supposedly worked better the younger one began.  Now how many monks and nuns had religious visions?  That's Ek Balam, Bes' sibling, on top of the bookcase.
to:
On the right is a shot of some of the older material I used and most of the old medical texts I've collected.  Those really battered ones are versions of the PDR from the late 19'^th^' century, when everything was just ingredients and all pharmacies were compounding pharmacies.  The two small books next to ''The United States Dispensatory'' 23'^rd^' edition (1943) are formularies from 1904 and 1922.  Not a list of meds 100-year-old insurance plans covered, but the actual recipes for treatments of different conditions.  What did they give people for mania in 1922?  One treatment is a mix of potassium bromide (one of the few working AEDs of its time, and one still used today to treat epilepsy in animals, and people in countries where phenobarbital is reserved for the rich) and a tincture of cannabis (which far too many of the bipolar self-medicate with).  I guess things haven't changed all that much.

You think your side effects are bad today?  Some of the bromides make leprosy look good.  Little wonder why many epileptics chose the accepted the alternative therapy of the day: bland foods, lukewarm baths, isolation from society, and celibacy[^##hmmm^] instead of the available meds.  Just like the ketogenic diet it supposedly worked better the younger one began.  Now how many monks and nuns had religious visions?  That's Ek Balam, Bes' sibling, on top of the bookcase.
2014-03-12 by JerodPoore -
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To give you an idea of what the Crazymeds library looks like:
||
||%lfloat
width=100px%[[https://crazymeds.net/BookCase1h.jpg | https://crazymeds.net/BookCase1a.jpg]]%% ||On the left is the primary Crazymeds library.  Note all the journals on the lower shelves.  Some of my articles will have references to papers with no linksNow you see why.  I don't link to the abstract as I, and other people without subscriptions to online services, will use abstracts alone as source material.  I try to avoid that, but sometimes everything I need is in the abstract.  So if I read it in a journal and it's not available online, I don't link to the abstract.  That's Bes on top of the bookcase.  [[https://plus.google.com/u/0/photos/105336332300485896643/albums/5801086370873229153|Here's a little more about Bes]]. || %rfloat width=100px%[[https://crazymeds.net/BookCase2h.jpg | http://crazymeds.us/BookCase2a.jpg]]%%||
||[-Click to Enlarge-]
||On the right is a shot of some of the old medical texts I collect.  Those really battered ones are versions of the PDR from the late 19'^th^' centuryYou think your side effects are bad today?  Some of the bromides make leprosy look good.  Little wonder why many epileptics chose the accepted the alternative therapy of the day: bland foods, lukewarm baths, isolation from society, and celibacy[^##hmmm^] instead of the available meds.  Just like the ketogenic diet it supposedly worked better the younger one began.  Now how many monks and nuns had religious visions?  That's Ek Balam, Bes' sibling, on top of the bookcase. || [-Click to Enlarge -] ||
to:

%Block lfloat width=100px%https://crazymeds.net/BookCase1a.jpg"Bes and the Crazymeds' library" [[<<]] [- [[http
://crazymeds.net/BookCase1h.jpg|Click to Enlarge]] -]
%rfloat
width=100px%https://crazymeds.net/BookCase2a.jpg"Ek Balam and the Crazymeds' library" [[<<]] [- [[http://crazymeds.us/BookCase2h.jpg|Click to Enlarge]] -]%%
To give you an idea of what the Crazymeds library looks like, on the left is the primary Crazymeds library
Note all the journals on the lower shelves.  Some of my articles will have references to papers with no links.  Now you see why.  I don't like to link to the abstract as I, and other people without subscriptions to online services, will use abstracts alone as source material.  I try to avoid that, but sometimes everything I need is in the abstract.  So if I read it in a journal and it's not available online, I don't link to the abstract.  That's Bes on top of the bookcase.  [[https://plus.google.com/u/0/photos/105336332300485896643/albums/5801086370873229153|Here's a little more about Bes]].

On the right is a shot of some of the older material I used and most
of the old medical texts I've collectedThose really battered ones are versions of the PDR from the late 19'^th^' century, when everything was just ingredients and all pharmacies were compounding pharmacies.  You think your side effects are bad today?  Some of the bromides make leprosy look good.  Little wonder why many epileptics chose the accepted the alternative therapy of the day: bland foods, lukewarm baths, isolation from society, and celibacy[^##hmmm^] instead of the available meds.  Just like the ketogenic diet it supposedly worked better the younger one began.  Now how many monks and nuns had religious visions?  That's Ek Balam, Bes' sibling, on top of the bookcase.
2014-03-04 by JerodPoore -
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%right%<|[[Sources/About#indexstart|About Crazymeds]]|> [[<<]]
to:
%right%<|[[Sources/About#indexstart|About Crazymeds]]|>
(:if expr ( eq {$@crazy_meds_skin} "triad" ) || ( eq {$@crazy_meds_skin} "mobile" ) || ( eq {$@crazy_meds_skin} "pmwiki" ) :)
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(:ifend:)

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!!!Amusing Anecdotes
Changed lines 22-23 from:
We also sit on our asses all day long and do a bunch of research. We find a study that is of interest and we put a link to it or an article about it within the page on the med in question. So there are many specific articles and studies that we've referenced throughout this site, either by direct link to the source or by quaint footnotes. However there are a few works that we've built upon as a foundation, and that we also reference to check on certain things. This isn't a static list. Paper is by far the superior medium, expensive though it may be.
to:
!!!Just the Facts
We also sit on our asses all day long and do a bunch of
research. We find a study that is of interest and we put a link to it or an article about it within the page on the med in question. So there are many specific articles and studies that we've referenced throughout this site, either by direct link to the source (when available online) or by quaint footnotes (when we read it in something not available online). However there are a few works that we've built upon as a foundation, and that we also reference to check on certain things. This isn't a static list. Paper is by far the superior medium, expensive though it may be.
Changed lines 25-26 from:
Here are the key books, papers, and sites that comprise the foundation of what we know about neuropsychopharmacology.  First up, the books:
to:
Here are the key books, papers, and sites that comprise the foundation of what we know about neuropsychopharmacology. 

!!!!Putting
the Mental in "Reading is Fundamental"
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!!!!Citable Sites
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!!!Pictures Worth Millions of Words
2014-02-26 by JerodPoore -
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||%lfloat width=100px%[[https://crazymeds.net/BookCase1a.jpg | https://crazymeds.net/BookCase1a.jpg]]%% ||On the left is the primary Crazymeds library.  Note all the journals on the lower shelves.  Some of my articles will have references to papers with no links.  Now you see why.  I don't link to the abstract as I, and other people without subscriptions to online services, will use abstracts alone as source material.  I try to avoid that, but sometimes everything I need is in the abstract.  So if I read it in a journal and it's not available online, I don't link to the abstract.  That's Bes on top of the bookcase.  [[https://plus.google.com/u/0/photos/105336332300485896643/albums/5801086370873229153|Here's a little more about Bes]]. || %rfloat width=100px%[[https://crazymeds.net/BookCase2a.jpg | https://crazymeds.net/BookCase2a.jpg]]%%||
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||%lfloat width=100px%[[https://crazymeds.net/BookCase1h.jpg | https://crazymeds.net/BookCase1a.jpg]]%% ||On the left is the primary Crazymeds library.  Note all the journals on the lower shelves.  Some of my articles will have references to papers with no links.  Now you see why.  I don't link to the abstract as I, and other people without subscriptions to online services, will use abstracts alone as source material.  I try to avoid that, but sometimes everything I need is in the abstract.  So if I read it in a journal and it's not available online, I don't link to the abstract.  That's Bes on top of the bookcase.  [[https://plus.google.com/u/0/photos/105336332300485896643/albums/5801086370873229153|Here's a little more about Bes]]. || %rfloat width=100px%[[https://crazymeds.net/BookCase2h.jpg | https://crazymeds.net/BookCase2a.jpg]]%%||
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%lfloat thumb% https://crazymeds.net/BookCase1a.jpg | [- Click to enlarge -]  %rfloat thumb% https://crazymeds.net/BookCase2a.jpg | [- Click to enlarge -]
On
the left is the primary Crazymeds library.  Note all the journals on the lower shelvesSome of my articles will have references to papers with no links.  Now you see why.  I don't link to the abstract as I, and other people without subscriptions to online services, will use abstracts alone as source material.  I try to avoid that, but sometimes everything I need is in the abstract.  So if I read it in a journal and it's not available online, I don't link to the abstract.  That's Bes on top of the bookcase.  [[https://plus.google.com/u/0/photos/105336332300485896643/albums/5801086370873229153|Here's a little more about Bes]].

On the right is a shot of some of the old medical texts I collect
.  Those really battered ones are versions of the PDR from the late 19'^th^' century.  You think your side effects are bad today?  Some of the bromides make leprosy look good.  Little wonder why many epileptics chose the accepted the alternative therapy of the day: bland foods, lukewarm baths, isolation from society, and celibacy[^##hmmm^] instead of the available meds.  Just like the ketogenic diet it supposedly worked better the younger one began.  Now how many monks and nuns had religious visions?  That's Ek Balam, Bes' sibling, on top of the bookcase.
to:
||
||
%lfloat width=100px%[[https://crazymeds.net/BookCase1a.jpg | https://crazymeds.net/BookCase1a.jpg]]%% ||On the left is the primary Crazymeds library.  Note all the journals on the lower shelves.  Some of my articles will have references to papers with no linksNow you see why.  I don't link to the abstract as I, and other people without subscriptions to online services, will use abstracts alone as source material.  I try to avoid that, but sometimes everything I need is in the abstract.  So if I read it in a journal and it's not available online, I don't link to the abstract.  That's Bes on top of the bookcase.  [[https://plus.google.com/u/0/photos/105336332300485896643/albums/5801086370873229153|Here's a little more about Bes]]. || %rfloat width=100px%[[https://crazymeds.net/BookCase2a.jpg | http://crazymeds.us/BookCase2a.jpg]]%%||
||[-Click to Enlarge-] ||On the right is a shot
of some of the old medical texts I collect.  Those really battered ones are versions of the PDR from the late 19'^th^' century.  You think your side effects are bad today?  Some of the bromides make leprosy look good.  Little wonder why many epileptics chose the accepted the alternative therapy of the day: bland foods, lukewarm baths, isolation from society, and celibacy[^##hmmm^] instead of the available meds.  Just like the ketogenic diet it supposedly worked better the younger one began.  Now how many monks and nuns had religious visions?  That's Ek Balam, Bes' sibling, on top of the bookcase. || [-Click to Enlarge -] ||
2014-02-26 by JerodPoore -
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A lot of our information comes from direct personal experience, along with that of our friends', and that of the many people who posted all the incarnations of [[https://crazymeds.net/CrazyTalk|the Crazymeds forum]] various online support groups, consumer review sites, and the like - what's known in the trade as anecdotal evidence.  I had thought that all sites about meds skewed negative, but [[http://www.jmir.org/2011/3/e53/|this study]] found that sites run by medical professionals were more neutral-to-positive about meds, so that makes me feel a lot better about the data I've gathered from them[^##fox^].  As I also gather data from sites that have nothing to do with medication and medical conditions, I'm pretty confident about both the size and spectrum of any online sampling I do.  Most of them are not random sites either, but are targeted based on demographic data I've collected since I noticed people with certain brain cooties tend to participate in similar activities or have similar interests, and that some sites about those activities/interests have an off-topic area dedicated to the specific mental health issue (depression, anxiety, etc.), or migraines, epilepsy, whatever.  Of course anyone with some other form of brain cooties would post something in that area, but you get the idea.  I'd give some examples, but since Big Pharma refuses to buy any ads because I am, in the words of one Big Pharma ad buyer, "too unpredictable," I'm not going to give them any leads to a shitload of potential customers for free.
[^##fox And I feel so...Fox News citing a study that uses Crazymeds as a data source, even if it does prove me wrong.^]
to:
A lot of our information comes from direct personal experience, along with that of our friends, and that of the many people who posted all the incarnations of [[https://crazymeds.net/CrazyTalk|Crazy Talk: the Crazymeds forum]] various online support groups, consumer review sites, and the like - what's known in the trade as anecdotal evidence.  I had thought that all sites about meds skewed negative, but [[http://www.jmir.org/2011/3/e53/|this study]] found that sites run by medical professionals were more neutral-to-positive about meds, so that makes me feel a lot better about the data I've gathered from them[^##fox^].  As I also gather data from sites that have nothing to do with medication and medical conditions, I'm pretty confident about both the size and spectrum of any online sampling I do.  Most of them are not random sites either, but are targeted based on demographic data I've collected since I noticed people with certain brain cooties tend to participate in similar activities or have similar interests, and that some sites about those activities/interests have an off-topic area dedicated to the specific mental health issue (depression, anxiety, etc.), or migraines, epilepsy, whatever.  Of course anyone with some other form of brain cooties would post something in that area, but you get the idea.  I'd give some examples, but since Big Pharma refuses to buy any ads because I am, in the words of one Big Pharma ad buyer, "too unpredictable," I'm not going to give them any leads to a shitload of potential customers for free.
[^##fox And I feel so...Fox News when a study that uses Crazymeds as a major source of its data proves me wrong.^]
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Here are the key books, papers, and sites that comprise the foundation of what we know about neuropsychopharmacology.

[[http
://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0521673763|''Stahl's Essential Psychopharmacology: Neuroscientific Basis and Practical Applications (Essential Psychopharmacology Series)'']] Third edition  by Stephen M. Stahl © 2008  Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].
to:
Here are the key books, papers, and sites that comprise the foundation of what we know about neuropsychopharmacology.  First up, the books:

(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http:
//astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0521673763|''Stahl's Essential Psychopharmacology: Neuroscientific Basis and Practical Applications (Essential Psychopharmacology Series)'']] Third edition  by Stephen M. Stahl © 2008  Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].(=html=)</span>(=htmlend=)
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[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/1429233435|''Primer of Drug Action'']] 12th edition by Robert M. Julien Ph.D, Claire D. Advokat, Joseph Comaty © 2011  Published by [[http://www.worthpublishers.com/|Worth Publishers]].

[[http:
//astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0521173647|''The Prescriber's Guide (Essential Psychopharmacology Series)'']] Third edition by Stephen Stahl © 2009 Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].

[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0889373957|''Clinical Handbook of Psychotropic Drugs'']] 18th edition Adil S. Virani, K. Bezchlibnyk-Butler, J. Jeffries © 2009 Published by Hogrefe & Huber Publishers.

[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg
-20/detail/0521136725|''Essential Neuropharmacology: The Prescriber's Guide'']] Stephen D. Silberstein, Michael J. Marmura © 2010 Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].

[[http:
//astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0323040586|''Mosby's Drug Consult 2007'' (Generic Prescription Physician's Reference Book Series)]] © 2007 An imprint of [[http://www.elsevierhealth.com/|Elsevier]]. Also the 2004 edition, but only on pages that haven't been fully updated yet.

[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0521531888|''Evidence-based Psychopharmacology'']] Dan Stein, Bernard Lerer, Stephen Stahl © 2005 Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].

[[http:
//astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0781723213|''Antiepileptic Drugs'']] René H. Levy, Richard H. Mattson, Brian S. Meldrum, Emilio Perucca © 2003

[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0393705668|''Instant Psychopharmacology'']] 2nd Edition Ronald J. Diamond MD © 2002. Published by W.W. Norton

[[http://astore
.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0880488859|''Pharmacotherapy for Mood, Anxiety, and Cognitive Disorders'']] Stuart A. Montgomery, Halbreich Uriel © 2000 Published by [[http://www.appi.org|American Psychiatric Publishing]]

[[http:
//astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/047175062X|''The Complete Guide to Psychiatric Drugs'']] Edward Drummond, MD © 2000. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

[[http:
//astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/1563638002|''PDR: Physicians' Desk Reference 2010'']] 64th edition back through to 53rd edition of 1999.  Old copies of the ''PDR'' come in handy for PI sheets that are no longer available and difficult to find, as well as to track the changes in both indications and adverse effects.

[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/1606235427|''The Bipolar Disorder Survival Guide'']] David J. Miklowitz, Ph.D © 2002. Published by The Guilford Press.

[[http:
//astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0898626749|''Handbook of Affective Disorders'']] edited by Eugene S. Paykel, MD FRCPsych

[[http://astore
.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0060897422|''Living Well with Depression and Bipolar Disorder: What Your Doctor Doesn't Tell You...That You Need to Know'']] John McManamy

[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/1416030743|''Clinical Neurology for Psychiatrists'']] David Myland Kaufman MD © 2001 W.B. Saunders Company. An imprint of [[http://www
.elsevierhealth.com/|Elsevier]]

''The New Chemotherapy in Mental Illness
'' edited by Hirsch L. Gordon MD, Ph.D, FAPA © 1958 Philosophical Library, Inc.  Published by Philosophical Library
to:
(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/1429233435|''Primer of Drug Action'']] 12th edition by Robert M. Julien Ph.D, Claire D. Advokat, Joseph Comaty © 2011  Published by [[http://www.worthpublishers.com/|Worth Publishers]].(=html=)</span>(=htmlend=)

(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)
[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0521173647|''The Prescriber's Guide (Essential Psychopharmacology Series)'']] Third edition by Stephen Stahl © 2009 Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].(=html=)</span>(=htmlend=)

(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://astore
.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0889373957|''Clinical Handbook of Psychotropic Drugs'']] 18th edition Adil S. Virani, K. Bezchlibnyk-Butler, J. Jeffries © 2009 Published by Hogrefe & Huber Publishers.(=html=)</span>(=htmlend=)

(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)
[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0521136725|''Essential Neuropharmacology: The Prescriber's Guide'']] Stephen D. Silberstein, Michael J. Marmura © 2010 Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].(=html=)</span>(=htmlend=)

(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://astore
.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0323040586|''Mosby's Drug Consult 2007'' (Generic Prescription Physician's Reference Book Series)]] © 2007 An imprint of [[http://www.elsevierhealth.com/|Elsevier]].(=html=)</span>(=htmlend=) Also the 2004 edition, but only on pages that haven't been fully updated yet.

(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0521531888|''Evidence-based Psychopharmacology'']] Dan Stein, Bernard Lerer, Stephen Stahl © 2005 Published by
[[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]](=html=)</span>(=htmlend=).

(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0781723213|''Antiepileptic
Drugs'']] René H. Levy, Richard H. Mattson, Brian S. Meldrum, Emilio Perucca © 2003(=html=)</span>(=htmlend=)

(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0393705668|
''Instant Psychopharmacology'']] 2nd Edition Ronald J. Diamond MD © 2002. Published by W.W. Norton(=html=)</span>(=htmlend=)

(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0880488859|
''Pharmacotherapy for Mood, Anxiety, and Cognitive Disorders'']] Stuart A. Montgomery, Halbreich Uriel © 2000 Published by [[http://www.appi.org|American Psychiatric Publishing]](=html=)</span>(=htmlend=)

(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)
[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/047175062X|''The Complete Guide to Psychiatric Drugs'']] Edward Drummond, MD © 2000. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.(=html=)</span>(=htmlend=)

(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/1563638002|
''PDR: Physicians' Desk Reference 2010'']] 64th edition(=html=)</span>(=htmlend=) back through to 53rd edition of 1999.  Old copies of the ''PDR'' come in handy for PI sheets that are no longer available and difficult to find, as well as to track the changes in both indications and adverse effects.

(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/1606235427|''The Bipolar Disorder Survival Guide
'']] David J. Miklowitz, Ph.D © 2002. Published by The Guilford Press.(=html=)</span>(=htmlend=)

(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0898626749|''Handbook of Affective Disorders'']] edited by Eugene S. Paykel, MD FRCPsych(=html=)</span>(=htmlend=)

(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0060897422|''Living Well with Depression and Bipolar Disorder: What Your Doctor Doesn't Tell You...That You Need to Know'']] John McManamy(=html=)</span>(=htmlend=)

(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/1416030743|''Clinical Neurology for Psychiatrists'']] David Myland Kaufman MD © 2001 W.B. Saunders Company.(=html=)</span>(=htmlend=) An imprint of [[http://www.elsevierhealth.com/|Elsevier]]

(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)''The New Chemotherapy in Mental Illness'' edited by Hirsch L. Gordon MD, Ph.D, FAPA © 1958 Philosophical
Library, Inc.  Published by Philosophical Library(=html=)</span>(=htmlend=)
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If you're more of a cheapskate than I am, here are some awesome online resources.

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[[http://pdsp.med.unc.edu/kidb.php|The PDSP K'_i_' database]] All K'_i_' values, all the time.  These are the raw numbers used to determine the potency of certain aspects of medications, such as neurotransmitter reuptake inhibition.
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(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://pdsp.med.unc.edu/kidb.php|The PDSP K'_i_' database]](=html=)</span>(=htmlend=) All K'_i_' values, all the time.  These are the raw numbers used to determine the potency of certain aspects of medications, such as neurotransmitter reuptake inhibition.
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[[http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/444804|Genetic Basis of Drug Metabolism]]

[[http:
//www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0004-282X2003000400008&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en|Is low antiepileptic drug dose effective in long-term seizure-free patients?]] Tânia A.M.O. Cardoso; Fernando Cendes; Carlos A.M. Guerreiro  ''Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria'' vol.61 no.3A  Sept. 2003

[[https://www.dovepress.com/getfile.php?fileID=11237|Monoamine depletion by reuptake inhibitors]] Marty Hinz; Alvin Stein; Thomas Uncini ''Drug, Healthcare and Patient Safety'', October 2011 - Dove Press
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(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/444804|Genetic Basis of Drug Metabolism]](=html=)</span>(=htmlend=)

(
=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0004-282X2003000400008&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en|Is low antiepileptic drug dose effective in long-term seizure-free patients?]](=html=)</span>(=htmlend=) Tânia A.M.O. Cardoso; Fernando Cendes; Carlos A.M. Guerreiro  ''Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria'' vol.61 no.3A  Sept. 2003

(=html=)<span itemprop="citation">(=htmlend=)[[https://www.dovepress.com/getfile.php?fileID=11237|Monoamine depletion by reuptake inhibitors]](=html=)</span>(=htmlend=) Marty Hinz; Alvin Stein; Thomas Uncini ''Drug, Healthcare and Patient Safety'', October 2011 - Dove Press

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And to give you an idea of what the Crazymeds library looks like:

%width=800 height=600% https://crazymeds.net/NewShelf.jpg | The Crazymeds Library's "top tier" books.

%width=600 height=250% https://crazymeds.net/ShelfTwo.JPG | An older, clearer shot of the "second tier" books.

And a shot of some of the old medical texts I collect.  That really battered one is a version of the PDR from the late 19'^th^' century.  You think your side effects are bad today?  Little wonder why many epileptics chose the accepted the alternative therapy of the day: bland foods, lukewarm baths, isolation from society, and celibacy[^##hmmm^] instead of the available meds.  Just like the ketogenic diet it supposedly worked better the younger one began.  Now how many monks and nuns had religious visions?

https://crazymeds.net/ShelfOld.JPG

[^##hmmm Wait a minute, I'm on a highly restrictive diet, I live on the fringes of civilization and I'll not interact with another person
- even over teh interwebs - for weeks at a time, I'll soak in the tub for a couple of hours, and I haven't been laid in... what year is this?  W. was still President and the economy hadn't tanked the last time I had any fun, and I haven't been in anything close to a relationship with regular congress since 2004.  I can tell you, it doesn't work all that well.  If my Topamax levels get hosed by a funky generic I'll have an aura or wake up with a seizure hangover.^]

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To give you an idea of what the Crazymeds library looks like:

%lfloat thumb% https://crazymeds.net/BookCase1a.jpg | [- Click to enlarge -]  %rfloat thumb% https://crazymeds.net/BookCase2a.jpg | [- Click to enlarge -]
On the left is the primary Crazymeds library.  Note all the journals on the lower shelves.  Some of my articles will have references to papers with no links.  Now you see why.  I don't link to the abstract as I, and other people without subscriptions to online services, will use abstracts alone as source material.  I try to avoid that, but sometimes everything I need is in the abstract.  So if I read it in a journal and it's not available online, I don't link to the abstract.  That's Bes on top of the bookcase.  [[https://plus.google.com/u/0/photos/105336332300485896643/albums/5801086370873229153|Here's a little more about Bes]].

On the right is a shot of some of the old medical texts I collect.  Those really battered ones are versions of the PDR from the late 19'^th^' century.  You think your side effects are bad today?  Some of the bromides make leprosy look good.  Little wonder why many epileptics chose the accepted the alternative therapy of the day: bland foods, lukewarm baths, isolation from society, and celibacy[^##hmmm^] instead of the available meds.  Just like the ketogenic diet it supposedly worked better the younger one began.  Now how many monks and nuns had religious visions?  That's Ek Balam, Bes' sibling, on top of the bookcase.

[^##hmmm Wait a minute, I'm on a highly restrictive diet, I live on the fringes of civilization, I'll not interact with another person - even over teh interwebs - for weeks at a time, I'll soak in the tub for a couple of hours, and I haven't been laid in... what year is this?  W. was still President and the economy hadn't tanked the last time I had any fun, and I haven't been in anything close to a relationship with regular congress since 2004.  It's not perfect - if my Topamax levels get hosed by a funky generic sometimes I'll have an aura first thing in the morning or wake up with a seizure hangover - but both my seizure control and bipolar symptoms have been a lot better. Jackson knew his shit. ^]

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[^#^]

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Page created by: Jerod Poore.  Date created: 31 January 2011  Last edited by: {$LastModifiedBy} on {*$LastModified}
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''{$Title}'' by (=html=)<span itemprop="copyrightHolder">(=htmlend=)[[{Profiles/JerodPoore}|Jerod Poore]](=html=)</span>(=htmlend=) is copyright © (=html=)<span itemprop="copyrightYear">2011</span>(=htmlend=) Jerod Poore[[<<]]
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{(ftime fmt="%A, %d %B, %Y at %H:%M:%S" when=@{*$LastModifiedTime})} by {*$LastModifiedBy} ||Page Author: [[{Profiles/JerodPoore}|Jerod Poore]] ||Date created: 31 January 2011 ||

All drug names are the trademarks of someone else.  Look on the appropriate PI sheets or ask [[http://www.google.com|Google]] who the owners are.  The way pharmaceutical companies buy each other and swap products like Monopoly™ real estate, the ownership of any trademarks may have changed without my noticing.

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Page design and explanatory material by Jerod Poore, copyright © 2004 - 2013.  All rights reserved.  Don't automatically believe everything you read on teh Intergoogles. [[<<]]
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Page design and explanatory material by Jerod Poore, copyright © 2004 - 2014.  All rights reserved.  Don't automatically believe everything you read on teh Intergoogles. [[<<]]
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2014-02-25 by JerodPoore -
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%right%<|[[Sources/About#indexstart|About Crazymeds]]|> [[<<]]
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A lot of our information comes from direct personal experience, along with that of our friends', and that of the many people who posted all the incarnations of [[https://crazymeds.net/CrazyTalk|the Crazy Meds forum]] various online support groups, consumer review sites, and the like - what's known in the trade as anecdotal evidence.  I had thought that all sites about meds skewed negative, but [[http://www.jmir.org/2011/3/e53/|this study]] found that sites run by medical professionals were more neutral-to-positive about meds, so that makes me feel a lot better about the data I've gathered from them[^##fox^].  As I also gather data from sites that have nothing to do with medication and medical conditions, I'm pretty confident about both the size and spectrum of any online sampling I do.  Most of them are not random sites either, but are targeted based on demographic data I've collected since I noticed people with certain brain cooties tend to participate in similar activities or have similar interests, and that some sites about those activities/interests have an off-topic area dedicated to the specific mental health issue (depression, anxiety, etc.), or migraines, epilepsy, whatever.  Of course anyone with some other form of brain cooties would post something in that area, but you get the idea.  I'd give some examples, but since Big Pharma refuses to buy any ads because I am, in the words of one Big Pharma ad buyer, "too unpredictable," I'm not going to give them any leads to a shitload of potential customers for free.
[^##fox And I feel so...Fox News citing a study that uses Crazy Meds as a data source, even if it does prove me wrong.^]
to:
A lot of our information comes from direct personal experience, along with that of our friends', and that of the many people who posted all the incarnations of [[https://crazymeds.net/CrazyTalk|the Crazymeds forum]] various online support groups, consumer review sites, and the like - what's known in the trade as anecdotal evidence.  I had thought that all sites about meds skewed negative, but [[http://www.jmir.org/2011/3/e53/|this study]] found that sites run by medical professionals were more neutral-to-positive about meds, so that makes me feel a lot better about the data I've gathered from them[^##fox^].  As I also gather data from sites that have nothing to do with medication and medical conditions, I'm pretty confident about both the size and spectrum of any online sampling I do.  Most of them are not random sites either, but are targeted based on demographic data I've collected since I noticed people with certain brain cooties tend to participate in similar activities or have similar interests, and that some sites about those activities/interests have an off-topic area dedicated to the specific mental health issue (depression, anxiety, etc.), or migraines, epilepsy, whatever.  Of course anyone with some other form of brain cooties would post something in that area, but you get the idea.  I'd give some examples, but since Big Pharma refuses to buy any ads because I am, in the words of one Big Pharma ad buyer, "too unpredictable," I'm not going to give them any leads to a shitload of potential customers for free.
[^##fox And I feel so...Fox News citing a study that uses Crazymeds as a data source, even if it does prove me wrong.^]
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And to give you an idea of what the Crazy Meds library looks like:

%width=800 height=600% https://crazymeds.net/NewShelf.jpg | The Crazy Meds Library's "top tier" books.
to:
And to give you an idea of what the Crazymeds library looks like:

%width=800 height=600% https://crazymeds.net/NewShelf.jpg | The Crazymeds Library's "top tier" books.
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2013-07-04 by Jerod Poore -
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[[Sources.Copyright|Full copyright notice]].  [[Sources.Disclaimer|Our big-ass disclaimer]].
to:
[[Sources/Copyright|Full copyright notice]].  [[Sources/Disclaimer|Our big-ass disclaimer]].
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2013-07-04 by Jerod Poore -
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Page design and explanatory material by Jerod Poore, copyright © 2004 - 2012.  All rights reserved.  Don't automatically believe everything you read on teh Intergoogles. [[<<]]
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Page design and explanatory material by Jerod Poore, copyright © 2004 - 2013.  All rights reserved.  Don't automatically believe everything you read on teh Intergoogles. [[<<]]
2013-04-02 by Jerod Poore -
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[[http://www.globalrph.com/|Global RPh]] - I don't know if they have everything you need to pass the MCATs and get you through medical school, but it sure seems that way.
2012-10-10 by Jerod Poore -
Changed line 14 from:
A lot of our information comes from direct personal experience, along with that of our friends', and that of the many people who posted all the incarnations of [[https://crazymeds.net/CrazyTalk|the Crazy Meds forum]] various online support groups, consumer review sites, and the like - what's known in the trade as anecdotal evidence.  I had thought that all sites about meds skewed negative, but [[http://www.jmir.org/2011/3/e53/|this study]] found that sites run by medical professionals were more neutral-to-positive about meds, so that makes me feel a lot better about the data I've gathered from them[^##fox^].  As I also gather data from sites that have nothing to do with medication and medical conditions, I'm pretty confident about both the size and spectrum of any online sampling I do.
to:
A lot of our information comes from direct personal experience, along with that of our friends', and that of the many people who posted all the incarnations of [[https://crazymeds.net/CrazyTalk|the Crazy Meds forum]] various online support groups, consumer review sites, and the like - what's known in the trade as anecdotal evidence.  I had thought that all sites about meds skewed negative, but [[http://www.jmir.org/2011/3/e53/|this study]] found that sites run by medical professionals were more neutral-to-positive about meds, so that makes me feel a lot better about the data I've gathered from them[^##fox^].  As I also gather data from sites that have nothing to do with medication and medical conditions, I'm pretty confident about both the size and spectrum of any online sampling I do.  Most of them are not random sites either, but are targeted based on demographic data I've collected since I noticed people with certain brain cooties tend to participate in similar activities or have similar interests, and that some sites about those activities/interests have an off-topic area dedicated to the specific mental health issue (depression, anxiety, etc.), or migraines, epilepsy, whatever.  Of course anyone with some other form of brain cooties would post something in that area, but you get the idea.  I'd give some examples, but since Big Pharma refuses to buy any ads because I am, in the words of one Big Pharma ad buyer, "too unpredictable," I'm not going to give them any leads to a shitload of potential customers for free.
2012-10-10 by Jerod Poore -
2012-10-10 by Jerod Poore -
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over 300 scientific and professional articles, and many of them are available at
this site, which is full of useful psychopharmacological data involving drug-drug interactions, methods of actions, clinical efficacies, pharmacokinetics and more.  Dr. Preskorn has received continuous grant
funding since 1978 for studies in the areas of psychopharmacology, neuroscience, and psychiatric
illnesses.

to:
over 300 scientific and professional articles, and many of them are available at this site, which is full of useful psychopharmacological data involving drug-drug interactions, methods of actions, clinical efficacies, pharmacokinetics and more written in a fairly accessible way.  Dr. Preskorn has received continuous grant funding since 1978 for studies in the areas of psychopharmacology, neuroscience, and psychiatric illnesses.  While most of the articles are at least ten years old, Dr. Preskorn is still publishing papers, so we might be seeing new material eventually.  Regardless, he covers the basics of psychopharmacology in a way that makes sense, and the basics haven't changed much.
Changed lines 70-71 from:
[[http://www.plosmedicine.org/home.action|PLoS Medicine]] The Public Library of Science is another great repository of free, peer-reviewed articles.
to:
[[http://www.plosmedicine.org/home.action|PLoS Medicine]]The Public Library of Science is another great repository of free, peer-reviewed articles.

[[http://scholar.google.com/|Google Scholar]].  For anything that may have slipped through the cracks of PubMed and PLoS.  As with PubMed (but not PubMed Central or PLoS), not everything listed as a free full-text article is.  Unlike PubMed, sometimes there are free full-text versions when it looks as if there isn't.  Whenever you see an option for "All # Versions", click it, as there may be a link to a full-text version that didn't make the main page for some reason.  And if that link to a full-text version was a bait'n'switch job, maybe one of the other versions has the full text for free for real
.
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[^#^]

>><<
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Page created by: Jerod Poore.  Date created
: 31 January 2011  Last edited by: {$LastModifiedBy}
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Page created by
: Jerod Poore.  Date created: 31 January 2011  Last edited by: {$LastModifiedBy} on {*$LastModified}
2012-06-13 by JerodPoore -
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[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/1606235427|''The Bipolar Disorder Survival Guide'']] David J. Miklowitz, Ph.D
to:
[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/1606235427|''The Bipolar Disorder Survival Guide'']] David J. Miklowitz, Ph.D © 2002. Published by The Guilford Press.
2012-06-12 by JerodPoore -
Changed line 20 from:
[[hthttp://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0521173647|''The Prescriber's Guide (Essential Psychopharmacology Series)'']] Third edition by Stephen Stahl © 2009 Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].
to:
[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0521173647|''The Prescriber's Guide (Essential Psychopharmacology Series)'']] Third edition by Stephen Stahl © 2009 Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].
2012-06-12 by JerodPoore -
Changed lines 22-23 from:
[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0889373957|''Clinical Handbook of Psychotropic Drugs'']]  18th edition Adil S. Virani, K. Bezchlibnyk-Butler, J. Jeffries © 2009 Published by Hogrefe & Huber Publishers.
to:
[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0889373957|''Clinical Handbook of Psychotropic Drugs'']] 18th edition Adil S. Virani, K. Bezchlibnyk-Butler, J. Jeffries © 2009 Published by Hogrefe & Huber Publishers.

[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0521136725|''Essential Neuropharmacology: The Prescriber's Guide'']] Stephen D. Silberstein, Michael J. Marmura © 2010 Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]]
.
Added lines 33-34:

[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0880488859|''Pharmacotherapy for Mood, Anxiety, and Cognitive Disorders'']] Stuart A. Montgomery, Halbreich Uriel © 2000 Published by [[http://www.appi.org|American Psychiatric Publishing]]
2012-06-01 by JerodPoore -
Added lines 67-68:

[[http://ktclearinghouse.ca/cebm|Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine]]
2012-05-18 by JerodPoore -
Changed lines 9-12 from:
A lot of our information comes from direct personal experience, along with that of our friends', and that of the many people who posted all the incarnations of [[https://crazymeds.net/CrazyTalk|the Crazy Meds forum]], and to various online support groups - what's known in the trade as anecdotal evidence. We also sit on our asses all day long and do a bunch of research. We find a study that is of interest and we put a link to it or an article about it within the page on the med in question. So there are many specific articles and studies that we've referenced throughout this site, either by direct link to the source or by quaint footnotes. However there are a few works that we've built upon as a foundation, and that we also reference to check on certain things. This isn't a static list. Paper is by far the superior medium, expensive though it may be.
to:
A lot of our information comes from direct personal experience, along with that of our friends', and that of the many people who posted all the incarnations of [[https://crazymeds.net/CrazyTalk|the Crazy Meds forum]] various online support groups, consumer review sites, and the like - what's known in the trade as anecdotal evidence.  I had thought that all sites about meds skewed negative, but [[http://www.jmir.org/2011/3/e53/|this study]] found that sites run by medical professionals were more neutral-to-positive about meds, so that makes me feel a lot better about the data I've gathered from them[^##fox^].  As I also gather data from sites that have nothing to do with medication and medical conditions, I'm pretty confident about both the size and spectrum of any online sampling I do.
[^##fox And I feel so...Fox News citing a study that uses Crazy Meds as a data source, even if it does prove me wrong.^]

We also sit on our asses all day long and do a bunch of research. We find a study that is of interest and we put a link to it or an article about it within the page on the med in question. So there are many specific articles and studies that we've referenced throughout this site, either by direct link to the source or by quaint footnotes. However there are a few works that we've built upon as a foundation, and that we also reference to check on certain things. This isn't a static list. Paper is by far the superior medium, expensive though it may be.
Changed lines 20-23 from:
[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0521743990|''The Prescriber's Guide (Essential Psychopharmacology Series)'']] Third edition by Stephen Stahl © 2009 Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].

[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0889373698|''Clinical Handbook of Psychotropic Drugs'']]  18th edition Adil S. Virani, K. Bezchlibnyk-Butler, J. Jeffries © 2009 Published by Hogrefe & Huber Publishers.
to:
[[hthttp://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0521173647|''The Prescriber's Guide (Essential Psychopharmacology Series)'']] Third edition by Stephen Stahl © 2009 Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].

[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0889373957|''Clinical Handbook of Psychotropic Drugs'']]  18th edition Adil S. Virani, K. Bezchlibnyk-Butler, J. Jeffries © 2009 Published by Hogrefe & Huber Publishers.
Changed lines 28-29 from:
[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0393703916|''Instant Psychopharmacology'']] 2nd Edition Ronald J. Diamond MD © 2002. Published by W.W. Norton
to:
[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0781723213|''Antiepileptic Drugs'']] René H. Levy, Richard H. Mattson, Brian S. Meldrum, Emilio Perucca © 2003

[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0393705668
|''Instant Psychopharmacology'']] 2nd Edition Ronald J. Diamond MD © 2002. Published by W.W. Norton
Changed lines 34-35 from:
[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/1563637480|''PDR: Physicians' Desk Reference 2010'']] 64th edition back through to 53rd edition of 1999.  Old copies of the ''PDR'' come in handy for PI sheets that are no longer available and difficult to find, as well as to track the changes in both indications and adverse effects.
to:
[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/1563638002|''PDR: Physicians' Desk Reference 2010'']] 64th edition back through to 53rd edition of 1999.  Old copies of the ''PDR'' come in handy for PI sheets that are no longer available and difficult to find, as well as to track the changes in both indications and adverse effects.
Changed lines 42-43 from:
[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0721689957|''Clinical Neurology for Psychiatrists'']] David Myland Kaufman MD © 2001 W.B. Saunders Company. An imprint of [[http://www.elsevierhealth.com/|Elsevier]]
to:
[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/1416030743|''Clinical Neurology for Psychiatrists'']] David Myland Kaufman MD © 2001 W.B. Saunders Company. An imprint of [[http://www.elsevierhealth.com/|Elsevier]]
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Page created by: Jerod Poore.  Date created: 31 January 2011  Last edited by: {$Author}
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Page design and explanatory material by Jerod Poore, copyright © 2004 - 2012.  All rights reserved.  Don't automatically believe everything you read on teh Intergoogles. [[<<]]
[[Sources.Copyright|Full copyright notice]].  [[Sources.Disclaimer|Our big-ass disclaimer]].
(:else:)
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Page design and explanatory material copyright © 2004 - 2012 Jerod Poore. All rights reserved.  Don't automatically believe everything you read on teh Intergoogles. [[<<]]
[[Sources.Copyright|Full copyright notice]].  [[Sources.Disclaimer|Our big-ass disclaimer]].
2012-03-23 by JerodPoore -
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(:Description Books, papers, and sites that provide us with our background knowledge.:)
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(:Description Updated {*$LastModified}. Books, papers, and sites that provide us with our background knowledge.:)
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Page design and explanatory material copyright © 2004 - 2012 Jerod Poore. All rights reserved.  Don't automatically believe everything you read on teh Intergoogles. [[<<]]
[[Sources.Copyright|Full copyright notice]].  [[Sources.Disclaimer|Our big-ass disclaimer]].
(:ifend:)
2011-11-06 by JerodPoore -
Changed line 65 from:
[[https://www.dovepress.com/getfile.php?fileID=11237|Monoamine depletion by reuptake inhibitors]] Marty Hinz; Alvin Stein; Thomas Uncini Drug, Healthcare and Patient Safety, 2011 - Dove Press
to:
[[https://www.dovepress.com/getfile.php?fileID=11237|Monoamine depletion by reuptake inhibitors]] Marty Hinz; Alvin Stein; Thomas Uncini ''Drug, Healthcare and Patient Safety'', October 2011 - Dove Press
2011-11-06 by JerodPoore -
Added lines 64-66:

[[https://www.dovepress.com/getfile.php?fileID=11237|Monoamine depletion by reuptake inhibitors]] Marty Hinz; Alvin Stein; Thomas Uncini Drug, Healthcare and Patient Safety, 2011 - Dove Press

2011-11-05 by JerodPoore -
2011-11-02 by JerodPoore -
Added lines 62-63:

[[http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0004-282X2003000400008&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en|Is low antiepileptic drug dose effective in long-term seizure-free patients?]] Tânia A.M.O. Cardoso; Fernando Cendes; Carlos A.M. Guerreiro  ''Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria'' vol.61 no.3A  Sept. 2003
2011-10-14 by JerodPoore -
Added lines 22-23:

[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0521531888|''Evidence-based Psychopharmacology'']] Dan Stein, Bernard Lerer, Stephen Stahl © 2005 Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].
2011-10-05 by JerodPoore -
Changed lines 15-16 from:
[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/1429233435|''Primer of Drug Action'']] 12th edition by Robert M. Julien Ph.D., Claire D. Advokat, Joseph Comaty © 2011  Published by [[http://www.worthpublishers.com/|Worth Publishers]].
to:
[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/1429233435|''Primer of Drug Action'']] 12th edition by Robert M. Julien Ph.D, Claire D. Advokat, Joseph Comaty © 2011  Published by [[http://www.worthpublishers.com/|Worth Publishers]].
Changed lines 23-26 from:
[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0393703916|''Instant Psychopharmacology'']] 2nd Edition Ronald J. Diamond M.D. © 2002. Published by W.W. Norton

[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/047175062X|''The Complete Guide to Psychiatric Drugs'']] Edward Drummond, M.D. © 2000. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
to:
[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0393703916|''Instant Psychopharmacology'']] 2nd Edition Ronald J. Diamond MD © 2002. Published by W.W. Norton

[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/047175062X|''The Complete Guide to Psychiatric Drugs'']] Edward Drummond, MD © 2000. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Changed lines 29-32 from:
[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/1606235427|''The Bipolar Disorder Survival Guide'']] David J. Miklowitz, Ph.D.

[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0898626749|''Handbook of Affective Disorders'']] edited by Eugene S. Paykel, M.D. FRCPsych
to:
[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/1606235427|''The Bipolar Disorder Survival Guide'']] David J. Miklowitz, Ph.D

[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0898626749|''Handbook of Affective Disorders'']] edited by Eugene S. Paykel, MD FRCPsych
Changed lines 35-37 from:
''The New Chemotherapy in Mental Illness'' edited by Hirsch L. Gordon M.D., Ph.D., F.A.P.A. © 1958 Philosophical Library, Inc.  Published by Philosophical Library
to:
[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0721689957|''Clinical Neurology for Psychiatrists'']] David Myland Kaufman MD © 2001 W.B. Saunders Company. An imprint of [[http://www.elsevierhealth.com/|Elsevier]]

''The New Chemotherapy in Mental Illness'' edited by Hirsch L. Gordon MD, Ph.D, FAPA
© 1958 Philosophical Library, Inc.  Published by Philosophical Library
2011-07-29 by JerodPoore -
2011-07-29 by JerodPoore -
Changed line 13 from:
[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0521673763|''Stahl's Essential Psychopharmacology: Neuroscientific Basis and Practical Applications (Essential Psychopharmacology Series)'']] Third edition  by Stephen M. Stahl
to:
[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0521673763|''Stahl's Essential Psychopharmacology: Neuroscientific Basis and Practical Applications (Essential Psychopharmacology Series)'']] Third edition  by Stephen M. Stahl © 2008  Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].
Changed lines 15-21 from:
[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/1429233435|''Primer of Drug Action'']] 12th edition by Robert M. Julien Ph.D., Claire D. Advokat, Joseph Comaty

[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0521743990|''The Prescriber's Guide (Essential Psychopharmacology Series)'']] Third edition by Stephen Stahl

[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0889373698|''Clinical Handbook of Psychotropic Drugs'']]  18th edition Adil S. Virani, K. Bezchlibnyk-Butler, J. Jeffries

[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0323040586|''Mosby's Drug Consult 2007'' (Generic Prescription Physician's Reference Book Series)]]  Also the 2004 edition, but only on pages that haven't been fully updated yet.
to:
[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/1429233435|''Primer of Drug Action'']] 12th edition by Robert M. Julien Ph.D., Claire D. Advokat, Joseph Comaty © 2011  Published by [[http://www.worthpublishers.com/|Worth Publishers]].

[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0521743990|''The Prescriber's Guide (Essential Psychopharmacology Series)'']] Third edition by Stephen Stahl © 2009 Published by [[http://www.cambridge.org|Cambridge University Press]].

[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0889373698|''Clinical Handbook of Psychotropic Drugs'']]  18th edition Adil S. Virani, K. Bezchlibnyk-Butler, J. Jeffries © 2009 Published by Hogrefe & Huber Publishers.

[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0323040586|''Mosby's Drug Consult 2007'' (Generic Prescription Physician's Reference Book Series)]] © 2007 An imprint of [[http://www.elsevierhealth.com/|Elsevier]].
Also the 2004 edition, but only on pages that haven't been fully updated yet.
2011-05-24 by JerodPoore -
Added lines 6-7:

Per HON Code principles [[http://www.hon.ch/HONcode/Guidelines/hc_p4.html|4 - Attribution]] - and [[http://www.hon.ch/HONcode/Guidelines/hc_p5.html|5 - Justifiability]], this is why we think we know everything.
2011-05-24 by JerodPoore -
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%lframe width=800 height=600% https://crazymeds.net/NewShelf.jpg | The Crazy Meds Library's "top tier" books.

%lframe width=600 height=250% https://crazymeds.net/ShelfTwo.JPG | An older, clearer shot of the "second tier" books.
to:
%width=800 height=600% https://crazymeds.net/NewShelf.jpg | The Crazy Meds Library's "top tier" books.

%width=600 height=250% https://crazymeds.net/ShelfTwo.JPG | An older, clearer shot of the "second tier" books.
2011-05-24 by JerodPoore -
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%lframe thumb% https://crazymeds.net/NewShelf.jpg | The Crazy Meds Library's "top tier" books.

Here's an older, clearer shot of the "second tier" books.

https://crazymeds.net/ShelfTwo.JPG
to:
%lframe width=800 height=600% https://crazymeds.net/NewShelf.jpg | The Crazy Meds Library's "top tier" books.

%lframe width=600 height=250% https://crazymeds.net/ShelfTwo.JPG | An older, clearer shot of the "second tier" books.
2011-05-24 by JerodPoore -
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%lframe width=400 height=300% https://crazymeds.net/NewShelf.jpg | The Crazy Meds Library's "top tier" books.
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%lframe thumb% https://crazymeds.net/NewShelf.jpg | The Crazy Meds Library's "top tier" books.
2011-05-24 by JerodPoore -
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https://crazymeds.net/NewShelf.jpg
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%lframe width=400 height=300% https://crazymeds.net/NewShelf.jpg | The Crazy Meds Library's "top tier" books.
2011-05-24 by JerodPoore -
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Here are the books, papers, and sites that comprise the foundation of what we know about neuropsychopharmacology.
to:
%right%<|[[Sources.About#indexstart#indexend|About Crazy Meds]]|> [[<<]]

A lot of our information comes from direct personal experience, along with that of our friends', and that of the many people who posted all the incarnations of [[https://crazymeds.net/CrazyTalk|the Crazy Meds forum]], and to various online support groups - what's known in the trade as anecdotal evidence. We also sit on our asses all day long and do a bunch of research. We find a study that is of interest and we put a link to it or an article about it within the page on the med in question. So there are many specific articles and studies that we've referenced throughout this site, either by direct link to the source or by quaint footnotes. However there are a few works that we've built upon as a foundation, and that we also reference to check on certain things. This isn't a static list. Paper is by far the superior medium, expensive though it may be.
 
Here are the key
books, papers, and sites that comprise the foundation of what we know about neuropsychopharmacology.
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And to give you an idea of what the Crazy Meds library looks like:

https://crazymeds.net/NewShelf.jpg

Here's an older, clearer shot of the "second tier" books.

https://crazymeds.net/ShelfTwo.JPG

And a shot of some of the old medical texts I collect.  That really battered one is a version of the PDR from the late 19'^th^' century.  You think your side effects are bad today?  Little wonder why many epileptics chose the accepted the alternative therapy of the day: bland foods, lukewarm baths, isolation from society, and celibacy[^##hmmm^] instead of the available meds.  Just like the ketogenic diet it supposedly worked better the younger one began.  Now how many monks and nuns had religious visions?

https://crazymeds.net/ShelfOld.JPG

[^##hmmm Wait a minute, I'm on a highly restrictive diet, I live on the fringes of civilization and I'll not interact with another person - even over teh interwebs - for weeks at a time, I'll soak in the tub for a couple of hours, and I haven't been laid in... what year is this?  W. was still President and the economy hadn't tanked the last time I had any fun, and I haven't been in anything close to a relationship with regular congress since 2004.  I can tell you, it doesn't work all that well.  If my Topamax levels get hosed by a funky generic I'll have an aura or wake up with a seizure hangover.^]
2011-04-24 by JerodPoore -
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[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/1563637480|''PDR: Physicians' Desk Reference 2010'']] 64th edition  back through to 53rd edition of 1999.  Old copies of the ''PDR'' come in handy for PI sheets that are no longer available and difficult to find, as well as to track the changes in both indications and adverse effects.
to:
[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/1563637480|''PDR: Physicians' Desk Reference 2010'']] 64th edition back through to 53rd edition of 1999.  Old copies of the ''PDR'' come in handy for PI sheets that are no longer available and difficult to find, as well as to track the changes in both indications and adverse effects.
2011-04-23 by JerodPoore -
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[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/1606235427|''The Bipolar Disorder Survival Guide'']] David J. Miklowitz, Ph.D.

[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0898626749|''Handbook of Affective Disorders'']] edited by Eugene S. Paykel, M.D. FRCPsych

[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0060897422|''Living Well with Depression and Bipolar Disorder: What Your Doctor Doesn't Tell You...That You Need to Know'']] John McManamy

''The New Chemotherapy in Mental Illness'' edited by Hirsch L. Gordon M.D., Ph.D., F.A.P.A. © 1958 Philosophical Library, Inc.  Published by Philosophical Library
2011-04-15 by JerodPoore -
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[[Genetic Basis of Drug Metabolism|http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/444804]]
to:
[[http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/444804|Genetic Basis of Drug Metabolism]]
2011-04-15 by JerodPoore -
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to:
[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0889373698|''Clinical Handbook of Psychotropic Drugs'']]  18th edition Adil S. Virani, K. Bezchlibnyk-Butler, J. Jeffries

[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0323040586|''Mosby's Drug Consult 2007'' (Generic Prescription Physician's Reference Book Series)]]  Also the 2004 edition, but only on pages that haven't been fully updated yet.

[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0393703916|''Instant Psychopharmacology'']] 2nd Edition Ronald J. Diamond M.D. © 2002. Published by W.W. Norton

[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/047175062X|''The Complete Guide to Psychiatric Drugs'']] Edward Drummond, M.D. © 2000. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/1563637480|''PDR: Physicians' Desk Reference 2010'']] 64th edition  back through to 53rd edition of 1999.  Old copies of the ''PDR'' come in handy for PI sheets that are no longer available and difficult to find, as well as to track the changes in both indications and adverse effects.


Added lines 46-49:

[[Genetic Basis of Drug Metabolism|http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/444804]]

2011-04-12 by JerodPoore -
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[[http://pdsp.med.unc.edu/kidb.php|The PDSP K'_i_' database]] All K'_i_' values, all the time.  These are the raw numbers used to determine the potency of certain aspects of medications, such as neurotransmitter reuptake inhibition.
2011-04-12 by JerodPoore -
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[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0521673763|''Stahl's Essential Psychopharmacology: Neuroscientific Basis and Practical Applications (Essential Psychopharmacology Series)'']] Third edition  by Stephen M. Stahl


[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/1429233435|''Primer of Drug Action'']] 12th edition by Robert M. Julien Ph.D., Claire D. Advokat, Joseph Comaty

[[http://astore.amazon.com/crazymedsorg-20/detail/0521743990|''The Prescriber's Guide (Essential Psychopharmacology Series)'']] Third edition by Stephen Stahl



2011-04-12 by JerodPoore -
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(:Title Know Your Sources :)
(:Description A guide to judging the trustworthiness of sites that dispense health information. :)
to:
(:Title Crazy Meds' General Bibliography :)
(:Description Books, papers, and sites that provide us with our background knowledge.:)
Changed lines 6-22 from:
Know your sources! Don't trust any random website. Just because it's on the Internet doesn't automatically make it true!

It's important for you to know if a website is trustworthy or not. The Internet is full of anonymous fearmongers who have nothing better to do than make you distrust a medication or therapy that could very well work for you just because it didn't work for them
.  Health information sites are accredited by the good people at [[http://www.hon.ch/|Health On the Net]]. To be accredited a site has to live up to their [[http://www.hon.ch/Conduct.html|Code of Conduct]]. If a site bears the seal of HON accreditation, then you can trust the information presented there.  The information may be out of date or incorrect, we've got plenty of that here, but at least it's an honest effort and probably no more wrong than most doctors.[[<<]]

Even if a site doesn't bother with HON accreditation, or is about something else entirely - although there
are plenty of organizations that certify accuracy for all sorts of things - there are a few things you can check to know if a website is as good, if not better, than the latest self-help book[^##book^].  This is what you should ask, along with our answers:
[^##book You're on your own in determining if the information in a self-help book is any good or not
.  I've yet to find a study on the matter.  There are plenty out there on bibliotherapy - using self-help books instead of, or along with traditional psychotherapy - but nothing about the accuracy of information regarding medication, or even how good diet books are when it comes to simple things like the caloric content of various foods.^]

[[Sources.CrazyPeople|Who are these crazy people?]]

[[Sources.Bibliography|Why do they think they know so much?]]

[[Sources.Money|Where does their money come from?]]

[[Sources.Privacy|Are they part of the CONSPIRACY that is monitoring my online activities?]]

[[Sources.Contact|How do you contact them?]]

to:
Here are the books, papers, and sites that comprise the foundation of what we know about neuropsychopharmacology.

[[http://www.neurotransmitter.net/|Neurotransmitter.net]] Tons of information and research
on psychiatric and neurological conditions, the drugs that treat them, and the rating scales used to measure the efficacy of said drugs.  All neatly indexed and categorized to make it easy to make sense of a bunch of diverse information. I had no idea [[http://www
.neurotransmitter.net/hangover.html|how much research was being done on hangovers]] until I hit this site.  I knew doctors liked to party (considering that my stepfather is a vascular surgeon I had a first-hand look at how much doctors liked to party), but who knew they were
getting grant money for it?  A key site for patients
, students and, most importantly, doctors of all stripes, shapes and sizes.

[[http://www.preskorn.com/|Sheldon Preskorn's Applied Clinical Psychopharmacology]] Dr. Preskorn has authored
over 300 scientific and professional articles, and many of them
are available at
this site, which is full of useful psychopharmacological data involving drug-drug interactions, methods of actions, clinical efficacies, pharmacokinetics and more.  Dr. Preskorn has received continuous grant
funding since 1978 for studies in the areas of psychopharmacology, neuroscience, and psychiatric illnesses
.

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[[http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/|PubMed]] You want studies, they got studies. Over 14 million citations covering 50 years of research. You'll find the majority of my online cites reference a Pub Med URL.  Especially helpful is [[http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/|PubMed Central]], the repository of full-text articles and online books that are available free of charge.  These are your tax dollars at work, people, make good use of them.

[[http://www.plosmedicine.org/home.action|PLoS Medicine]] The Public Library of Science is another great repository of free, peer-reviewed articles.
2011-01-31 by Jerod Poore -
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[[Who Are These Crazy People?]]

[[Other Useful Research Sites - a.k.a. Our Online Bibliography]]

[[The Dead Tree Bibliography]]

[[How to Read Our Drug Guides]]

[[How to Read US PI Sheets]]

[[Reviews & Ratings of Crazy Meds]]

[[Media Mentions of Crazy Meds]]

[[Site Statistics]]

[[Copyright Violators' and Plagiarizers' Hall of Shame]]

[[How This Site Is Funded]]

[[Advertising Policy]]

[[Privacy Policy
]]
to:
(:Title Know Your Sources :)
(:Description A guide to judging the trustworthiness of sites that dispense health information. :)
%comment%(:if expr ( auth admin || {$Author} {$$author} ):) {[foxedit form=Sources.EditArticle]} (:if:)%
>>font-family:arial font-size:4<<

Know your sources! Don't trust any random website. Just because it's on the Internet doesn't automatically make it true!

It's important for you to know if a website is trustworthy or not. The Internet is full of anonymous fearmongers who have nothing better to do than make you distrust a medication or therapy that could very well work for you just because it didn't work for them.  Health information sites are accredited by the good people at [[http://www.hon.ch/|Health On the Net]]. To be accredited a site has to live up to their [[http://www.hon.ch/Conduct.html|Code of Conduct]]. If a site bears the seal of HON accreditation, then you can trust the information presented there.  The information may be out of date or incorrect, we've got plenty of that here, but at least it's an honest effort and probably no more wrong than most doctors.[[<<]]

Even if a site doesn't bother with HON accreditation, or is about something else entirely - although there are plenty of organizations that certify accuracy for all sorts of things - there are a few things you can check to know if a website is as good, if not better, than the latest self-help book[^##book^].  This is what you should ask, along with our answers:
[^##book You're on your own in determining if the information in a self-help book is any good or not.  I've yet to find a study on the matter.  There are plenty out there on bibliotherapy - using self-help books instead of, or along with traditional psychotherapy - but nothing about the accuracy of information regarding medication, or even how good diet books are when it comes to simple things like the caloric content of various foods.^]

[[Sources.CrazyPeople|Who are these crazy people?]]

[[Sources.Bibliography|Why do they think they know so much?]]

[[Sources.Money|Where does their money come from?]]

[[Sources.Privacy|Are they part of the CONSPIRACY that is monitoring my online activities?]]

[[Sources.Contact|How do you contact them?]]

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(:GoogleSources:)
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[^#^]

>><<
[[<<]]
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>>font-family:arial font-size:3<<
Page created by: Jerod Poore.  Date created: 31 January 2011  Last edited by: {$Author}
>><<
[[<<]]
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(:include Sources.Copyright:)
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(:include Sources.Disclaimer:)
>><<
[[<<
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2010-09-10 by Jerod Poore -
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2010-09-10 by Jerod Poore -
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Powered by [[PmWiki,]] & Invision Power Board
2010-09-10 by Jerod Poore -
Added lines 1-20:
[[Who Are These Crazy People?]]
[[Other Useful Research Sites - a.k.a. Our Online Bibliography]]
[[The Dead Tree Bibliography]]
[[How to Read Our Drug Guides]]
[[How to Read US PI Sheets]]
[[Reviews & Ratings of Crazy Meds]]

[[Media Mentions of Crazy Meds]]

[[Site Statistics]]

[[Copyright Violators' and Plagiarizers' Hall of Shame]]

[[How This Site Is Funded]]

[[Advertising Policy]]

[[Privacy Policy]]

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