17 U.S. Code § 107 - Limitations on exclusive rights: Fair use

Notwithstanding the provisions of sections 106 and 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phonorecords or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright. In determining whether the use made of a work in any particular case is a fair use the factors to be considered shall include—
(1) the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for nonprofit educational purposes [all mirrored content falls under this clause, any ads present are mirrored from the original site, mirrored content earns me no revenue whatsoever];
(2) the nature of the copyrighted work [this is a unique resource for the mentally ill, and preservation of it can be argued to be incredibly important];
(3) the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole; and
(4) the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work. [none, as the original work no longer exists outside of archive.org and this website - update: the original site is intermittantly completely unavailable and has a SSL certificate that expired months ago, so this still holds as most users will be unable to access it easily if at all]
The fact that a work is unpublished shall not itself bar a finding of fair use if such finding is made upon consideration of all the above factors.

This domain is not controlled by Jerod Poore, and I will NOT continue redirecting traffic from this domain to crazymeds.us [as I formerly did] while Jerod continues with his immature temper tantrum over adblock or continues to fail to maintain his site, fucking over his entire community and countless visitors in the process.

This mirror is unfortunately incomplete (and very slightly outdated), as /CrazyTalk/ was not included when I scraped the site (it was far too large to scrape given the site's extremely poor performance, my wish to avoid worsening the poor performance further, and other factors). If you're looking for a replacement forum, I suggest visiting http://www.crazyboards.org/forums/. There are issues with many of the mirrored pages, I am working on identifying and fixing them, but I do not have the time to address every single issue at this moment (although by now the majority of these issues have been resolved). Dynamic content is obviously completely broken (this is beyond my control), and the loss of /CrazyTalk/ is quite bad given how much good user-generated info was on there, but you have Jerod to "thank" for that. Maybe I'll bring it back online at some point, but it wouldn't be the same as before. For now, I suggest visiting CrazyBoards instead.



including translations from doctorese of side effects, medical conditions, notations found on medical charts and prescriptions, and more




Originally compiled by Maddy way back (2005) on the YaBB 1 incarnation of Crazy Talk. This edition of definitions deals with the medical abbreviations, acronyms and initialisms (AA&Is) you’ll come across on our medication wiki pages and other primarily US-based sites dealing with psychiatric or neurological conditions. We’re also dealing with many more medical terms, along with terms and phrases used on Crazymeds that aren’t used in a lot of other places, if anywhere else at all. For more medical AA&Is, terminology, and a lot of generally useful information see Global RPh and Janssen’s page of “important” terms used by (mental)healthcare professionals. For Internet-specific and other terms and AA&Is see the Internet Acronyms Dictionary, InternetSlang.com, abbreviations.com, and Urban Dictionary.

What’s the difference?

  • An abbreviation is just a shortening of a word, such as OXC for oxcarbazepine. Abbreviations usually aren’t capitalized, but they are in research papers and other medical texts when referring to drugs. Sometimes it’s pronounced as a word (e.g: cap for capsule, med for medication).
  • An initialism is made by taking the first letter of more than one word, like PCP for Primary Care Physician, or a few letters from one word that begin each syllable, like BP for Bipolar and LTG for lamotrigine.2 When speaking you say each letter.
  • An acronym is an initialism that spells something, like GABA for Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid or SNAFU for Situation Normal: All Fucked Up. When speaking you say it as one or more words.

Numbers   A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z




Stick to your treatment plan with buttons and magnets. 2.25″ $4 & 3.5″ $4.50 at Straitjacket T-shirts
Pile of Pills buttons at Straitjacket T-shirts
Pile of Pills
Vaccines Cause Immunity buttons at Straitjacket T-shirts
Vaccines Cause Immunity
Medicated For Your Protection magnets at Straitjacket T-shirts
Medicated For Your Protection
Fuck Bipolar buttons at Straitjacket T-shirts
Fuck Bipolar


5150
Seventy-two hour3 hospitalization for treatment and evaluation when patient is considered a threat to self or others. WELFARE AND INSTITUTIONS CODE SECTION 5150-5157
5-HT
The neurotransmitter 5-hydroxytryptamine, better known as serotonin.

With a plethora of receptors and subtypes identified as 5-HT1a to 1-I don’t know, 5-HT2a to 2-again I don’t know, up through 5-HT7. Although there are probably more.
5-HT is involved with so many functions I doubt if the neurotransmitter itself does anything besides carrying instructions between and within neurons.
Also abbreviated 5HT. I haven’t found consensus on subscript for subtypes. For more on neurotransmitters, receptors and the like, see the page on Pharmacodynamics.

5HT

AAP
Atypical Antipsychotic. As ‘atypical’ APs are being prescribed far more often than the standard APs, this term has been superseded by Second-Generation AP (SGA) and Third-Generation AP (TGA).

See the page on antipsychotics for more information.
In reality AAP is still used far more often on consumer-oriented mental health sites.

Abnormal
Whenever you see “abnormal” as part of a side effect (“thinking abnormal”, “abnormal ejaculation” e.g.) it means there has a whole bunch of ways something has gone wrong, but it’s pointless to list them all. Especially since there will always be new ways for it to go wrong. While everything imaginable is unlikely (I doubt anyone taking Lexapro is going to ejaculate goldfish), who knows what could happen (goldfish-colored cum isn’t off the table).
abnormal
Whenever you see “abnormal” as part of a side effect (“thinking abnormal”, “abnormal ejaculation” e.g.) it means there has a whole bunch of ways something has gone wrong, but it’s pointless to list them all. Especially since there will always be new ways for it to go wrong. While everything imaginable is unlikely (I doubt anyone taking Lexapro is going to ejaculate goldfish), who knows what could happen (goldfish-colored cum isn’t off the table).

AC
Anticonvulsant. Antiepileptic Drug (AED) is the preferred term here, but AC is used more often on sites that deal mostly or exclusively with mental health or other conditions not related to epilepsy.
a.c.
before meals. From ante cibum.

ACh
The neurotransmitter acetylcholine. Its receptors come in two flavors - muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR), although they are most often referred to as plain old muscarinic, M1 through M5, and nicotinic, N1 & N2. N1 and N2 have many subtypes, at least α1–α9 and β1–β4.

For more on neurotransmitters, receptors and the like, see the page on Pharmacodynamics.

ACh
Acetylcholine
acetylcholine

ACTH
Adrenocorticotropic Hormone. AKA The. most. expensive. crazy med on the planet, retailing at US$23,000 a treatment for the uninsured / people with really crappy less than excellent insurance.4

Activating
How psychiatrists and members of support group and consumer-oriented medical sites describe the stimulant-like effect

(i.e. after taking the med it feels as if you just had three or four cups of coffee) of a drug that is not a stimulant,
and whose MOA does not directly affect dopamine or similar brain juices.
On support group sites it is almost always written in quotes. (Is Lexapro “activating?” e.g.)

activating
How psychiatrists and members of support group and consumer-oriented medical sites describe the stimulant-like effect

Active Metabolite
When a drug is broken by the metabolization process there are often metabolites.

Most of the time these metabolites don’t do anything except get flushed down the toilet, or get broken down further before getting flushed.
Sometimes they do something, in which case they’re called active metabolites, and the term “transformed” is used instead of “broken down.”
To what extent an active metabolite does anything is highly variable, ranging from “practically nothing” (Zoloft e.g.) to “it’s the active metabolite, and not what’s in the pill, that does all the work,” (Effexor, Risperdal, tamoxifen, e.g.). Cf. metabolite, prodrug.
For more information on metabolization and the like, see the Page on Pharmacokinetics and Metabolism

Active Metabolite
{$:Active Metabolite}
Active Metabolites
{$:Active Metabolite}
Active metabolite
{$:Active Metabolite}
Active metabolites
{$:Active Metabolite}
active metabolite
{$:Active Metabolite}
active metabolites
{$:Active Metabolite}

AD
Antidepressant

Add-on
A drug prescribed to be taken with a drug you’re already taking in order to boost the effects of the first drug.
add-ons
A drug prescribed to be taken with a drug you’re already taking in order to boost the effects of the first drug.
Add-ons
A drug prescribed to be taken with a drug you’re already taking in order to boost the effects of the first drug.
add-on
A drug prescribed to be taken with a drug you’re already taking in order to boost the effects of the first drug.

ADD
Attention Deficit Disorder/Difference.

ADHD
Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder/Difference.

ADHD

ADD/ADHD
Indicates that something deals with either or both ADD and ADHD.

Adjunctive
A drug prescribed to be taken with a drug you’re already taking in order to boost the effects of the first drug.
Adjunctives
A drug prescribed to be taken with a drug you’re already taking in order to boost the effects of the first drug.
adjunctives
A drug prescribed to be taken with a drug you’re already taking in order to boost the effects of the first drug.
adjunctive
A drug prescribed to be taken with a drug you’re already taking in order to boost the effects of the first drug.

ADKH
All Drugs Known to Humankind. Usually said by people who have yet to take half, if that, of the medications approved, let alone commonly used, to treat whatever condition they have.

Adverse Effects
Doctorese for side effects.
Adverse effect
{$:Adverse Effect}
Adverse effects
{$:Adverse Effects}
Adverse effect
{$:Adverse Effects}
adverse effect
{$:Adverse Effects}
adverse effects
{$:Adverse Effects}

Adverse Events
Doctorese for side effects.
Adverse events
Adverse event
Adverse event
adverse event
adverse events

AdverseReactions
Doctorese for side effects.
Adverse reactions
Doctorese for side effects.
adverse reactions
Doctorese for side effects.
adverse reaction
Doctorese for side effects.
Adverse reaction
Doctorese for side effects.

AED
Antiepileptic Drug. The term we prefer to anticonvulsant. Cf. Mood stabilizer.

Agonist
A substance that binds (attaches itself) to the receptor of a neurotransmitter to regulate the amount of the neurotransmitter the receptor is able to receive.5

When used by itself it generally means a drug that enhances brain juice, but technically it means any action by any stuff that sticks to a receptor.
So antagonists are a type of agonist, and a normally functioning receptor has an agonist. Cf. Antagonist.
For more on neurotransmitters, receptors and the like, see the page on Pharmacodynamics.

agonist
A substance that binds (attaches itself) to the receptor of a neurotransmitter to regulate the amount of the neurotransmitter the receptor is able to receive.5
agonists
A substance that binds (attaches itself) to the receptor of a neurotransmitter to regulate the amount of the neurotransmitter the receptor is able to receive.5
Agonists
A substance that binds (attaches itself) to the receptor of a neurotransmitter to regulate the amount of the neurotransmitter the receptor is able to receive.5
Agranulocytosis
A blood dyscrasia.

Alopecia
Doctorese for hair loss, baldness.

As a side effect it can be anywhere from hair thinning to losing all of your hair, including your eyebrows, eyelashes, arm hair, nostril hair, and anywhere else you might have hair. Full-on alopecia is a common side effect of oncology (cancer) chemotherapy - AKA chemo - and extremely rare for anything else.
The medical condition alopecia, when not caused by drugs or toxins, is when you lose all of your hair everywhere.
Since this term derived from the Greek alopekia (αλωπεκία), which means “mangy fox”, Merck is able to get away with calling their anti-baldness drug “Propecia,” because, linguistically, it doesn’t promote shit.
Although it could be interpreted to promote mange as much as promote hair growth.6

alopecia
Doctorese for hair loss, baldness.
Amnesia
I forgot what this one means.

ANT
Automatic Negative Thoughts. Intrusive, unbidden thoughts that keep rolling around in your head whenever you have no one else around to tell you what a stupid, worthless, useless, fucked-up piece of shit you are.

Antagonist
A drug that binds (attaches itself) to the receptor of a neurotransmitter to reduce the amount of the neurotransmitter the receptor is able to receive. Cf. Agonist

For more on neurotransmitters, receptors and the like, see the page on Pharmacodynamics.

antagonist
A drug that binds (attaches itself) to the receptor of a neurotransmitter to reduce the amount of the neurotransmitter the receptor is able to receive. Cf. Agonist
antagonists
A drug that binds (attaches itself) to the receptor of a neurotransmitter to reduce the amount of the neurotransmitter the receptor is able to receive. Cf. Agonist
Antagonists
A drug that binds (attaches itself) to the receptor of a neurotransmitter to reduce the amount of the neurotransmitter the receptor is able to receive. Cf. Agonist

Anticholinergic
Something associated with an antagonist of one of the ACh receptors, typically a Muscarinic Receptor.

Most of the time it refers to these side effects:

  • Anorexia (weight loss)
  • Blurry vision
  • Confusion
  • Constipation
  • Dry Mouth
  • Sedation
  • Stasis of urine (fancy doctorese for urinary retention, or: sitting/standing there and nothing happens for what seems like half an hour)

For more about anticholinergic side effects see the Anticholinergic Section of the Side Effects Page
For more on neurotransmitters, antagonists and the like, see the page on Pharmacodynamics.

anticholinergic
Something associated with an antagonist of one of the ACh receptors, typically a Muscarinic Receptor.

Anticonvulsant
Anticonvulsant. Antiepileptic Drug (AED) is the preferred term here, but AC is used more often on sites that deal mostly or exclusively with mental health or other conditions not related to epilepsy.
Anticonvulsants
Anticonvulsant. Antiepileptic Drug (AED) is the preferred term here, but AC is used more often on sites that deal mostly or exclusively with mental health or other conditions not related to epilepsy.
anticonvulsants
Anticonvulsant. Antiepileptic Drug (AED) is the preferred term here, but AC is used more often on sites that deal mostly or exclusively with mental health or other conditions not related to epilepsy.
anticonvulsants
Anticonvulsant. Antiepileptic Drug (AED) is the preferred term here, but AC is used more often on sites that deal mostly or exclusively with mental health or other conditions not related to epilepsy.

Anxiety Spectrum Disorder
A term that covers the entire alphabet soup of panic/anxiety disorders - GAD, OCD, PD, PTSD, and SAnD.

While popular in The Literature, very few consumer-oriented sites (i.e. Crazymeds seems to be the only one.) use the term.

Anxiety Spectrum Disorder
anxiety spectrum disorder
Anxiety spectrum disorder
Anxiety Spectrum Disorders
anxiety spectrum disorders
Anxiety spectrum disorders

AP
Antipsychotic regardless of generation, type, etc.

Approval
In order to be sold in the US, a drug needs to be approved by the FDA to treat something. This a drug is brand-new is a years-long process involving dozens of animal and human studies and trials and enormous amounts of money. If it is for a generic version or new use of an existing drug, it’s still expensive, but less so.
approval
In order to be sold in the US, a drug needs to be approved by the FDA to treat something. This a drug is brand-new is a years-long process involving dozens of animal and human studies and trials and enormous amounts of money. If it is for a generic version or new use of an existing drug, it’s still expensive, but less so.
approved
In order to be sold in the US, a drug needs to be approved by the FDA to treat something. This a drug is brand-new is a years-long process involving dozens of animal and human studies and trials and enormous amounts of money. If it is for a generic version or new use of an existing drug, it’s still expensive, but less so.
Approved
In order to be sold in the US, a drug needs to be approved by the FDA to treat something. This a drug is brand-new is a years-long process involving dozens of animal and human studies and trials and enormous amounts of money. If it is for a generic version or new use of an existing drug, it’s still expensive, but less so.
FDA-approval
In order to be sold in the US, a drug needs to be approved by the FDA to treat something. This a drug is brand-new is a years-long process involving dozens of animal and human studies and trials and enormous amounts of money. If it is for a generic version or new use of an existing drug, it’s still expensive, but less so.
FDA-approved
In order to be sold in the US, a drug needs to be approved by the FDA to treat something. This a drug is brand-new is a years-long process involving dozens of animal and human studies and trials and enormous amounts of money. If it is for a generic version or new use of an existing drug, it’s still expensive, but less so.
FDA-Approved
In order to be sold in the US, a drug needs to be approved by the FDA to treat something. This a drug is brand-new is a years-long process involving dozens of animal and human studies and trials and enormous amounts of money. If it is for a generic version or new use of an existing drug, it’s still expensive, but less so.
FDA-Approval
In order to be sold in the US, a drug needs to be approved by the FDA to treat something. This a drug is brand-new is a years-long process involving dozens of animal and human studies and trials and enormous amounts of money. If it is for a generic version or new use of an existing drug, it’s still expensive, but less so.
FDA approval
In order to be sold in the US, a drug needs to be approved by the FDA to treat something. This a drug is brand-new is a years-long process involving dozens of animal and human studies and trials and enormous amounts of money. If it is for a generic version or new use of an existing drug, it’s still expensive, but less so.
FDA approved
In order to be sold in the US, a drug needs to be approved by the FDA to treat something. This a drug is brand-new is a years-long process involving dozens of animal and human studies and trials and enormous amounts of money. If it is for a generic version or new use of an existing drug, it’s still expensive, but less so.
FDA Approved
In order to be sold in the US, a drug needs to be approved by the FDA to treat something. This a drug is brand-new is a years-long process involving dozens of animal and human studies and trials and enormous amounts of money. If it is for a generic version or new use of an existing drug, it’s still expensive, but less so.
FDA Approval
In order to be sold in the US, a drug needs to be approved by the FDA to treat something. This a drug is brand-new is a years-long process involving dozens of animal and human studies and trials and enormous amounts of money. If it is for a generic version or new use of an existing drug, it’s still expensive, but less so.

ARI
aripiprazole Generic for Abilify.

ASD
Autistic Spectrum Disorder. Less frequently Asperger’s Syndrome Disorder or Asperger’s Disorder, which has been rolled into the general Autistic Spectrum Disorder diagnosis with DSM-5.

Also Anxiety Spectrum Disorder

Asthenia
Physical weakness.
Arthralgia
Joint pain. If you have arthritis one of your symptoms is usually arthralgia.
Ataxia
Can’t walk two steps without falling over.

Atypical antipsychotic
Atypical Antipsychotic. As ‘atypical’ APs are being prescribed far more often than the standard APs, this term has been superseded by Second-Generation AP (SGA) and Third-Generation AP (TGA).
atypical antipsychotics
Atypical Antipsychotic. As ‘atypical’ APs are being prescribed far more often than the standard APs, this term has been superseded by Second-Generation AP (SGA) and Third-Generation AP (TGA).
atypical antipsychotic
Atypical Antipsychotic. As ‘atypical’ APs are being prescribed far more often than the standard APs, this term has been superseded by Second-Generation AP (SGA) and Third-Generation AP (TGA).
Atypical antipsychotics
Atypical Antipsychotic. As ‘atypical’ APs are being prescribed far more often than the standard APs, this term has been superseded by Second-Generation AP (SGA) and Third-Generation AP (TGA).
Atypical Antipsychotic
Atypical Antipsychotic. As ‘atypical’ APs are being prescribed far more often than the standard APs, this term has been superseded by Second-Generation AP (SGA) and Third-Generation AP (TGA).
Atypical Antipsychotics
Atypical Antipsychotic. As ‘atypical’ APs are being prescribed far more often than the standard APs, this term has been superseded by Second-Generation AP (SGA) and Third-Generation AP (TGA).

ATX
atomoxetine, generic for Strattera.
As at least half a dozen other meds use ATX this initialism isn’t used much outside of the papers published about atomoxetine.

BC
Birth Control

bc
because - in text, chat, etc.

BCP
Birth Control Pill (aka “The Pill”)

BD
Bipolar Disorder, but not commonly used outside of papers about mood disorders.

Also a pediatric psychological/psychiatric & special education initialism for Behavioral Disorder.

b.i.d.
Twice a day from the Latin bis in die. Also BID.
BID
{$:b.i.d.}

Big Pharma
The nickname given to the pharmaceutical industry, especially the largest companies like Eli Lilly (Lilly to their friends7) and GlaxoSmithKline (GSK).

The name comes from the industry’s lobbying group - the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhaRMA).

Bioequivalence
The primary parameter, along with bioavailability, used to determine if a generic drug is essentially the same as the brand-name version.

Bioequivalence is all about PK, potency never enters the equation.

bioequivalence
The primary parameter, along with bioavailability, used to determine if a generic drug is essentially the same as the brand-name version.

Bi-polar
How people who are in denial about their bipolar disorder diagnosis tend to write the word “bipolar.”
bi-polar
How people who are in denial about their bipolar disorder diagnosis tend to write the word “bipolar.”
Bi-Polar
How people who are in denial about their bipolar disorder diagnosis tend to write the word “bipolar.”

Bi-polor
Like bi-polar, but with more shock, confusion and panic. Or because they can’t spell “polar.”
bi-polor
Like bi-polar, but with more shock, confusion and panic. Or because they can’t spell “polar.”
Bi-Polor
Like bi-polar, but with more shock, confusion and panic. Or because they can’t spell “polar.”

Blood Dyscrasias
Assorted ways a drug can eat your blood. The most popular are leukopenia, neutropenia, and agranulocytosis, which are all doctorese for: “That damn med is eating my white blood cells! Take me off of it right the hell NOW!” Antipsychotics, especially Clozaril (clozapine), and antiepileptic drugs, especially Tegretol / Equetro (carbamazepine), are the crazy meds most likely to cause these uncommon problems.
Blood Dyscrasia
{$:Blood Dyscrasias}
Blood dyscrasia
{$:Blood Dyscrasias}
Blood dyscrasias
{$:Blood Dyscrasias}
blood dyscrasia
{$:Blood Dyscrasias}
blood dyscrasias
{$:Blood Dyscrasias}

BP
Bipolar. Used primarily on consumer/patient sites dealing with brain cooties. It may be used with various modifiers (I, II, RC, UC, e.g.).

Also Blood Pressure, but that’s used more often on medical charts, in the ED/ER, and anywhere blood pressure is discussed in The Literature.

BPAD
Bipolar Affective Disorder. Bipolar disorder’s official name in the DSM and The Literature.

BPD
Borderline Personality Disorder.
Sometimes Bipolar Disorder. As the two are often comorbid, this can lead to great confusion.

Brain Cooties
Value-neutral term coined at Crazymeds to describe any sort of neurological or psychiatric condition. Based upon the childhood STD that carries heavy social stigma.
brain cooties
Brain cooties
Brain Cooties

Brain Juice
Neurotransmitters and other tasty chemicals in your brain.

For more on neurotransmitters, receptors and the like, see the page on Pharmacodynamics.

Brain juice
brain juice
Brain Juices
Brain juices
brain juices

Brain Pacemaker
Originally the Vagus Nerve Stimulator (VNS), now used more often to describe Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS).
Brain Pacemaker
Brain pacemaker
brain pacemaker
Brain Pacemakers
Brain pacemakers
brain pacemakers

BrandedGeneric
A term with three meanings. The first two are the ones we use most often on Crazymeds.

1) A generic drug the same active ingredient as the original given a ‘brand’ name by the generics manufacturer. The name is usually similar to the generic drug (Teva’s Budeprion for bupropion e.g.), but sometimes can be completely off the wall (Pisa Farmaceutica’s Mazda for venlafaxine). The most common branded generic name is a hyphenate of the generic name and the company name (Venlafaxine-Teva e.g.), closely followed by part of the generic name and all or part of the company name smushed together (Venlanofi, from Venlafaxine and Sanofi-Winthrop).
2) A drug with a different chemical salt of the original med’s active ingredient, like Sanofi-Aventis’ Aplenzin, which is bupropion hydrobromide.
3) A generic version of the brand-name med that is made by a generics manufacturer owned by company that makes the brand-name med. Greenstone Pharmaceuticals is Pfizer’s generics manufacturer, so Greenstone’s gabapentin really is exactly the same as Parke-Davis’ (a subsidiary of Pfizer) Neurontin.
For even more information see this section of the Brand Name vs. Generic Medications page.

Branded generic
A term with three meanings. The first two are the ones we use most often on Crazymeds.
branded generic
A term with three meanings. The first two are the ones we use most often on Crazymeds.
Branded Generics
A term with three meanings. The first two are the ones we use most often on Crazymeds.
Branded generics
A term with three meanings. The first two are the ones we use most often on Crazymeds.
branded generics
A term with three meanings. The first two are the ones we use most often on Crazymeds.

BUP
bupropion Generic for Wellbutrin

CAP
Community-Acquired Pneumonia. AKA that’s what you get for not washing your hands after opening doors, using pens, or generally touching anything anyone else could have used.

Cap
Capsule.
cap
Capsule.
caps
Capsule.
Caps
Capsule.

CAT
Computerized Axial Tomography. Where a shitload of x-ray views are converted into 3D-looking images.

As you get a shitload of x-rays, you probably don’t want too many of these done. Cf. SPECT and PET.

CAT scan
Computerized Axial Tomography. Where a shitload of x-ray views are converted into 3D-looking images.

Since “tomography” means scan, the “scan” is redundant, like the “Beach” in Playa del Rey Beach.
CAT scans
Computerized Axial Tomography. Where a shitload of x-ray views are converted into 3D-looking images.

Since “tomography” means scan, the “scan” is redundant, like the “Beach” in Playa del Rey Beach.
CAT Scan
Computerized Axial Tomography. Where a shitload of x-ray views are converted into 3D-looking images.

Since “tomography” means scan, the “scan” is redundant, like the “Beach” in Playa del Rey Beach.
CAT Scans
Computerized Axial Tomography. Where a shitload of x-ray views are converted into 3D-looking images.

Since “tomography” means scan, the “scan” is redundant, like the “Beach” in Playa del Rey Beach.

CBC
Complete Blood Count. AKA Blood Panel. A blood test anyone taking any crazy med should get at least once a year.

With some drugs you need to get it more often, with others you need to get other tests as well.

CBT
Cognitive Behavior Therapy - a type of talk therapy proven to be effective in treating depression.

CBZ
carbamazepine Generic for Tegretol.

Cf.
Compare with, see also. From the Latin “confer,” literally meaning “bring together.”
cf.
{$:Cf.}
cf
{$:Cf.}
Cf
{$:Cf.}
CF
{$:Cf.}

Chemical Salt
Science class definition - an ionic compound produced by reacting (essentially mixing) an acid with a base. With crazy meds it’s usually either hydrochloric or hydrobromic acid. Cf. Pharmaceutical salt.
Chemical Salt
Chemical salt
chemical salt
Chemical Salts
Chemical salts
chemical salts

Chemotherapy
using drugs to treat a medical condition when there are non-medication treatments available. These days “chemotherapy” and “chemo” generally apply to cancer treatments (oncology). Technically, and ever-so-pedantically, treating almost anything with a drug, including doing something like taking ibuprofen or another NSAID for the swelling from a sprained joint, is chemotherapy, because you can use an icepack or just walk it off, pussy.
chemotherapy
using drugs to treat a medical condition when there are non-medication treatments available. These days “chemotherapy” and “chemo” generally apply to cancer treatments (oncology). Technically, and ever-so-pedantically, treating almost anything with a drug, including doing something like taking ibuprofen or another NSAID for the swelling from a sprained joint, is chemotherapy, because you can use an icepack or just walk it off, pussy.

CI
for medications it stands for contraindicated. Don’t take a drug under the listed circumstances.

The most CYA wording in every PI sheet ever published is along the lines of, “Panacea is contraindicated for people who are allergic to Panacea or any of its ingredients.”
In statistics it stands for Confidence Interval.

CIT
citalopram Generic for Celexa

CLZ
clozapine.

CNS
Central Nervous System

Cocktail
When you’re taking at the very minimum three, but usually four or more different medications to treat one or more conditions, the combination is called a “drug cocktail,” or cocktail for short.
cocktails
When you’re taking at the very minimum three, but usually four or more different medications to treat one or more conditions, the combination is called a “drug cocktail,” or cocktail for short.
Cocktails
When you’re taking at the very minimum three, but usually four or more different medications to treat one or more conditions, the combination is called a “drug cocktail,” or cocktail for short.
cocktail
When you’re taking at the very minimum three, but usually four or more different medications to treat one or more conditions, the combination is called a “drug cocktail,” or cocktail for short.

Cold Turkey
Slang for when you suddenly stop taking a drug without gradually decreasing the dosage. This is usually an incredibly stupid idea.

The term originally applied to opium-derivatives like morphine and heroin, but now applies to when you abruptly cease any habit.
Sometimes abbreviated as CT, but that isn’t used much on medical boards as CT is a type of scan.

Cold turkey
cold turkey

Comorbid
A condition that you have along with another condition. It implies that the first condition is more serious.
comorbid
A condition that you have along with another condition. It implies that the first condition is more serious.
conc
Concentration, as in condensed, and not thinking intently on one thing.

Conventional Antipsychotic
A retronym for first-generation antipsychotics (FGAs) to distinguish them from atypical antipsychotics (AAPs) / second-generation APs (SGAs). Less used than Typical AP and Standard AP.
Conventional Antipsychotic
Conventional antipsychotic
conventional antipsychotic
Conventional Antipsychotics
Conventional antipsychotics
conventional antipsychotics

CP
Complex Partial (seizure), Cerebral Palsy, and 200 others

CPZ
chlorpromazine Generic for Thorazine

CR
Controlled Release

Crazy Meds
When two words - a generic term for medications used to treat brain cooties. When one word, capitalized, the website you’re reading8.
crazy meds
{$:Crazy Meds}
Crazy meds
{$:Crazy Meds}
Crazymeds
{$:Crazy Meds}

CT
Computerized Tomography. Short for Computerized Axial Tomography. Where a shitload of x-ray views are converted into 3D-looking images.

CT scan
Computerized Tomography scan. Short for Computerized Axial Tomography. Where a shitload of x-ray views are converted into 3D-looking images.

Since “tomography” means scan, the “scan” is redundant, like the “Mountains” in Sierra Nevada Mountains.

CT scans
Computerized Tomography scans. Short for Computerized Axial Tomography. Where a shitload of x-ray views are converted into 3D-looking images.

Since “tomography” means scan, the “scan” is redundant, like the “Mountains” in Sierra Nevada Mountains.

CT Scans
Computerized Tomography scans. Short for Computerized Axial Tomography. Where a shitload of x-ray views are converted into 3D-looking images.

Since “tomography” means scan, the “scan” is redundant, like the “Mountains” in Sierra Nevada Mountains.

CT Scan
Computerized Tomography scans. Short for Computerized Axial Tomography. Where a shitload of x-ray views are converted into 3D-looking images.

As “tomography” means scan, the “scan” is redundant, like the “Mountains” in Sierra Nevada Mountains.

CYA
Cover your ass. Why drug companies do some many most of the annoying fucked-up things they do.

CYP
Cytochrome P450. It usually refers to the enzymes, but also the genes responsible for their production.

Found mainly in your liver, as well as your brain and elsewhere, CYP450 enzymes are what do most of the work to metabolize / transform drugs, herbal supplements, toxins, etc.
See this page for a list of popular meds, etc. metabolized by popular CYP enzymes. Cf. UGT enzymes.
For more information on CYP enzymes the like, see the Page on Pharmacokinetics and Metabolism.

CYP 450
Cytochrome P450. It usually refers to the enzymes, but also the genes responsible for their production.
CYP450
Cytochrome P450. It usually refers to the enzymes, but also the genes responsible for their production.
CYP1A1
Cytochrome P450. It usually refers to the enzymes, but also the genes responsible for their production.
CYP1A1/2
Cytochrome P450. It usually refers to the enzymes, but also the genes responsible for their production.
CYP1A2
Cytochrome P450. It usually refers to the enzymes, but also the genes responsible for their production.
CYP2B6
Cytochrome P450. It usually refers to the enzymes, but also the genes responsible for their production.
CYP2C8
Cytochrome P450. It usually refers to the enzymes, but also the genes responsible for their production.
CYP2C9
Cytochrome P450. It usually refers to the enzymes, but also the genes responsible for their production.
CYP2C19
Cytochrome P450. It usually refers to the enzymes, but also the genes responsible for their production.
CYP2D6
Cytochrome P450. It usually refers to the enzymes, but also the genes responsible for their production.
CYP2E1
Cytochrome P450. It usually refers to the enzymes, but also the genes responsible for their production.
CYP3A4
Cytochrome P450. It usually refers to the enzymes, but also the genes responsible for their production.
CYP3A4/5
Cytochrome P450. It usually refers to the enzymes, but also the genes responsible for their production.
CYP3A5
Cytochrome P450. It usually refers to the enzymes, but also the genes responsible for their production.

D1
Dopamine receptor one.
D2
Dopamine receptor two. This is the receptor that practically every antipsychotic on the planet works on. For more on neurotransmitters, receptors and the like, see the page on Pharmacodynamics.
D3
Dopamine receptor three. This is a popular receptor that many antipsychotics work on. For more on neurotransmitters, receptors and the like, see the page on Pharmacodynamics.
D4
Dopamine receptor four.
D5
Dopamine receptor five.

DA
The neurotransmitter dopamine. The known receptors are D1 to D5. For more on neurotransmitters, receptors and the like, see the page on Pharmacodynamics.

DAT
The dopamine transporter. For more on neurotransmitters, receptors and the like, see the page on Pharmacodynamics.

DAW
Dispense As Written. How your doctor tells your pharmacist to give you the brand name med instead of the generic. You and your pharmacist still get to fight with the insurance company.

DBS
Deep Brain Stimulation. The new brain pacemaker (cf. VNS). Approved to Parkinson’s disease and related movement-disorders, used off-label as an experimental treatment for practically every treatment-resistant psychiatric or neurological condition there is.

DBT
Dialectical Behavioral Therapy. AKA CBT for those with BPD.

DC
Discontinue. To stop taking a med. Along with a dozen other non-medical things (direct current, e.g.). Also D/C and d/c.
D/C
Discontinue. To stop taking a med. Along with a dozen other non-medical things (direct current, e.g.). Also D/C and d/c.
d/c
Discontinue. To stop taking a med. Along with a dozen other non-medical things (direct current, e.g.). Also D/C and d/c.

Deja Vu
The sensation of having experienced a situation, event or something else at least once before. That doesn’t happen all the time. Like waking up in the gutter after a long night of … hey, what happens in meth-lab trailer park stays in …

Frequent instances of déjà vu can be a side effect of AEDs as well as a symptom of epilepsy or something else that causes too much activity in your right temporal lobe and/or too little activity in your left temporal lobe. From the French for “seen again.” Cf. Jamais vu.

Déjà Vu
Déjà vu
déjà vu
Deja Vu
Deja vu
deja vu

Depersonalized
You know that feeling of not being a participant in your life, just an observer? Depersonalization is where that feeling is taken to such an extreme that you’re essentially a disembodied entity of some sort watching someone else going through the motions of a life. Depersonalization Disorder is when you’re like that 24/7.
depersonalized
You know that feeling of not being a participant in your life, just an observer? Depersonalization is where that feeling is taken to such an extreme that you’re essentially a disembodied entity of some sort watching someone else going through the motions of a life. Depersonalization Disorder is when you’re like that 24/7.
Depersonalization
You know that feeling of not being a participant in your life, just an observer? Depersonalization is where that feeling is taken to such an extreme that you’re essentially a disembodied entity of some sort watching someone else going through the motions of a life. Depersonalization Disorder is when you’re like that 24/7.
Depersonalization Disorder
You know that feeling of not being a participant in your life, just an observer? Depersonalization is where that feeling is taken to such an extreme that you’re essentially a disembodied entity of some sort watching someone else going through the motions of a life. Depersonalization Disorder is when you’re like that 24/7.
depersonalization
You know that feeling of not being a participant in your life, just an observer? Depersonalization is where that feeling is taken to such an extreme that you’re essentially a disembodied entity of some sort watching someone else going through the motions of a life. Depersonalization Disorder is when you’re like that 24/7.
depersonalization disorder
You know that feeling of not being a participant in your life, just an observer? Depersonalization is where that feeling is taken to such an extreme that you’re essentially a disembodied entity of some sort watching someone else going through the motions of a life. Depersonalization Disorder is when you’re like that 24/7.

Derealization
Similar to depersonalization, but instead of being outside of yourself and being an observer of your life, you’re outside of the entire world and watching it as if it were a bad TV show. It’s the feeling of nothing being real and nothing mattering. Derealization Disorder is when you’re like that 24/7.
derealized
Similar to depersonalization, but instead of being outside of yourself and being an observer of your life, you’re outside of the entire world and watching it as if it were a bad TV show. It’s the feeling of nothing being real and nothing mattering. Derealization Disorder is when you’re like that 24/7.
Derealized
Similar to depersonalization, but instead of being outside of yourself and being an observer of your life, you’re outside of the entire world and watching it as if it were a bad TV show. It’s the feeling of nothing being real and nothing mattering. Derealization Disorder is when you’re like that 24/7.
Derealization Disorder
Similar to depersonalization, but instead of being outside of yourself and being an observer of your life, you’re outside of the entire world and watching it as if it were a bad TV show. It’s the feeling of nothing being real and nothing mattering. Derealization Disorder is when you’re like that 24/7.
derealization
Similar to depersonalization, but instead of being outside of yourself and being an observer of your life, you’re outside of the entire world and watching it as if it were a bad TV show. It’s the feeling of nothing being real and nothing mattering. Derealization Disorder is when you’re like that 24/7.
derealization disorder
Similar to depersonalization, but instead of being outside of yourself and being an observer of your life, you’re outside of the entire world and watching it as if it were a bad TV show. It’s the feeling of nothing being real and nothing mattering. Derealization Disorder is when you’re like that 24/7.

Diagnostic and Statistical Manual
The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. The big-ass collection of billing codes doctors use to determine how to charge your insurance for whatever the hell is wrong with you.

DID
Dissociative Identity Disorder - the newer and preferred term for Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD)

dil
Dilute

Diplopia
Doctorese for double vision. From the Greek diploús (διπλούς) for double and opia (a Latinization of optica οπτικά) relating to the eye9.
diplopia
Doctorese for double vision. From the Greek diploús (διπλούς) for double and opia (a Latinization of optica οπτικά) relating to the eye9.

div
Divide

DMI
desipramine

Doctorese
The medical jargon found in The Literature, prescribing information (PI), Patient information leaflets (PILs), and websites that merely reformat the last two for most, if not all, of their content about medications (Rxlist, MedicineNet, MedLine Plus, NAMBLA.org NAMI.org e.g.).
doctorese
The medical jargon found in The Literature, prescribing information (PI), Patient information leaflets (PILs), and websites that merely reformat the last two for most, if not all, of their content about medications (Rxlist, MedicineNet, MedLine Plus, NAMBLA.org NAMI.org e.g.).

Dopamax
A nickname for Topamax. Because it makes you feel like such a dope. Cf.
dopamax
A nickname for Topamax. Because it makes you feel like such a dope. Cf.

Dopamine
Everybody’s favorite neurotransmitter. The known receptors are D1 to D5.

For more on neurotransmitters, receptors and the like, see the page on Pharmacodynamics.

dopamine
Everybody’s favorite neurotransmitter. The known receptors are D1 to D5.

DP
Depersonalization (symptom)

DPD
Depersonalization Disorder

DP/DR-D
Depersonalization / Derealization Disorder (most common variant of the initialism)

DR
Derealization (symptom)

Drug-drug interaction
The usually unpleasant result of taking two or more medications that you shouldn’t take at the same time.
This also includes drug-food, drug-supplement, drug-coffee, tobacco, and alcohol are drugs, and drug-whatever I forgot interactions.

Most of the time this involves only PK, and often can be compensated for by increasing or decreasing the dosage of one of the drugs involved,
with Lamictal and Depakote or Tegretol being the best documented example.
While medications, etc. can change the actual effects of one another, that doesn’t happen anywhere near as often.

Drug-Drug Interaction
Drug-Drug Interactions
Drug-drug interaction
Drug-drug interactions
drug-drug interaction
drug-drug interactions
Drug-food interaction
Drug-food interactions
drug-food interaction
drug-food interactions
Drug-supplement interaction
Drug-supplement interactions
drug-supplement interaction
drug-supplement interactions
Drug-whatever interaction
Drug-whatever interactions
drug-whatever interaction
drug-whatever interactions

Drug Cocktail
When you’re taking at the very minimum three, but usually four or more different medications to treat one or more conditions, the combination is called a “drug cocktail,” or cocktail for short.
Drug cocktail
When you’re taking at the very minimum three, but usually four or more different medications to treat one or more conditions, the combination is called a “drug cocktail,” or cocktail for short.
drug cocktail
When you’re taking at the very minimum three, but usually four or more different medications to treat one or more conditions, the combination is called a “drug cocktail,” or cocktail for short.
drug cocktails
When you’re taking at the very minimum three, but usually four or more different medications to treat one or more conditions, the combination is called a “drug cocktail,” or cocktail for short.
Drug cocktails
When you’re taking at the very minimum three, but usually four or more different medications to treat one or more conditions, the combination is called a “drug cocktail,” or cocktail for short.
Drugs cocktail
When you’re taking at the very minimum three, but usually four or more different medications to treat one or more conditions, the combination is called a “drug cocktail,” or cocktail for short.
drugs cocktail
When you’re taking at the very minimum three, but usually four or more different medications to treat one or more conditions, the combination is called a “drug cocktail,” or cocktail for short.
Drugs cocktails
When you’re taking at the very minimum three, but usually four or more different medications to treat one or more conditions, the combination is called a “drug cocktail,” or cocktail for short.
drugs cocktails
When you’re taking at the very minimum three, but usually four or more different medications to treat one or more conditions, the combination is called a “drug cocktail,” or cocktail for short.

DSH
Deliberate Self Harm - British for Self Harm.

DSM-IV
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders - Fourth Edition
DSM-IV-TR
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision
DSM-5
The latest & greatest Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fifth Edition.
DSM-V
Obsolete nomenclature for DSM-5.
DSM
The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. The big-ass collection of billing codes doctors use to determine how to charge your insurance for whatever the hell is wrong with you.

Whenever used without a modifier like -IV or −5 it refers to the most current edition.
At least the most current edition your doctor is using.

Dx
Diagnosis. A neologism of sorts based on Rx.
Dyspepsia
Indigestion. Crazy meds most likely to cause this are the valproates, Abilify, and older AEDs like Felbatol (felbamate).
Dysphagia
Difficulty, even painful swallowing. This can be a potentially life-threatening side effect if it is bad enough, especially among the elderly. Either because they don’t complain about it and wind up choking on food, or people don’t take their complaints seriously, and they wind up choking on food.

Dysthymia
Chronic, mild-to-moderate depression. Something that shouldn’t require medication to fix unless nothing else works to make it go away. Cf. Euthymia, Major Depressive Disorder.
dysthymia
dysthymic
dysthymic
Dystonia
Prolonged, sometimes painful, muscle spasms/contractions in your neck, throat, and/or tongue.

ECT
Electro Convulsive Therapy (shock treatment). An overly-feared treatment for MDD that doesn’t respond to medication.

Also a frequent typo for etc.

ED
Eating Disorder or Erectile Dysfunction.

Also Emergency Department, which is used by the professionals and in The Literature instead of ER for Emergency Room.
Although why doctors et al. would rather use an initialism confused with Eating Disorder or Erectile Dysfunction is beyond me.10

EEG
Electroencephalogram. The read-out produced from electrodes pasted to your skull that attempt to measure the electrical activity of your brain.

E.g.
For example. From the Latin exempli gratia. This is where you have a couple of examples.11 Cf. I.e.
e.g.
{$:E.g.}
EG
{$:E.g.}
Eg
{$:E.g.}
E.G.
{$:E.g.}

Eli Lilly
Eli Lilly. One of the largest manufacturers of pharmaceuticals in the world.

Elimination Metabolism
The official name of the process that “clears” a drug from your body/system/whatever you call that lump of talking meat your soul lives in. Cf. Metabolize

For more information on elimination metabolism and the like, see the Page on Pharmacokinetics and Metabolism.

Elimination metabolism
{$:Elimination Metabolism}
elimination metabolism
{$:Elimination Metabolism}

EMA
European Medicines Agency. The UnAmerican New World Order European organization that is sort of a Commie version of their equivalent to the FDA, only less so. Unlike most EU bureaucracies, the EMA is trumped by local authorities. So if the EMA approves a med, but some country doesn’t like it, they can keep it out. Conversely, a med can be approved for sale in a couple of countries but available nowhere else. The EMA is also unlike any EU governing body in that a country doesn’t need to be a member of the EU to belong. Iceland, Norway, and Switzerland are members, and they wouldn’t be caught dead associating with the EU. See their website for indoctrination instructions more information.

Emotional Incontinence
When you’re on an emotional roller-coaster and swinging through various emotions (but not moods) for no good reason. One of the residents at the nursing home where I worked in 1980 had it, and it is frightening. As the elderly are especially susceptible to this, the term “incontinence” is unfortunately apt. Called pseudobulbar affect (PBA) in doctorese. Cf: Emotional lability.

Emotional Lability
If you find yourself crying over the fate of people in TV commercials, you’re probably dealing with one form of emotional lability. As both a side effect and a condition it has two meanings, but the second one isn’t used as much. The first is feeling way more than you should in a given situation. As in 12-year-old girls think you overreact to something they’re interested in.

The second is being on an emotional roller-coaster where you swing through various emotions (but not moods) for no good reason. This has been given a term of its own: Emotional incontinence, or pseudobulbar affect (PBA) in doctorese.

EPAR
Summary of Product Characteristics. Commie UnAmerican EU equivalent of Prescribing Information (PI) or SPCs. See this page on how to read our drug guides for a detailed translation and explanation of these particular initialisms & acronyms for more information.
EPARs
Summary of Product Characteristics. Commie UnAmerican EU equivalent of Prescribing Information (PI) or SPCs. See this page on how to read our drug guides for a detailed translation and explanation of these particular initialisms & acronyms for more information.

Episode
Doctorese euphemism for going batshit crazy or whatever your brain does to fuck you up.
episode
Doctorese euphemism for going batshit crazy or whatever your brain does to fuck you up.
episodes
Doctorese euphemism for going batshit crazy or whatever your brain does to fuck you up.
Episodes
Doctorese euphemism for going batshit crazy or whatever your brain does to fuck you up.

EPS
Extrapyramidal Symptoms, an uncommon, but really unpleasant movement-disorder side effect of APs. Cf. TD.

ER
Extended Release.

Also Emergency Room, but most people who work in one prefer Emergency Department (ED).
Although why doctors et al. would rather use an initialism confused with Eating Disorder or Erectile Dysfunction is beyond me.10

Et al.
And others. From the Latin et alia. This is a more polite version of etc. and is typically used for people.12
et al.
{$Et al.}
Et al
{$Et al.}
et al
{$Et al.}

EU
European Union. You know, all those Godless Commies with affordable health care who live in, along, or near the Northeastern Atlantic.

Euthymia
Happy. Technically neither depressed nor manic, but it also means not depersonalized, not having a blunted or flat affect, etc. In other words: normal. Which, like happy, isn’t a term anyone wants to use. So they use “euthymia,” because it’s the opposite of the legitimately used dysthymia.
euthymia
euthymic
Euthymic

FDA
Food and Drug Administration. The US government agency in charge of regulating and ensuring the quality and safety of food, drugs, cosmetics, tobacco, medical devices, and radiation-emitting consumer products such as cell phones.13

It’s a tough job balancing the protection of consumers with the need for Big Pharma and Big Farming to reap in rapacious profits pay for boardmembers’ solid gold toilets with bonuses 1,000 times larger than their workers make in a year give shareholders an ROI that Bernie Madoff would be proud of earn enough to research better products.
Still waiting for their apology to everyone whom they said was just imagining the problems they had with Teva’s Budeprion XL, or that it pooped-out on them.

FGA
First-Generation-Antipsychotic. The new term for a ‘standard’, ‘typical’, or ‘conventional antipsychotics such as Thorazine (chlorpromazine). Used primarily to distinguish them from the newer and more-prescribed SGAs.14

First-Generation Antipsychotic
The new term for a ‘standard’, ‘typical’, or ‘conventional antipsychotics such as Thorazine (chlorpromazine). Used primarily to distinguish them from the newer and more-prescribed SGAs.

They were developed prior to clozapine, and have a MOA that was essentially being a D2 antagonist, an antihistamine, and maybe an α1-adrenergic antagonist.
Turns out many of them do a lot more.

First-Generation Antipsychotic
First-Generation Antipsychotics
First-generation antipsychotic
First-generation antipsychotics
first-generation antipsychotic
first-generation antipsychotics
First-Generation antipsychotic
First-Generation antipsychotics

Formulary
The list of drugs insurance companies and HMOs will cover for each condition.15

Usually divided into tiers that are supposed to map to which ones to try first, and encourage your doctor to prescribe those first by making those meds more affordable.
Which drugs appear where, if at all, on formularies are determined by such things as profitability, fewest lawsuits, relationship between the pharmaceutical sales reps and the people who put the formularies together, and how well the meds work in terms of tens of thousands of people who take them instead of individuals who take them.

formulary
The list of drugs insurance companies and HMOs will cover for each condition.15
formularies
The list of drugs insurance companies and HMOs will cover for each condition.15
Formularies
The list of drugs insurance companies and HMOs will cover for each condition.15

Fora
Plural of forum.16
fora
Plural of forum.16
FP
Family Practitioner - What GPs are now called. Like a Primary Care Physician (PCP), but who likes to deal with kids, pregnant women, and the elderly as well as people who generally have fewer complications.
FPZ
fluphenazine. A potent FGA.

Freebase
The chemical base of a drug. The generic name of a drug is almost always the same as its base name, but the freebase is not necessarily the active ingredient.

If the drug’s active ingredient doesn’t have something like HCl, HBr, mesylate, or others, it’s the freebase. The exception being USP/U.S.P., which is the pharmaceutical equivalent of the Good Housekeeping Seal. And about as relevant.

freebase
The chemical base of a drug. The generic name of a drug is almost always the same as its base name, but the freebase is not necessarily the active ingredient.
free base
The chemical base of a drug. The generic name of a drug is almost always the same as its base name, but the freebase is not necessarily the active ingredient.
Free base
The chemical base of a drug. The generic name of a drug is almost always the same as its base name, but the freebase is not necessarily the active ingredient.
Free Base
The chemical base of a drug. The generic name of a drug is almost always the same as its base name, but the freebase is not necessarily the active ingredient.

Free Full Text
When an entire paper or article from a peer-reviewed journal is available to read online without charge.
free full text
free full-text
Free full text
Free full-text
Free Full Text
Free Full-Text

GABA
The neurotransmitter Gamma-AminoButyric Acid. Probably everybody’s second-favorite neurotransmitter after dopamine.
For more on neurotransmitters, receptors and the like, see the page on Pharmacodynamics.

GAD
Generalized Anxiety Disorder. Part of the alphabet soup of Anxiety Spectrum Disorders

GP
General Practitioner (regular doctor) - replaced by Family Practitioner (FP) or, if you don’t have kids, and aren’t especially old, the Primary Care Physician (PCP).
Obsolete abbreviation of gabapentin.

GPs
General Practitioners (regular doctors) - replaced by Family Practitioner (FP) or, if you don’t have kids, and aren’t especially old, the Primary Care Physician (PCP).

GBP
gabapentin. Generic for Neurontin

GSK
GlaxoSmithKline. The world’s sixth-largest (for now) pharmaceuticals company.
They make Lamictal, Paxil, Wellbutrin (but not Wellbutrin XL) & Zyban, Imitrex, Requip, Lovaza, and about 100 non-crazy meds.

H/O
History Of.

H1
Histamine receptor one. This is the target for Benadryl, Zyprexa, Seroquel, Remeron, trazodone, and most other crazy meds that knock you out and/or make you want to eat everything in sight.
For more on neurotransmitters, receptors and the like, see the page on Pharmacodynamics.
H2
Histamine receptor two.
H3
Histamine receptor three.

HAL
haloperidol Generic for Haldol.

HBr
Hydrobromide. The second-most-commonly used (among crazy meds) chemical salt of a freebase drug, produced when hydrobromic acid is reacted (mixed) with the freebase. Cf. HCl
HBR
Hydrobromide. The second-most-commonly used (among crazy meds) chemical salt of a freebase drug, produced when hydrobromic acid is reacted (mixed) with the freebase. Cf. HCl
Hydrobromide
Hydrobromide. The second-most-commonly used (among crazy meds) chemical salt of a freebase drug, produced when hydrobromic acid is reacted (mixed) with the freebase. Cf. HCl
hydrobromide
Hydrobromide. The second-most-commonly used (among crazy meds) chemical salt of a freebase drug, produced when hydrobromic acid is reacted (mixed) with the freebase. Cf. HCl

HCl
Hydrochloride. The most-commonly used (among crazy meds) chemical salt of a freebase drug, produced when hydrochloric acid is reacted (mixed) with the freebase. Cf. HBr
HCL
Hydrochloride. The most-commonly used (among crazy meds) chemical salt of a freebase drug, produced when hydrochloric acid is reacted (mixed) with the freebase. Cf. HBr
Hydrochloride
Hydrochloride. The most-commonly used (among crazy meds) chemical salt of a freebase drug, produced when hydrochloric acid is reacted (mixed) with the freebase. Cf. HBr
hydrochloride
Hydrochloride. The most-commonly used (among crazy meds) chemical salt of a freebase drug, produced when hydrochloric acid is reacted (mixed) with the freebase. Cf. HBr

Hep
Hepatitis. Available in types A through E. Perhaps F and G as well. Maybe even more.

HMO
Health Maintenance Organization. Where all of your doctors and others in the medical bureaucracy work for the same company,
and you go to one large building or campus of buildings to deal with all of your medical crap, including your prescriptions.
If you don’t like what they have you can drive to the nearest town with that HMO and try your luck there, or pay full retail for the services of a private doctor, pharmacy, etc.
Good luck getting some of your money reimbursed by the HMO, which is theoretically possible. The only thing worse than HMO is PPO.

h.s.
at bedtime. From the Latinhora somni, the hour of sleep. Cf. q.h.s.
HS
{$:h.s.}

Hx
History. A neologism of sorts based on Rx.
Hypomenorrhea
Unusually light and short periods. While practically every crazy med has this listed as a potential side effect, only women for whom this is not good thing will get it.
Hypersomnolence
Seriously sleepy. As in you sleep for over 12 hours a day and you cannot wake up before you get your 12 hours’ worth of sleep.

IBS
Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

Idiopathic
Describes a condition that begins out of nowhere with no obvious reason. The most common guess is genetic, but no one is really sure as to what the cause is.
idiopathic
Describes a condition that begins out of nowhere with no obvious reason. The most common guess is genetic, but no one is really sure as to what the cause is.

I.e.
That is. From the Latin id est, literally “that is.” Used when rephrasing something, NOT giving a list of examples. Cf. E.g.17
i.e.
{$:I.e.}
ie.
{$:I.e.}
Ie.
{$:I.e.}
IE.
{$:I.e.}

IM
Intramuscular - a type of injection that happens in your shoulder, hip, or other convenient muscle. It is the preferred injection method for most injected crazy meds.

Indication
What a med can be used for. Technically an indication is the official, FDA-approved use. Some indications can be incredibly specific, such as Lamictal’s.
indication
What a med can be used for. Technically an indication is the official, FDA-approved use. Some indications can be incredibly specific, such as Lamictal’s.
Indications
What a med can be used for. Technically an indication is the official, FDA-approved use. Some indications can be incredibly specific, such as Lamictal’s.
indications
What a med can be used for. Technically an indication is the official, FDA-approved use. Some indications can be incredibly specific, such as Lamictal’s.

International Nonproprietary Name
Commie Metric New World Order World Health Organization’s version of a standardized, One True Generic Name that everyone says they’re using but aren’t. Because if everyone did use a One True Generic Name, I wouldn’t need to have written the following on the Effexor Page -
  • venlafaksin - Bosnian, Croatian, Norwegian, Serbian, Slovenian, Turkish
  • venlafaksiin - Estonian
  • venlafaksiini - Finnish
  • venlafaxin - German, Swedish, Vietnamese
  • venlafaxina - Italian, Portuguese, Spanish
  • venlafaxinum - Latin
  • venlafaksino - Lithuanian
  • venlafaxină - Romanian
  • الفينلافاكسين - Arabic transliteration of venlafaxine
  • 文拉法辛 - Chinese transliteration of venlafaxine
  • венлафаксин - Cyrillic transliteration of venlafaxine
  • Βενλαφαξίνη - Greek transliteration of Venlafaxine
  • ונלפאקסין - Hebrew transliteration of venlafaxine
  • 벤라팍신 - Korean transliteration of venlafaxine

I’ve also seen venlafaxini hydrochloridum as the active ingredient of some central- and eastern-European generics. I don’t know enough (i.e. anything) about Latin to know if that is even correct usage or not. Let alone if venlafaxinum is correct. Latin generic names are all bullshit as far as I’m concerned.

Transliterations into non-Latin alphabets I can understand, but, really German, WTF? For a language that gives us words too long to use on two adjacent Scrabble boards, you need to drop a letter? And are Latin names for the generic names (most, if not all, have one) really necessary? Why the hell is using the Latin name so popular in east Europe anyway?
Cf. Trade Name.

international nonproprietary name
{$:International Nonproprietary Name}
International nonproprietary name
{$:International Nonproprietary Name}
International Nonproprietary Name
{$:International Nonproprietary Name}
INN
INNs

IP
In-Patient. When you’re being treated for your brain cooties in the hospital.

J&J
Johnson & Johnson. The parent company of Ortho McNeil Janssen Hunger Force Rainbow Neurologics

Jamais Vu
The sensation of something familiar being out of place or otherwise different.
One time I was sure the satellite dish had moved from the west side of my house to the east side. More recently a free-standing faucet seemed to have migrated from one side of the carport to the other.
Frequent instances of jamais vu can be a side effect of AEDs as well as a symptom of epilepsy or something else that causes too much activity in your left temporal lobe and/or too little activity in your right temporal lobe. From the French for “never seen.” Cf. Déjà vu.
Jamais vu
{$:Jamais Vu}
jamais vu
{$:Jamais Vu}

Ketogenic Diet
a way of controlling epilepsy through what you eat. It can actually work, but for various reasons it works best if started in childhood.

A gross oversimplification is in it’s most extreme form- all your kid gets to eat is meat and eggs. You want desert? Have some bacon18.
Often shortened to keto diet, or just keto. Cf. Modified Atkins

Ketogenic Diet
Keto
Keto Diet
Ketogenic
ketogenic diet
keto
keto diet
ketogenic
Ketogenic diet
Keto diet

Label
For most things it’s what the ingredients are supposed to be. With meds it’s FDA’s prescription-strength version of a drug’s prescribing information (PI). The Label contains not just the PI, but the New Drug Approval (NDA) information19. It also has vague legal powers, which is why drug companies can get their asses handed to them if their sales reps get caught pushing meds for off-label uses.
label
For most things it’s what the ingredients are supposed to be. With meds it’s FDA’s prescription-strength version of a drug’s prescribing information (PI). The Label contains not just the PI, but the New Drug Approval (NDA) information19. It also has vague legal powers, which is why drug companies can get their asses handed to them if their sales reps get caught pushing meds for off-label uses.
Leukopenia
A blood dyscrasia.

LEV
levetiracetam Generic for Keppra

Li
Lithium. Li is actually elemental lithium, but it’s what everyone calls the medicines lithium carbonate and the lesser-used lithium citrate.

Li2CO3
What lithium carbonate really is.

Lilly
Eli Lilly. One of the largest manufacturers of pharmaceuticals in the world.

They are the makers of Prozac, Zyprexa, Symbyax, Strattera, Cymbalta, and non-crazy meds like insulin and Cialis.

Literature
Shorthand for all the stuff you can find on PubMed, Google Scholar, actual books, and so forth. See this site’s general bibliography for an idea. When it comes to articles published in peer-reviewed journals20, there is a hierarchy of credibility / importance when it comes to the value of what was studied21. Except for letters they all follow the same general format22 In ascending order they are:
  • Letter (AKA lazy case report) - A doctor writes to a journal to tell them about this patient they had that you would not believe.
  • Case Report - A well-documented account of a doctor’s patient(s) that was just un-fucking-believable.
  • Meta-Analysis23 - Someone gets grant money to have a grad student go through all of The Literature looking for studies, etc. to support the original claim.
  • Open-Label Study - Anywhere from 5 to 10, rarely more than 20, patients at a hospital, clinic, etc. are given a drug and everyone knows what the drug is and why people are taking it.
  • Review24 - A less-formal meta-analysis written by someone who needed to keep their name in print (publish or perish), fill space in their journal, drug company money, or all of the above.
  • Single-Blind Study - Typically the same size as open-label, only the people taking the pills don’t know if it’s the med being tested or a placebo25.
  • Double-Blind Study - Neither the people administering the pills nor the people taking them know which is the real thing and which is the placebo. Most have over 20 participants, but you need at least 20 in each group to make it worth the effort.
    • A med passing a double-blind study is the bare minimum for me to suggest talking to your doctor about an off-label prescription if the regular stuff isn’t working for you.
    • Anything with only less than this (single-blind, open-label, case report) should be reserved for when you’re running out of options.
  • Clinical Trial - A super-sized double-blind study. At least a hundred people in each group, all of whom had to meet very specific criteria to participate.
  • Multicenter Clinical Trial - The same clinical trial taking place in several locations at the same time, often in different countries.
  • Longitudinal Study - After a lot of double-blind studies and clinical trials they track the people who were taking the med being studied for a year or so. That’s just part of a really good study or trial. A longitudinal study is when they track a group of people who were in one of those, or who just take a med, for several years. Or longer. And it’s not always meds. If you’re familiar with the Up series of movies you know about one of the longest longitudinal studies on record.

The number of participants in the studies and trials, how long they lasted, inclusion & exclusion criteria, who paid for it, and other parameters determine whose study or trial is better than whose.
As for books, it comes down to a pissing match between the authors and their individual research, publishing, and actual medical practice histories.

Finding and Reading The Literature is as much of an art as the research itself. Here are a few peer-reviewed tips:

For more information see: the Crazymeds Guide to Evaluating Research Papers, and Tips on Finding Research Papers.

The Literature
Shorthand for all the stuff you can find on PubMed, Google Scholar, actual books, and so forth. See this site’s general bibliography for an idea. When it comes to articles published in peer-reviewed journals20, there is a hierarchy of credibility / importance when it comes to the value of what was studied21. Except for letters they all follow the same general format22 In ascending order they are:
the Literature
Shorthand for all the stuff you can find on PubMed, Google Scholar, actual books, and so forth. See this site’s general bibliography for an idea. When it comes to articles published in peer-reviewed journals20, there is a hierarchy of credibility / importance when it comes to the value of what was studied21. Except for letters they all follow the same general format22 In ascending order they are:
the literature
Shorthand for all the stuff you can find on PubMed, Google Scholar, actual books, and so forth. See this site’s general bibliography for an idea. When it comes to articles published in peer-reviewed journals20, there is a hierarchy of credibility / importance when it comes to the value of what was studied21. Except for letters they all follow the same general format22 In ascending order they are:

LTG
lamotrigine Generic for Lamictal

M1
Muscarinic receptor one. Pretty much the only one of the five you’ll read about.
For more on neurotransmitters, receptors and the like, see the page on Pharmacodynamics.
M2
Muscarinic receptor two.
M3
Muscarinic receptor three. Like M1, but even less so.
M5
Muscarinic receptor four.
M5
Muscarinic receptor five.

MAO
Monoamine Oxidase. A brain juice that breaks down monoamine neurotransmitters, such as serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine, e.g.
For more on neurotransmitters, receptors and the like, see the page on Pharmacodynamics.

MAOI
Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitor - the first modern ADs. They slow the breakdown of monoamine neurotransmitters by MAO.
MAOIs
Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors - the first modern ADs. They slow the breakdown of monoamine neurotransmitters by MAO.

mcg
microgram. Also μg.

MDD
Major Depressive Disorder.

Mechanism of action
Mechanism/method of action, is what a drug does to treat whatever you have. With crazy meds this is often usually almost always a guess that is subject to change.
mechanisms of action
Mechanism/method of action, is what a drug does to treat whatever you have. With crazy meds this is often usually almost always a guess that is subject to change.
mechanism of action
Mechanism/method of action, is what a drug does to treat whatever you have. With crazy meds this is often usually almost always a guess that is subject to change.
Mechanisms of action
Mechanism/method of action, is what a drug does to treat whatever you have. With crazy meds this is often usually almost always a guess that is subject to change.
Mechanisms of Action
Mechanism/method of action, is what a drug does to treat whatever you have. With crazy meds this is often usually almost always a guess that is subject to change.
Mechanism of Action
Mechanism/method of action, is what a drug does to treat whatever you have. With crazy meds this is often usually almost always a guess that is subject to change.

Med
Medication, Medicine, or Medical. “Med” is an abbreviation for a shitload of things, but on this site it almost always means “Medication” or “Medicine.”
Meds
Medication, Medicine, or Medical. “Med” is an abbreviation for a shitload of things, but on this site it almost always means “Medication” or “Medicine.”
med
Medication, Medicine, or Medical. “Med” is an abbreviation for a shitload of things, but on this site it almost always means “Medication” or “Medicine.”
meds
Medication, Medicine, or Medical. “Med” is an abbreviation for a shitload of things, but on this site it almost always means “Medication” or “Medicine.”

Med-Go-Round
Term coined at bipolar.about.com to describe the process of trying one fucking med after another because:
  • They don’t work.
  • They stop working.
  • The side effects were much worse than the condition they were treating.
  • No one makes the damn things anymore.

Usually prepended with “riding” (in the appropriate tense), and sometimes “a lot of horsies”.26

Med Go Round
Term coined at bipolar.about.com to describe the process of trying one fucking med after another because:
Med go round
Term coined at bipolar.about.com to describe the process of trying one fucking med after another because:
med go round
Term coined at bipolar.about.com to describe the process of trying one fucking med after another because:
Med-go-round
Term coined at bipolar.about.com to describe the process of trying one fucking med after another because:
med-go-round
Term coined at bipolar.about.com to describe the process of trying one fucking med after another because:
Menorrhagia
Bleeding like a stuck pig during your period.

Mentally Interesting
Dr. Oliver Sacks’ term for people whose brains aren’t standard issue. Our use of it is about as close to being politically correct as we get here. Cf. Brain Cooties, Person First Language
Mentally interesting
{$:Mentally Interesting}
mentally interesting
{$:Mentally Interesting}

Mesylate
A chemical salt or ester of a freebase drug, produced when methanesulfonic acid is reacted (mixed) with the freebase. Cf. HBr HCl
mesylate
A chemical salt or ester of a freebase drug, produced when methanesulfonic acid is reacted (mixed) with the freebase. Cf. HBr HCl

Method of action
Mechanism/method of action, is what a drug does to treat whatever you have. With crazy meds this is often usually almost always a guess that is subject to change.
method of action
Mechanism/method of action, is what a drug does to treat whatever you have. With crazy meds this is often usually almost always a guess that is subject to change.
methods of action
Mechanism/method of action, is what a drug does to treat whatever you have. With crazy meds this is often usually almost always a guess that is subject to change.
Methods of action
Mechanism/method of action, is what a drug does to treat whatever you have. With crazy meds this is often usually almost always a guess that is subject to change.
Methods of Action
Mechanism/method of action, is what a drug does to treat whatever you have. With crazy meds this is often usually almost always a guess that is subject to change.
Method of Action
Mechanism/method of action, is what a drug does to treat whatever you have. With crazy meds this is often usually almost always a guess that is subject to change.

Metabolite
What is sometimes the result of a drug being metabolized. Some metabolites are “active,” which means they do something. Cf. Active metabolite.
For more information on metabolization and the like, see the Page on Pharmacokinetics and Metabolism
metabolite
What is sometimes the result of a drug being metabolized. Some metabolites are “active,” which means they do something. Cf. Active metabolite.
For more information on metabolization and the like, see the Page on Pharmacokinetics and Metabolism
metabolites
Metabolites

Metabolize
To change a drug from one substance into another. On consumer-oriented sites “metabolize” refers to the entire process of getting rid of a med after it’s done its job.
Many meds need to be metabolized into something else - called an “active metabolite” - in order to actually do something. So when you take Risperdal (risperidone) or Effexor (venlafaxine), what’s in the pill is a prodrug that needs to be transformed into its active metabolite in order to work.
Metabolism (the process) is just one part of the process needed for you to piss and/or shit away the remnants of any drug (or whatever). Cf.
For more information on metabolization and the like, see the Page on Pharmacokinetics and Metabolism
metabolize
To change a drug from one substance into another. On consumer-oriented sites “metabolize” refers to the entire process of getting rid of a med after it’s done its job.
Many meds need to be metabolized into something else - called an “active metabolite” - in order to actually do something. So when you take Risperdal (risperidone) or Effexor (venlafaxine), what’s in the pill is a prodrug that needs to be transformed into its active metabolite in order to work.
Metabolism (the process) is just one part of the process needed for you to piss and/or shit away the remnants of any drug (or whatever). Cf.
For more information on metabolization and the like, see the Page on Pharmacokinetics and Metabolism
metabolizes
To change a drug from one substance into another. On consumer-oriented sites “metabolize” refers to the entire process of getting rid of a med after it’s done its job.
Many meds need to be metabolized into something else - called an “active metabolite” - in order to actually do something. So when you take Risperdal (risperidone) or Effexor (venlafaxine), what’s in the pill is a prodrug that needs to be transformed into its active metabolite in order to work.
Metabolism (the process) is just one part of the process needed for you to piss and/or shit away the remnants of any drug (or whatever). Cf.
For more information on metabolization and the like, see the Page on Pharmacokinetics and Metabolism
metabolized
To change a drug from one substance into another. On consumer-oriented sites “metabolize” refers to the entire process of getting rid of a med after it’s done its job.
Many meds need to be metabolized into something else - called an “active metabolite” - in order to actually do something. So when you take Risperdal (risperidone) or Effexor (venlafaxine), what’s in the pill is a prodrug that needs to be transformed into its active metabolite in order to work.
Metabolism (the process) is just one part of the process needed for you to piss and/or shit away the remnants of any drug (or whatever). Cf.
For more information on metabolization and the like, see the Page on Pharmacokinetics and Metabolism
metabolizing
To change a drug from one substance into another. On consumer-oriented sites “metabolize” refers to the entire process of getting rid of a med after it’s done its job.
Many meds need to be metabolized into something else - called an “active metabolite” - in order to actually do something. So when you take Risperdal (risperidone) or Effexor (venlafaxine), what’s in the pill is a prodrug that needs to be transformed into its active metabolite in order to work.
Metabolism (the process) is just one part of the process needed for you to piss and/or shit away the remnants of any drug (or whatever). Cf.
For more information on metabolization and the like, see the Page on Pharmacokinetics and Metabolism
metabolization
To change a drug from one substance into another. On consumer-oriented sites “metabolize” refers to the entire process of getting rid of a med after it’s done its job.
Many meds need to be metabolized into something else - called an “active metabolite” - in order to actually do something. So when you take Risperdal (risperidone) or Effexor (venlafaxine), what’s in the pill is a prodrug that needs to be transformed into its active metabolite in order to work.
Metabolism (the process) is just one part of the process needed for you to piss and/or shit away the remnants of any drug (or whatever). Cf.
For more information on metabolization and the like, see the Page on Pharmacokinetics and Metabolism
Metabolizes
To change a drug from one substance into another. On consumer-oriented sites “metabolize” refers to the entire process of getting rid of a med after it’s done its job.
Many meds need to be metabolized into something else - called an “active metabolite” - in order to actually do something. So when you take Risperdal (risperidone) or Effexor (venlafaxine), what’s in the pill is a prodrug that needs to be transformed into its active metabolite in order to work.
Metabolism (the process) is just one part of the process needed for you to piss and/or shit away the remnants of any drug (or whatever). Cf.
For more information on metabolization and the like, see the Page on Pharmacokinetics and Metabolism
Metabolized
To change a drug from one substance into another. On consumer-oriented sites “metabolize” refers to the entire process of getting rid of a med after it’s done its job.
Many meds need to be metabolized into something else - called an “active metabolite” - in order to actually do something. So when you take Risperdal (risperidone) or Effexor (venlafaxine), what’s in the pill is a prodrug that needs to be transformed into its active metabolite in order to work.
Metabolism (the process) is just one part of the process needed for you to piss and/or shit away the remnants of any drug (or whatever). Cf.
For more information on metabolization and the like, see the Page on Pharmacokinetics and Metabolism
Metabolizing
To change a drug from one substance into another. On consumer-oriented sites “metabolize” refers to the entire process of getting rid of a med after it’s done its job.
Many meds need to be metabolized into something else - called an “active metabolite” - in order to actually do something. So when you take Risperdal (risperidone) or Effexor (venlafaxine), what’s in the pill is a prodrug that needs to be transformed into its active metabolite in order to work.
Metabolism (the process) is just one part of the process needed for you to piss and/or shit away the remnants of any drug (or whatever). Cf.
For more information on metabolization and the like, see the Page on Pharmacokinetics and Metabolism
Metabolization
To change a drug from one substance into another. On consumer-oriented sites “metabolize” refers to the entire process of getting rid of a med after it’s done its job.
Many meds need to be metabolized into something else - called an “active metabolite” - in order to actually do something. So when you take Risperdal (risperidone) or Effexor (venlafaxine), what’s in the pill is a prodrug that needs to be transformed into its active metabolite in order to work.
Metabolism (the process) is just one part of the process needed for you to piss and/or shit away the remnants of any drug (or whatever). Cf.
For more information on metabolization and the like, see the Page on Pharmacokinetics and Metabolism
Metrorrhagia
Irregular periods. Generally it means happening more often, but it’s a catch-all term for your cycle being off.

mg
milligram

MI
Mental Illness / Mentally Interesting / Mentally Ill

Migraineur
Someone afflicted with migraines.
migraineur
Someone afflicted with migraines.
migraineurs
Someone afflicted with migraines.
Migraineurs
Someone afflicted with migraines.
mL
milliliter

MOA
Mechanism/method of action, is what a drug does to treat whatever you have. With crazy meds this is often usually almost always a guess that is subject to change.

When someone says, “An SSRI works by increasing the amount of serotonin in your brain.” that is 1) not exactly what they do and 2) may or may not be the reason they are effective in treating depression and anxiety.
Cf. Pharmacodynamics.

Modified Atkins
A less severe form of the ketogenic diet, used mainly by adults who have been eating keto since they were kids to help control epilepsy.
Modified Atkins
modified Atkins

Mood Stabilizer
A drug used to treat bipolar disorder. While most mood stabilizers are antipsychotics, on bipolar sties the term is usually reserved for antiepileptic drugs.

You’d think it would be a drug that actually makes you stable by working on both mania and depression, but for the most part “mood stabilizer” means “a drug used to treat the manic phase of bipolar disorder.”
It’s pure marketing, since most people with bipolar disorder like the manic phase, why the hell would we take an antimanic?
See the page on Mood Stabilizers for more information.

Mood Stabilizer
{$:Mood Stabilizer}
Mood stabilizer
{$:Mood Stabilizer}
mood stabilizer
{$:Mood Stabilizer}
Mood Stabilizers
{$:Mood Stabilizer}
Mood stabilizers
{$:Mood Stabilizer}
mood stabilizers
{$:Mood Stabilizer}

MPD
Multiple Personality Disorder - the old name for Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID)

MRI
Magnetic Resonance Imagery - where you get to lie in a loud tube for hours as huge, powerful magnets take hundreds of grainy pictures of your brain.
MRIs
Magnetic Resonance Imagery - where you get to lie in a loud tube for hours as huge, powerful magnets take hundreds of grainy pictures of your brain.

MS
Mood Stabilizer, Multiple Sclerosis and others.

Muscarinic Receptor
One of the Acetylcholine (ACh) receptors. The primary target of anticholinergic drugs. Its receptors are M1 through M5.
For more on neurotransmitters, receptors and the like, see the page on Pharmacodynamics.
Muscarinic Receptor
Muscarinic receptor
muscarinic receptor
Muscarinic Receptors
Muscarinic receptors
muscarinic receptors

N1
Nicotinic receptor 1.
N2
Nicotinic receptor 2.

NA
The neurotransmitters Nicotinic Acid and noradrenaline (AKA norepinephrine). Nicotinic acid is what we mean when using NA, and norepinephrine is the name we use for that particular brain juice.
For more on neurotransmitters, receptors and the like, see the page on Pharmacodynamics.

NE
The neurotransmitter norepinephrine (AKA noradrenaline). The receptors most often dealt with are the α1- and α2-adrenergic, and β1- and β2-adrenergic.

For more on neurotransmitters, receptors and the like, see the page on Pharmacodynamics.

Norepinephrine
The neurotransmitter norepinephrine (AKA noradrenaline). The receptors most often dealt with are the α1- and α2-adrenergic, and β1- and β2-adrenergic.
norepinephrine
The neurotransmitter norepinephrine (AKA noradrenaline). The receptors most often dealt with are the α1- and α2-adrenergic, and β1- and β2-adrenergic.
Norepinephrine/Noradrenaline
The neurotransmitter norepinephrine (AKA noradrenaline). The receptors most often dealt with are the α1- and α2-adrenergic, and β1- and β2-adrenergic.
Norepinephrine/noradrenaline
The neurotransmitter norepinephrine (AKA noradrenaline). The receptors most often dealt with are the α1- and α2-adrenergic, and β1- and β2-adrenergic.
norepinephrine/noradrenaline
The neurotransmitter norepinephrine (AKA noradrenaline). The receptors most often dealt with are the α1- and α2-adrenergic, and β1- and β2-adrenergic.

Neologism
In psychiatry neologism is used when someone assigns meanings to words that are different from those everyone else uses, or creates new words to use in place of existing words for something.

It’s a fairly common symptom of delusional behavior exhibited in the schizophrenic and bipolar. Examples are Humpty Dumpty in Alice in Wonderland, the innovators of management jargon, and people desperate to come across as 1337 h4×0rs.
In linguists it means a new word or term for one thing based on an existing word or term for something else.

neologism
neologisms

NET
Norepinephrine transporter.

Neurotransmitter
A brain juice that plays a key role in how neurons and other cells send information to each other.
For more on neurotransmitters, receptors and the like, see the page on Pharmacodynamics.
neurotransmitter
A brain juice that plays a key role in how neurons and other cells send information to each other.
For more on neurotransmitters, receptors and the like, see the page on Pharmacodynamics.
neurotransmitters
A brain juice that plays a key role in how neurons and other cells send information to each other.
For more on neurotransmitters, receptors and the like, see the page on Pharmacodynamics.
Neurotransmitters
A brain juice that plays a key role in how neurons and other cells send information to each other.
For more on neurotransmitters, receptors and the like, see the page on Pharmacodynamics.
Neutropenia
A blood dyscrasia.

Nicotinic Receptor
One of the Acetylcholine (ACh) receptors with numerous subtypes(at least α1–α9 and β1–β4) of N1 and N2. Give you one guess which drug likes these.
Nicotinic Receptor
{$:Nicotinic Receptor}
Nicotinic Receptors
{$:Nicotinic Receptor}
Nicotinic receptor
{$:Nicotinic Receptor}
Nicotinic receptors
{$:Nicotinic Receptor}
nicotinic receptor
{$:Nicotinic Receptor}
nicotinic receptors
{$:Nicotinic Receptor}

NLD
Non-verbal Learning Disorder/Disability/Difference. NVLD is used more often.

Noradrenaline
Alternative, and older, name for norepinephrine.
noradrenaline

NOS
Not Otherwise Specified. I.e. not fitting neatly into a defined category and/or doctors don’t have a clue about why you don’t react to treatment normally.

NRI
Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitor. Replaced by NSRI.

NSAID
Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug. Aspirin, ibuprofen, etc.

NSFW
Not Safe For Work. Content on a NSFW page contains something you would probably not want to show your boss, teacher, mother, spouse, spiritual adviser, or similar authority figure.

NSRI
Norepinephrine-Selective Reuptake Inhibitor. Thanks to Dr. Preskorn for his elegant solution to the initialism conflict. Cf. SSRI and SNRI.

NT
Neurotypical (non-autistic, “normal” people)

NVLD
Non-Verbal Learning Disorder/Disability/Difference. NLD is also used. This is expected to be rolled into the umbrella ASD diagnosis in DSM-5.
Nystagmus
Involuntary eye movements that don’t involve tracking good-looking people and/or food you can no longer eat.

OCD
Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. Part of the alphabet soup of Anxiety Spectrum Disorders

OCPD
Obsessive-compulsive personality disorder

ODD
Oppositional Defiant Disorder

Off-Label
Prescribing or using a drug for a condition (indication) for which it does not have official FDA approval to treat. The term comes the FDA’s label, which is essentially the prescribing information, but with vague legal aspects.
off-label
Off-Label
off label
Off Label

OLZ
olanzapine Generic for Zyprexa

OrthoMcNeilJanssenHungerForceRainbowNeurologics
Whatever the J&J subsidiary or subsidiaries that manufacture Topamax, Risperdal and Invega are being called these days.

I don’t know what is up with them, but they are constantly restructuring their crazy meds division.
Sometimes one company makes all three drugs. Sometimes one company with OrthoMcNeil in its name makes Topamax, and another company with Janssen in its name makes Risperdal and Invega.
Sometimes those companies make other drugs, and when they don’t “Neurologics” (or something like that) is often in the name.
“Hunger Force Rainbow”, and other random-seeming words, have two main sources.
The first refers to the Adult Swim program Aqua Teen Hunger Force that has had three (to date) name changes.
The second is Caroliner, a band from San Francisco whose name changed with every show and record. In the 1980s and 1990s the pattern was Caroliner Rainbow [two or more random words].
Anything else refers to something or someone with frequent name changes.

OMJHF
Whatever the J&J subsidiary or subsidiaries that manufacture Topamax, Risperdal and Invega are being called these days.
OrthoMcNeil Caroliner Rainbow Neurologics
Whatever the J&J subsidiary or subsidiaries that manufacture Topamax, Risperdal and Invega are being called these days.
OrthoMcNeil Janssen Hunger Force
Whatever the J&J subsidiary or subsidiaries that manufacture Topamax, Risperdal and Invega are being called these days.
OrthoMcNeil MS-Passport
Whatever the J&J subsidiary or subsidiaries that manufacture Topamax, Risperdal and Invega are being called these days.
OrthoMcNeilJanssenFoetusInterruptus
Whatever the J&J subsidiary or subsidiaries that manufacture Topamax, Risperdal and Invega are being called these days.
OrthoMcNeil Janssen Foetus Interruptus
Whatever the J&J subsidiary or subsidiaries that manufacture Topamax, Risperdal and Invega are being called these days.
OrthoMcNeil P-Diddy Janssen
Whatever the J&J subsidiary or subsidiaries that manufacture Topamax, Risperdal and Invega are being called these days.

Orthostatic Hypotension
Dangerously low blood pressure. If you’ve ever felt dizzy or light-headed immediately after standing up you have a mild case of orthostatic hypotension. If you faint (lose consciousness, syncope) when you stand up, you need to see your doctor right away. Orthostatic hypotension is a side effect of many crazy meds, especially antipsychotics and antiepileptic drugs.
orthostatic hypotension
{$:Orthostatic Hypotension}
Orthostatic hypotension
{$:Orthostatic Hypotension}

OT
Occupational Therapist

OTC
Over The Counter - medicine you can buy without a prescription.

OXC
oxcarbazepine Generic for Trileptal

Package Insert
What prescribing information is called in South Africa and by the FDA.
package insert
{$:Package Insert}
Package insert
{$:Package Insert}
package inserts
{$:Package Insert}
Package Inserts
{$:Package Insert}
Paresthesia
The official name for that “pins and needles”, foot/leg/arm “fell asleep”, tingling sensation you get when (among other reasons) you restrict the circulation to one of your limbs then suddenly let the blood flow back all at once. This ranges from mildly annoying to very painful. Almost everyone who takes Topamax experiences it at least once during the first two weeks.

Patent Extender
When a drug company gets approval from the FDA for a completely new use for (such as rebranding Prozac for PMDD under the name Sarafem),

or it makes a small change (usually rolling out a CR/ER/XR version) to a drug that is just about to go generic in order to create a “new” product
and prevent other companies from getting FDA approval to make their own generic versions.
One thing that really sucks is how extended-release forms can be very helpful for a lot of people, but are frequently held back in order to enhance Big Pharma’s bottom line.

Patent Extenders
{$:Patent Extender}
Patent extender
{$:Patent Extender}
Patent extenders
{$:Patent Extender}
patent extender
{$:Patent Extender}
patent extenders
{$:Patent Extender}

Patient Information Leaflet
(PIL) A shorter version of the prescribing information (PI) with less doctorese. PILs, along with the PI, are copied word-for-word by sites like WebMd and all the sites they own (eMedicineHealth, RxList, Medscape, MedicineNet), MedLine Plus, DailyMed, and anywhere that offers “FDA-approved” information, like NAMBLA.org NAMI.org, displayed in different formats from the ones that appear on the drug’s owner’s27 site, and sold to consumers as something special. On some sites either or both of the PILs and PI is most, if not all, of the information they provide about a medication.28
Patient Information Leaflets
{$:Patient Information Leaflet}
Patient information leaflet
{$:Patient Information Leaflet}
patient information leaflet
{$:Patient Information Leaflet}
Patient Information Leaflets
{$:Patient Information Leaflet}
Patient information leaflets
{$:Patient Information Leaflet}
patient information leaflets
{$:Patient Information Leaflet}

Patient Information Literature
(PIL) A shorter version of the prescribing information (PI) with less doctorese. The PIL, along with the PI, is copied word-for-word by sites like WebMd and all the sites they own (eMedicineHealth, RxList, Medscape, MedicineNet), MedLine Plus, DailyMed, and anywhere that offers “FDA-approved” information, like NAMBLA.org NAMI.org, displayed in different formats from the ones that appear on the drug’s owner’s27 site, and sold to consumers as something special. On some sites either or both of the PIL and PI is most, if not all, of the information they provide about a medication.28
Patient information literature
{$:Patient Information Literature}
patient information literature
{$:Patient Information Literature}

p.c.
after eating/meals. From the Latin post cibum, for after food.

PCP
These days it usually means Primary Care Physician (AKA GP/General Practitioner). Once upon a time it was usually used as the abbreviation for phencyclidine (AKA angel dust).

PD
Panic Disorder. Part of the alphabet soup of Anxiety Spectrum Disorders. Also:

Pharmacodynamics What a drug does and how it does it. This is mostly, but not entirely concerned with its mechanism of action - what it does to treat whatever condition you have.
A drug’s PD can be simple, like Lexapro’s, or it can be complex, like Zonegran or Saphris, which can best be summed up as “What do Zonegran and Saphris not do?”

PDD
Pervasive Developmental Disorder/Difference. AKA Autism lite or Autism for parents who can’t deal with the stigma of Autism. PDD has been rolled into the all-encompassing ASD diagnosis in the DSM-5.

Pdoc
Psychiatrist

PDR
Physicians Desk Reference That big-ass book of PI sheets that most doctors have but too few refer to if they are unsure of something regarding a medication.29

Peer Reviewed
A medical or other scientific journal (magazine), printed and/or published online, where the articles are validated (vetted) by several scientists or other experts (the reviewers) who work in the same field(s) the journal covers, and that of the submitted paper’s authors - i.e. their peers. The reviewers provide feedback on the article and tell the journal’s editors if they think the study is any good or not. It’s not a perfect system, but it’s the best we have available.
peer reviewed
{$:Peer Reviewed}
peer-reviewed
{$:Peer Reviewed}
Peer reviewed
{$:Peer Reviewed}
Peer-reviewed
{$:Peer Reviewed}
Peer-Reviewed
{$:Peer Reviewed}
peer review
{$:Peer Reviewed}
peer-review
{$:Peer Reviewed}
Peer review
{$:Peer Reviewed}
Peer-review
{$:Peer Reviewed}
Peer-Review
{$:Peer Reviewed}
Peer Review
{$:Peer Reviewed}

Person First Language
A means of self-identifying and describing people who don’t fit the societal norm in such a way that you must drive a Prius and think putting your groceries in an expensive bag made of recycled hemp is going to save the world, right? Just read the Wikipedia definition and try not to spench and/or laugh.
If people put the the same amount of energy into not assuming every mass murder was done by some nutjob like me instead of analyzing the order of words that come out of someone’s mouth, the stigma of having brain cooties would be less than a tenth of what it is today.

PET
Positron Emission Tomography. Think of it as an expensive MRI that’s in color, without the loud magnets. It’s far less harmful than CAT, in spite of your being injected with a radioactive isotope. Unless you’re allergic to some of the other stuff in the injection. Not as pretty as SPECT.

Pharmacodynamics
What a drug does and how it does it. This is mostly, but not entirely concerned with its mechanism of action - what it does to treat whatever condition you have.
A drug’s PD can be simple, like Lexapro’s, or it can be complex, like Zonegran or Saphris, which can best be summed up as “What do Zonegran and Saphris not do?”

Cf. Mechanism of Action. For more information see the Pharmacodynamics Page.

pharmacodynamics
What a drug does and how it does it. This is mostly, but not entirely concerned with its mechanism of action - what it does to treat whatever condition you have.
A drug’s PD can be simple, like Lexapro’s, or it can be complex, like Zonegran or Saphris, which can best be summed up as “What do Zonegran and Saphris not do?”

Pharmaceutical Salt
A created to make the freebase of a drug easier, or even safer, to take, or otherwise affect the pharmacokinetics.

After you pour some hydrochloric acid into freebase paroxetine you get Paxil (paroxetine Hcl). But pour methanesulfonic acid into freebase paroxetine and you’ll get Pexeva (paroxetine mesylate).
Does it make a difference? The FDA says, “No.” As far as crazy meds are concerned, they’re wrong again.

Pharmaceutical salt
{$:Pharmaceutical Salt}
pharmaceutical salt
{$:Pharmaceutical Salt}
Pharmaceutical Salts
{$:Pharmaceutical Salt}
Pharmaceutical salts
{$:Pharmaceutical Salt}
pharmaceutical salts
{$:Pharmaceutical Salt}

Pharmacokinetics
How a drug is distributed through, then eliminated from your body.
pharmacokinetics
How a drug is distributed through, then eliminated from your body.

Pharm Rep
Pharmaceutical sales Representative. Someone who visits doctors to leave lots of samples, pamphlets and, before it was illegal, tchotchkes (swag) promoting their company’s latest and greatest drugs.

They also leave information on conferences sponsored by their company and held near all those highly-esteemed research facilities in Maui, Orlando, Aspen, and other places I can never find in PubMed.
What cheerleaders grow up to be.30

Pharmrep
{$:Pharm Rep}
pharm rep
{$:Pharm Rep}
Pharm rep
{$:Pharm Rep}
pharmrep
{$:Pharm Rep}
Pharmreps
{$:Pharm Rep}
pharm reps
{$:Pharm Rep}
pharmreps
{$:Pharm Rep}
Pharm reps
{$:Pharm Rep}
Pharm Reps
{$:Pharm Rep}
Photosensitivity
As a side effect this has nothing to do with your eyes. It’s all about your skin. Photosensitivity means you’ll get a sunburn if you go outside on a sunny day without two layers of clothing and sunscreen. Antiepileptic drugs, especially Tegretol / Equetro (carbamazepine), and antipsychotics are the most likely to cause this. And St. John’s wort.

Physician Information
Prescribing Information - in the US and Australia. In South Africa it stands for Package Insert. In the US prior to 2010 there was no fixed meaning for the initials PI.
physician information
Prescribing Information - in the US and Australia. In South Africa it stands for Package Insert. In the US prior to 2010 there was no fixed meaning for the initials PI.
Physician information
Prescribing Information - in the US and Australia. In South Africa it stands for Package Insert. In the US prior to 2010 there was no fixed meaning for the initials PI.

PI
Prescribing Information - in the US and Australia. In South Africa it stands for Package Insert. In the US prior to 2010 there was no fixed meaning for the initials PI.

Sort of. Like South Africa, the FDA uses the term “package insert,” but they prefer their own term of “labels” and “labeling information.” Because they (the FDA) are special.
In front of “Leaflet” they usually mean “Patient Information.” In front of “sheet” or “literature” the “I” almost always stood for “Information.”
The P could have stood for “Prescribing,” or “Patient,” or “Physician,” or “Product.” In the US PI has also stood for Package Insert.
It’s used on Crazymeds to mean Prescribing Information regardless of country of origin.
See this page on how to read our drug guides for a detailed translation and explanation of these particular initialisms & acronyms for more information.

PIs
Prescribing Information - in the US and Australia. In South Africa it stands for Package Insert. In the US prior to 2010 there was no fixed meaning for the initials PI.

PIL
Patient Information Leaflet/Literature. A shorter version of the prescribing information (PI) with less doctorese. The PIL, along with the PI, is copied word-for-word by sites like WebMd and all the sites they own (eMedicineHealth, RxList, Medscape, MedicineNet), MedLine Plus, DailyMed, and anywhere that offers “FDA-approved” information, like NAMBLA.org NAMI.org, displayed in different formats from the ones that appear on the drug’s owner’s site, and sold to consumers as something special. On some sites either or both of the PIL and PI is most, if not all, of the information they provide about a medication.28

See this page on how to read our drug guides for a detailed translation and explanation of these particular initialisms & acronyms for more information.

PiL
Public Image Ltd. John Lydon’s (Johnny Rotten) band after the Sex Pistols. As literally “post-punk” as you can get without sounding like anything in that genre.

PI Sheet
Prescribing Information - in the US and Australia. In South Africa it stands for Package Insert. In the US prior to 2010 there was no fixed meaning for the initials PI.
PI Sheet
Prescribing Information - in the US and Australia. In South Africa it stands for Package Insert. In the US prior to 2010 there was no fixed meaning for the initials PI.
PI sheet
Prescribing Information - in the US and Australia. In South Africa it stands for Package Insert. In the US prior to 2010 there was no fixed meaning for the initials PI.
PI sheets
Prescribing Information - in the US and Australia. In South Africa it stands for Package Insert. In the US prior to 2010 there was no fixed meaning for the initials PI.
PI Sheets
Prescribing Information - in the US and Australia. In South Africa it stands for Package Insert. In the US prior to 2010 there was no fixed meaning for the initials PI.

PK
How a drug is distributed through, then eliminated from your body.

The former is incredibly important when it comes to a drug’s potency, efficacy, and determining if a generic drug really is the equivalent to the brand name version;
the latter is all anyone seems to care about.
See the Pharmacokinetics Page for more information.

PMDD
Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder. Think supersized PMS. But worse.

Poop Out
When a drug, usually an antidepressant, suddenly stops working. The medical term for this is tachyphylaxis.
poop-out
{$:Poop Out}
Poop-out
{$:Poop Out}
poop out
{$:Poop Out}
Poop out
{$:Poop Out}
Poop-Out
{$:Poop Out}
Poop Out
{$:Poop Out}
poops-out
{$:Poop Out}
Poops-out
{$:Poop Out}
poops out
{$:Poop Out}
Poops out
{$:Poop Out}
Poops-Out
{$:Poop Out}
Poops Out
{$:Poop Out}
pooped-out
{$:Poop Out}
Pooped-out
{$:Poop Out}
pooped out
{$:Poop Out}
Pooped out
{$:Poop Out}
Pooped-Out
{$:Poop Out}
Pooped Out
{$:Poop Out}

PPO
Preferred or Participating Provider Organization - an insurance plan where you get to choose your doctors, pharmacists, etc. from a list your employer or insurance company supplies you list.

When you see a doctor you pay a random-seeming amount based on deductible, in or out of network, phase of the moon, etc. The only thing worse than PPO is HMO.

PRN
As needed. From the Latin pro re nata, which literally means “for the thing born.” The actual meaning is closer to “as the situation arises.”
p.r.n.
As needed. From the Latin pro re nata, which literally means “for the thing born.” The actual meaning is closer to “as the situation arises.”

Prescribing Information
The long, obtuse, doctorese-laden documents that fill the PDR, accompany samples, and, along with patient information literature (PIL, is copied word-for-word by sites like WebMd and all the sites they own (eMedicineHealth, RxList, Medscape, MedicineNet), MedLine Plus, DailyMed, and anywhere that offers “FDA-approved” information, like NAMBLA.org NAMI.org, displayed in different formats from the ones that appear on the drug’s owner’s site, and sold to consumers as something special. On some sites either or both of the PIL and PI is most, if not all, of the information they provide about a medication.28
Prescribing information
{$:Prescribing Information}
prescribing information
{$:Prescribing Information}

Prodrug
Two meanings. The obvious one is describing someone or something in favor of using drugs. That’s usually the meaning when the term is hyphenated.

In the context of meds a prodrug is an otherwise inert (inactive but not useless) ingredient of a pill that is metabolized (transformed, changed) into the drug that actually does something.
Most prodrugs aren’t designed that way, but some, like Vyvanse (lisdexamfetamine dimesylate), are in order to reduce their abuse potential. Cf. Active metabolite.
For more information on metabolization and the like, see the Page on Pharmacokinetics and Metabolism

prodrug
Two meanings. The obvious one is describing someone or something in favor of using drugs. That’s usually the meaning when the term is hyphenated.
pro drug
Two meanings. The obvious one is describing someone or something in favor of using drugs. That’s usually the meaning when the term is hyphenated.
pro-drug
Two meanings. The obvious one is describing someone or something in favor of using drugs. That’s usually the meaning when the term is hyphenated.
prodrugs
Two meanings. The obvious one is describing someone or something in favor of using drugs. That’s usually the meaning when the term is hyphenated.
pro drugs
Two meanings. The obvious one is describing someone or something in favor of using drugs. That’s usually the meaning when the term is hyphenated.
pro-drugs
Two meanings. The obvious one is describing someone or something in favor of using drugs. That’s usually the meaning when the term is hyphenated.
Pro drug
Two meanings. The obvious one is describing someone or something in favor of using drugs. That’s usually the meaning when the term is hyphenated.
Pro-drug
Two meanings. The obvious one is describing someone or something in favor of using drugs. That’s usually the meaning when the term is hyphenated.
Prodrugs
Two meanings. The obvious one is describing someone or something in favor of using drugs. That’s usually the meaning when the term is hyphenated.
Pro drugs
Two meanings. The obvious one is describing someone or something in favor of using drugs. That’s usually the meaning when the term is hyphenated.
Pro-drugs
Two meanings. The obvious one is describing someone or something in favor of using drugs. That’s usually the meaning when the term is hyphenated.
Pro Drug
Two meanings. The obvious one is describing someone or something in favor of using drugs. That’s usually the meaning when the term is hyphenated.
Pro-Drug
Two meanings. The obvious one is describing someone or something in favor of using drugs. That’s usually the meaning when the term is hyphenated.
Pro Drugs
Two meanings. The obvious one is describing someone or something in favor of using drugs. That’s usually the meaning when the term is hyphenated.
Pro-Drugs
Two meanings. The obvious one is describing someone or something in favor of using drugs. That’s usually the meaning when the term is hyphenated.

Pseudobulbar Affect
(PBA) Emotional incontinence in doctorese.

PTSD
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. Part of the alphabet soup of Anxiety Spectrum Disorders. Subtypes include Combat PTSD and Complex PTSD.
Pyrexia
Persistent fever.

q
every, once. From the Latin quaque, each. Hence -
Q
every, once. From the Latin quaque, each. Hence -

q.h.
Every hour. From quaque hora.
QH

q4h
Every 4 hours
Q4H
Every 4 hours

q6h
Every 6 hours etc.
Q6H
Every 6 hours etc.

q.a.m.
Every/once per morning. From quaque die ante meridiem.
QAM
{$:q.a.m.}

q.d.
Every/once per day. From quaque die.
QD
{$:q.d.}

q.h.s.
At bedtime. From quaque hora somni.
QHS
{$:q.h.s.}

q.o.d.
Every other day.
QOD
{$:q.o.d.}

Qdoc
Quack doctor. An incompetent or fraudulent doctor, therapist, etc. Used mostly on sites with a healthy amount of snark, like Crazymeds and Crazyboards.31

A neologism derived from Pdoc.

q.i.d.
Four times a day. From quater in die.
QID
{$:q.i.d.}

QTP
quetiapine Generic for Seroquel

Rapid Cycling
In bipolar disorder - having four or more mood swings (episodes), with or without periods of remission in between, a year.

I think that makes 80% of the bipolar who read this site rapid cyclers. Cf. Ultradian Cycling.

Rapid Cycling
{:$Rapid Cycling}
Rapid cycling
{:$Rapid Cycling}
rapid cycling
{:$Rapid Cycling}

RC
Rapid Cycling. In bipolar disorder - having four or more mood swings (episodes), with or without periods of remission in between, a year.

I think that makes 80% of the bipolar who read this site rapid cyclers. Cf. Ultradian Cycling.

Receptor
In the context of how meds work/what your brain does, a short-lived bit of your brain’s communication system created by a neuron so it can pick up the messages other neurons send to it.

For more on neurotransmitters, receptors and the like, see the page on Pharmacodynamics.

Receptors
In the context of how meds work/what your brain does, a short-lived bit of your brain’s communication system created by a neuron so it can pick up the messages other neurons send to it.
receptors
In the context of how meds work/what your brain does, a short-lived bit of your brain’s communication system created by a neuron so it can pick up the messages other neurons send to it.
receptor
In the context of how meds work/what your brain does, a short-lived bit of your brain’s communication system created by a neuron so it can pick up the messages other neurons send to it.

Remission
No longer having symptoms. With or without meds. For how long depends on the condition, the person and the doctor. Also: In remission.
remission
{:$Remission}
Renal Calculus
When your kidneys have to work out the equations … No, in this case “calculus” means “pebble.” This is doctorese for kidney stones and whatever other accumulated mineral solids your urinary system transports from your kidneys to the toilet. Topamax and Zonegran are the crazy meds with the highest rates of this side effect. I can tell you from experience, take enough Topamax for long enough and you’ll pass something. In my case that’s at least once a month.

RIS
risperidone Generic for Risperdal

risperidal
A common conflation of Risperdal and risperidone

rTMS
Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation. Also rTMS for repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation.
Part ECT and part MRI, TMS sounds like quackery but it works well enough to be FDA-approved to treat depression.

Rx
Prescription. From the Latin recipio for “take.” The source of the neologisms Dx, Hx, Sx, and Tx.

SAD
Seasonal Affective Disorder.
Also Social Anxiety Disorder, depending upon context.

Samples
Packages of drugs with maybe a week’s worth of doses left with doctors by pharm reps to encourage doctors to prescribe them.

The idea is for your doctor to give you a sample pack along with a prescription. If you like the new med, you fill the prescription. If not, you get a refill of your existing med.
This assumes you live in the pharm reps’ fantasy world where no patient takes more than one medication,
there is no drug-drug interaction with what you now take and the new med, and you can just completely stop taking your current med without any difficulty.
The great thing about samples is they often let someone who is about run out of meds due to a dosage increase
make those final few days until their shitty insurance lets them get a refill without having to pay the full retail price.

samples
Packages of drugs with maybe a week’s worth of doses left with doctors by pharm reps to encourage doctors to prescribe them.

SAnD
Disambiguation initialism for Social Anxiety Disorder, which is part of the alphabet soup of Anxiety Spectrum Disorders

At least I think it’s an initialism as I’ve never heard “sand”.32
I doubt if anyone actually spells out a lot of these in speech, and they are mostly used to save keystrokes.

S/E
Side Effects.

Serotonin
The vastly more popular name for the neurotransmitter 5-hydroxytryptamine.

With a plethora of receptors and subtypes identified as 5-HT1a to 1-I don’t know, 5-HT2a to 2-again I don’t know, up through 5-HT7. Although there are probably more.
5-HT is involved with so many functions I doubt if the neurotransmitter itself does anything besides carrying instructions between and within neurons.
Also abbreviated 5HT. I haven’t found consensus on subscript for subtypes. For more on neurotransmitters, receptors and the like, see the page on Pharmacodynamics.

serotonin
The vastly more popular name for the neurotransmitter 5-hydroxytryptamine.

SERT
Serotonin transporter.
For more on neurotransmitters, receptors and the like, see the page on Pharmacodynamics.

SGA
Second-Generation Antipsychotic. The new term for atypical antipsychotics like Risperdal (risperidone) and Zyprexa (olanzapine).

SH
Self Harm. Less ambiguous, and less popular than SI to describe self injury. Used more than any other alternative to SI.

SI
Self Injury or Suicidal Ideation depending upon context.

Self injury is the most-used term to describe intentionally hurting yourself with by cutting, burning, etc.
Suicidal ideation is when you can’t stop thinking about how you would go about killing yourself.

SIB
Self-Injurious Behavior - a less-used disambiguation term for self injury.

sl
sublingual. Under the tongue.

SLE
Systemic Lupus Erythematous

SMB
Self-Mutilative Behavior - an infrequently-used variant of Self-Injurious Behavior (SIB).

SNRI
Serotonin and Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitor class of antidepressants. Cf. NSRI and SSRI.

SP
Simple Partial (seizure). Also over 200 others.
Somnolence
Sleepy. More so than usual.

SPC
Summary of Product Characteristics. Commie UnAmerican Overseas equivalent of Prescribing Information (PI). See this page on how to read our drug guides for a detailed translation and explanation of these particular initialisms & acronyms for more information.
SPCs
Summary of Product Characteristics. Commie UnAmerican Overseas equivalent of Prescribing Information (PI). See this page on how to read our drug guides for a detailed translation and explanation of these particular initialisms & acronyms for more information.

SPECT
Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography - a brain scan that is much prettier and way more expensive than PET, MRI and CAT. Combined.

Although you’re injected with a radioactive isotope, it’s still far less harmful than CAT. Unless you’re allergic to some of the other stuff in the injection.

Spench
Slang for vomiting or any other forceful and involuntary expulsion of bodily fluids.

spench:Slang for vomiting or any other forceful and involuntary expulsion of bodily fluids. spenches:Slang for vomiting or any other forceful and involuntary expulsion of bodily fluids. spenched:Slang for vomiting or any other forceful and involuntary expulsion of bodily fluids. spenching:Slang for vomiting or any other forceful and involuntary expulsion of bodily fluids. Spenches:Slang for vomiting or any other forceful and involuntary expulsion of bodily fluids. Spenched:Slang for vomiting or any other forceful and involuntary expulsion of bodily fluids. Spenching:Slang for vomiting or any other forceful and involuntary expulsion of bodily fluids.

SR
Sustained Release

SSA
Social Security Administration.

SSDI
Social Security Disability Insurance - SSDI recipients are considered “insured” because they have worked for a certain number of years and have made contributions to the Social Security trust fund in the form of FICA Social Security taxes.

SSDI candidates must be younger than 65 and have earned a certain number of “work credits.You also must have a medical condition that meets the SSA’s definition of disability.
SSDI benefits are eligible only to those with a severe, long-term, total disability.
For more about SSDI see our article on applying for SSDI or SSI when you’re mentally interesting.

SSI
Supplemental Security Income - a program that is strictly need-based, according to income and assets. Work credits & history, etc. does not apply for SSI, which is funded by general fund taxes.

For more about SSI see our article on applying for SSDI or SSI when you’re mentally interesting.

SSRI
Serotonin-Selective Reuptake Inhibitor class of antidepressants. Much more accurate and grammatically correct than Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor.

Cf. NSRI and SNRI.

Standard Antipsychotic
A retronym for first-generation antipsychotics (FGAs) to distinguish them from atypical antipsychotics (AAPs) / second-generation APs (SGAs). AKA Typical AP and Conventional AP.
Standard antipsychotic
{$:Standard Antipsychotic}
standard antipsychotic
{$:Standard Antipsychotic}
Standard Antipsychotics
{$:Standard Antipsychotic}
Standard antipsychotics
{$:Standard Antipsychotic}
standard antipsychotics
{$:Standard Antipsychotic}

Stupamax
A nickname for Topamax. Because it makes you feel really stoooopid. Cf. Dopamax
stupamax
A nickname for Topamax. Because it makes you feel really stoooopid. Cf. Dopamax

Sublingual
Under the tongue.

Sucks Donkey Dong
Really fucking awful. I can’t remember where I got that, as 2002–2003 is a fairly hazy time in my life.
Sucks donkey dong
{$:Sucks Donkey Dong}
sucks donkey dong
{$:Sucks Donkey Dong}
Suck Donkey Dong
{$:Sucks Donkey Dong}
Suck donkey dong
{$:Sucks Donkey Dong}
suck donkey dong
{$:Sucks Donkey Dong}

Sucks Syphilitic Donkey Dong
Because some things suck more than sucking regular donkey dong.
Sucks syphilitic donkey dong
{$:Sucks SyphiliticDonkey Dong}
sucks syphilitic donkey dong
{$:Sucks SyphiliticDonkey Dong}
Suck Syphilitic Donkey Dong
{$:Sucks SyphiliticDonkey Dong}
Suck syphilitic donkey dong
{$:Sucks SyphiliticDonkey Dong}
suck syphilitic donkey dong
{$:Sucks SyphiliticDonkey Dong}
SUD
Substance Use Disorder. Because we need a three-letter initialism for everything.

Supermodel Drug
A term coined at Crazymeds to describe meds like Topamax and Zonegran. I.e. they make you skinny and stupid.
Supermodel drug
{$:Supermodel Drug}
supermodel drug
{$:Supermodel Drug}
Supermodel Drugs
{$:Supermodel Drug}
Supermodel drugs
{$:Supermodel Drug}
supermodel drugs
{$:Supermodel Drug}

supp
Suppository33. You really don’t want to get this confused with the next one…

susp
Suspension, which is what the orally-taken liquid form of most meds is called.

Sx
Symptoms. A neologism of sorts based on Rx.

syr
Syrup

tab
Tablet. A pill, not a type of computer.

Tachyphylaxis
Doctor-speak for poop-out, when a drug, usually an antidepressant, suddenly stops working.
tachyphylaxis

Target Dosage
The amount of a medication your doctor plans for you to take. At Crazymeds we think the target dosage of most meds is the same - however much you’re taking whenever your symptoms stop.
Target Dosage
Target Dosages
Target dosage
Target dosages
target dosage
target dosages
Taste Perversion
When medication makes food taste different. The crazy meds this is most likely to happen with are Topamax, where carbonated beverages may taste awful, and lithium, where food may acquire a metallic and/or salty taste. How foods taste will vary from person to person, those are just the popular variants.

TBI
Traumatic Brain Injury

TCA
Tricyclic Antidepressant or Tetracyclic Antidepressant

TD
Tardive Dyskinesia, an uncommon, but nasty movement-disorder side effect of APs. Cf. EPS.

Tdoc
Therapist. A neologism derived from Pdoc.

TeCA
Tetracyclic Antidepressant. Not used all that often.

TGA
Third-Generation Antipsychotic. The term for a specific type of ‘atypical’ antipsychotic like Abilify (aripiprazole) that is a partial agonist of a dopamine receptor
- usually at D2 - in addition to having the usual properties of an SGA.

The Literature
Shorthand for all the stuff you can find on PubMed, Google Scholar, actual books, and so forth. See this site’s general bibliography for an idea. When it comes to articles published in peer-reviewed journals20, there is a hierarchy of credibility / importance when it comes to the value of what was studied21. Except for letters they all follow the same general format22 In ascending order they are:
The literature
Shorthand for all the stuff you can find on PubMed, Google Scholar, actual books, and so forth. See this site’s general bibliography for an idea. When it comes to articles published in peer-reviewed journals20, there is a hierarchy of credibility / importance when it comes to the value of what was studied21. Except for letters they all follow the same general format22 In ascending order they are:
the literature
Shorthand for all the stuff you can find on PubMed, Google Scholar, actual books, and so forth. See this site’s general bibliography for an idea. When it comes to articles published in peer-reviewed journals20, there is a hierarchy of credibility / importance when it comes to the value of what was studied21. Except for letters they all follow the same general format22 In ascending order they are:

TIA
Transient Ischemic Attack. In English - a ‘minor’ stroke that lasts about 24 hours.

t.i.d.
Three times per day. From ter in die.
TID
{$:t.i.d.}

Titrate
To increase the dosage of a drug, usually as part of a schedule or other planned way.
titrate
To increase the dosage of a drug, usually as part of a schedule or other planned way.
titrates
To increase the dosage of a drug, usually as part of a schedule or other planned way.
titrated
To increase the dosage of a drug, usually as part of a schedule or other planned way.
titrating
To increase the dosage of a drug, usually as part of a schedule or other planned way.
Titrates
To increase the dosage of a drug, usually as part of a schedule or other planned way.
Titrated
To increase the dosage of a drug, usually as part of a schedule or other planned way.
Titrating
To increase the dosage of a drug, usually as part of a schedule or other planned way.

Titration
The plan of how to go from the initial amount of a med you take until you reach its target dosage.
Most PI Sheets have the med’s titration.
titration
The plan of how to go from the initial amount of a med you take until you reach its target dosage.
Most PI Sheets have the med’s titration.
titrations
The plan of how to go from the initial amount of a med you take until you reach its target dosage.
Most PI Sheets have the med’s titration.
Titrations
The plan of how to go from the initial amount of a med you take until you reach its target dosage.
Most PI Sheets have the med’s titration.

TitrationSchedule
The plan of how to go from the initial amount of a med you take until you reach its target dosage.
Most PI Sheets have the med’s titration.
Titration Schedule
The plan of how to go from the initial amount of a med you take until you reach its target dosage.
Most PI Sheets have the med’s titration.
Titration schedule
The plan of how to go from the initial amount of a med you take until you reach its target dosage.
Most PI Sheets have the med’s titration.
titration schedule
The plan of how to go from the initial amount of a med you take until you reach its target dosage.
Most PI Sheets have the med’s titration.
Titration Schedules
The plan of how to go from the initial amount of a med you take until you reach its target dosage.
Most PI Sheets have the med’s titration.
Titration schedules
The plan of how to go from the initial amount of a med you take until you reach its target dosage.
Most PI Sheets have the med’s titration.
titration schedules
The plan of how to go from the initial amount of a med you take until you reach its target dosage.
Most PI Sheets have the med’s titration.

TLE
Temporal Lobe Epilepsy. The only form of epilepsy I’m aware that is both common enough and works well as an initialism that is assumed to be understood.

TMJ
Temporomandibular Joint. The TMJ connects your jaw to the side of your head.
TMJ is also used for TMJ disorder/dysfunction/syndrome and related conditions, like teeth grinding (bruxism), that Lexapro is notorious for having as side effects.

TMS
Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation. Also rTMS for repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation.
Part ECT and part MRI, TMS sounds like quackery but it works well enough to be FDA-approved to treat depression.

Topomax
Common misspelling of Topamax that is popular among the bi-polor.
topomax
Common misspelling of Topamax that is popular among the bi-polor.

TPM
topiramate Generic for Topamax

Trade Name
Commie UnAmerican Overseas equivalent of “brand name.” Cf. International Nonproprietary Name
Trade name
trade name
Trade Names
Trade names
trade names

Transporter
You know how there are all these ADs called “reuptake inhibitors”? The transporter is a part of a neuron that does the reuptaking of the neurotransmitters.

We’re trying to make all this brain crap less magical than the thingy on Star Trek.
For more on neurotransmitters, receptors and the like, see the page on Pharmacodynamics.

transporter
You know how there are all these ADs called “reuptake inhibitors”? The transporter is a part of a neuron that does the reuptaking of the neurotransmitters.
transporters
You know how there are all these ADs called “reuptake inhibitors”? The transporter is a part of a neuron that does the reuptaking of the neurotransmitters.
Transporters
You know how there are all these ADs called “reuptake inhibitors”? The transporter is a part of a neuron that does the reuptaking of the neurotransmitters.

TRD
Treatment-Resistant Depression. In theory you could prepend TR for “Treatment-Resistant” to any condition,

but outside of The Literature TRD is the only instance of the TR initialism I’ve seen used with the meaning assumed to be understood.

Trigger
Something that could or has caused someone to experience a PTSD flashback or other PTSD symptoms.

The term can apply to other conditions (strobe lights trigger epileptic seizures, e.g.), but “triggering” used by itself on consumer/peer-oriented brain cooties sites usually refers to PTSD.

triggering
Something that could or has caused someone to experience a PTSD flashback or other PTSD symptoms.
triggers
Something that could or has caused someone to experience a PTSD flashback or other PTSD symptoms.
trigger
Something that could or has caused someone to experience a PTSD flashback or other PTSD symptoms.
Triggering
Something that could or has caused someone to experience a PTSD flashback or other PTSD symptoms.
Triggers
Something that could or has caused someone to experience a PTSD flashback or other PTSD symptoms.

t.w.
twice a week
TW
{$:t.w.}

Tx
Treatment, therapy. A neologism of sorts derived from Rx.

Typical Antipsychotic
A retronym for first-generation antipsychotics (FGAs) to distinguish them from atypical antipsychotics (AAPs) / second-generation APs (SGAs). AKA Standard AP and Conventional AP.
Typical antipsychotic
{$:Typical Antipsychotic}
typical antipsychotic
{$:Typical Antipsychotic}
Typical Antipsychotics
{$:Typical Antipsychotic}
Typical antipsychotics
{$:Typical Antipsychotic}
typical antipsychotics
{$:Typical Antipsychotic}

Uberspazz
Someone with the trifecta of epilepsy, bipolar, and autism.
All three conditions are noted for causing paradoxical reactions to medications, so having all three means you can expect completely random and nonsensical results from some many most drugs.
uberspazz
Someone with the trifecta of epilepsy, bipolar, and autism.
All three conditions are noted for causing paradoxical reactions to medications, so having all three means you can expect completely random and nonsensical results from some many most drugs.
uberspazzen
Someone with the trifecta of epilepsy, bipolar, and autism.
All three conditions are noted for causing paradoxical reactions to medications, so having all three means you can expect completely random and nonsensical results from some many most drugs.
Uberspazzen
Someone with the trifecta of epilepsy, bipolar, and autism.
All three conditions are noted for causing paradoxical reactions to medications, so having all three means you can expect completely random and nonsensical results from some many most drugs.

UC
Take your pick of Ultradian cycling, Ultradian rapid Cycling, or Ultra-rapid Cycling. They all mean the same thing:

In bipolar disorder - having several severe mood swings (episodes) a day. Even an hour. Often on the tripolar axes of manic-mixed-depressed.
Also another way of saying, “You’re fucked.” because while it’s possible to put an end to ultradian cycling34,
the odds of getting all of your bipolar symptoms completely under control are pretty bad. Cf. Rapid Cycling.

u.d.
as directed. From the Latin ut dictum.
UD
{:$u.d.}

UGT
Uridine 5′-diphospho-GlucuronosylTransferase. AKA UDP-GlucuronosylTransferase. AKA the liver’s garbage collector.
Some meds, like Lamictal are initially metabolized by UGT, a chemical reaction called glucuronidation.
Practically all crazy meds go through glucuronidation just before moving to your kidneys and/or large intestine for a proper goldfish burial.
See this page for a list of drugs initially metabolized by UGT enzymes. Cf. CYP 450 enzymes.
For more information on UGT enzymes and the like, see the Page on Pharmacokinetics and Metabolism.
UGT1A1
{:$UGT}
UGT1A3
{:$UGT}
UGT1A4
{:$UGT}
UGT1A6
{:$UGT}
UGT1A8
{:$UGT}
UGT1A9
{:$UGT}
UGT1A10
{:$UGT}
UGT2B4
{:$UGT}
UGT2B7
{:$UGT}
UGT2B15
{:$UGT}
UGT 1A1
{:$UGT}
UGT 1A3
{:$UGT}
UGT 1A4
{:$UGT}
UGT 1A6
{:$UGT}
UGT 1A8
{:$UGT}
UGT 1A9
{:$UGT}
UGT 1A10
{:$UGT}
UGT 2B4
{:$UGT}
UGT 2B7
{:$UGT}
UGT 2B15
{:$UGT}

UltradianCycling
In bipolar disorder - having several severe mood swings (episodes) a day. Even an hour. Often on the tripolar axes of manic-mixed-depressed.
Also another way of saying, “You’re fucked.” because while it’s possible to put an end to ultradian cycling34,
the odds of getting all of your bipolar symptoms completely under control are pretty bad. Cf. Rapid Cycling.
Ultradian Cycling
{:$UltradianCycling}
Ultradian cycling
{:$UltradianCycling}
ultradian cycling
{:$UltradianCycling}
Ultradian Rapid Cycling
{:$UltradianCycling}
Ultradian rapid cycling
{:$UltradianCycling}
ultradian rapid cycling
{:$UltradianCycling}
Ultra-Rapid Cycling
{:$UltradianCycling}
Ultra-rapid cycling
{:$UltradianCycling}
ultra-rapid cycling
{:$UltradianCycling}

USP
United States Pharmacopeia. When you see USP after a generic name, that’s not a salt of the freebase.

USP is a reference standard for purity and blah, blah, blah.
What it really means is the drug has been around for so long that when doctors originally prescribed it they did so using a traditional Rx, i.e. a recipe,
and pharmacists mixed it with other ingredients listed in the Rx or from their formulary, and made the pills just for you.
USP is the pharmaceutical equivalent of the Good Housekeeping Seal. And about as relevant.

UTI
Urinary Tract Infection. One of the most painful ailments you can get in developed countries.

VNS
Vagus Nerve Stimulator. The original brain pacemaker. Approved to treat epilepsy and depression.

VPA
Valproate, which can mean any or all of valproic acid, sodium valproate, and divalproex sodium.

WBC
white blood cell or white bloodcell count

Whale Shit On The Bottom Of The Ocean
Depressed to the point of being comatose. Whale shit never reaches the bottom of the deep water oceans, so this is about as metaphorical as you can get.35
Whale shit on the bottom of the ocean
{$:Whale Shit On The Bottom Of The Ocean}
whale shit on the bottom of the ocean
{$:Whale Shit On The Bottom Of The Ocean}

XL
eXtended reLease, or maybe eXtra Long? Because spelling things like a moron differentiates one medication from another.

XR
eXtended Release. At least it’s less moronic than XL.

YMMV
Your Mileage May Vary. The CYA phrase derived from car commercials that means “your experience will not necessarily be the same as my experience36

ZIP
ziprasidone Generic for Geodon


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References

  1. Stahl, Stephen M. Stahl’s Essential Psychopharmacology: Neuroscientific Basis and Practical Applications (Essential Psychopharmacology Series) Third edition Cambridge University Press 2008. ISBN:978–0521673761
  2. Julien, Robert M. Ph.D, Claire D. Advokat, and Joseph Comaty Primer of Drug Action: A comprehensive guide to the actions, uses, and side effects of psychoactive drugs 12th edition Worth Publishers 2011. ISBN:978–1429233439
  3. GlobalRPh’s Common Medical Abbreviations
  4. GlobalRPh’s Common Medical Terminology

If you’re under 30 - I Was Online Before You Were Born. Really. Hence the curmudgeonly attitude about all things Internet. You kids have no idea what life was like with two Germanys, Russia controlling over half of Europe for close to half the 20th century, phones being something you didn’t carry around and take pictures with, and TV without The Simpsons(tm). So read the FAQ, RTFM, and let me listen to my cranky grandpa music in peace.


1 If you're looking for free forum software, I highly recommend YaBB. The only reason I don't use it anymore is it can't handle the sheer volume of traffic we get on both the board as well as the entire site. Free software can be awesome, but it does have its limits. If you don't expect to have more than a couple thousand active members and over five thousand visitors every day, check out YaBB.

2 Stressed syllables are normally used, so why LTG? LMT has several meanings, most dealing with lymphoma and leukocytes. LMG is an important gene from the early days of genetic research involving bacteria and fruit flies. You're now that much smarter than your doctor and/or pharmacist. Maybe.

3 Unless you're admitted late Friday night / early Saturday morning. And live alone. And the person at the other end of the one phone number you know never answers. Then that 72 hours can easily stretch to five days. Even though it wasn't crazy like bipolar disorder that was making you act all weird but epilepsy. And the problem of looking crazy went away when you stopped taking a couple meds that lowered your seizure threshold, stopped drinking coffee and stopped smoking. Not a plan I'd recommend for everyone, but if meds are lowering your seizure threshold you have to stop taking them immediately, and I'm lucky in that I can just stop smoking and drinking coffee whenever I have to and only be annoyed. And since I've been taking Topamax I can smoke or not smoke and not care about it one way or the other. Anyway, once you're locked up for being crazy, you're there until the paperwork clears, and under some circumstances that means three business days.

4 The good news about ACTH is a kid usually needs it only once or twice a year. Sometimes more. Rarely anything along the lines of more than one treatment a month. And it often does a decent job at reducing, but not eliminating symptoms. The bad news is the condition is Infantile Spasms, which means you're trying to decide which treatment option sucks less for your baby who isn't even two years old yet. So if you're not the parent of a child with West syndrome, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, or Some Equally Awful syndrome, be grateful that your life is baby pandas crapping rainbows when compared with what some people are dealing with.

5 In the topsy turvy, through the looking glass world of neuropharmacology an agonist is typically a good thing, unlike what Chekov was subjected to in Mirror Mirror. When an agonist enhances a receptor's capabilities it's called "desensitizing." When measuring how well a drug binds to a receptor, essentially its potency, the lower the number the stronger it is. I guess you have to think that way when dealing with an organ that processes visual images upside down and where the left hemisphere controls the movements on the right side of the body and the right hemisphere controls movements on the left side.

6 * I doubt that Merck has much to worry about concerning the brand name Propecia. The only people who would associate it with promoting mange instead of hair growth would be bilingual Greek & English residents of the US, etymology geeks, and people who read Crazymeds.
** Giving a drug a brand name that can't be construed in any way that gives you an idea of what it's supposed to do is an actual requirement and one of the reasons drug names are so fucking bizarre.
*** No, really.
** Cephalon has to have some major pull with the FDA. Provigil = "Promotes Vigilance."
*** And they got their made-up disease of Shift Work Sleep Disorder recognized as real so they could sell more Provigil and Nuvigil (the New Provigil), because there's not that much money in narcolepsy.
*** Is that fucked-up or what?
*** I loved Provigil. Taking it with Strattera was a bad idea, liver-wise, but it sure the hell helped regulate my sleep-wake cycle. I think people who work swing and/or graveyard should be able to get the stuff if they need it, but having to invent a disease just for that?
**** That's a shining example of how messed-up the American Medical Industrial Complex is.

7 While listed as Eli Lilly, and a publicly-traded company, their section of the PDR is in the Ls. Given some the freaky weird side effects of their meds, maybe that should read "It's Mr. Lilly if you're na-a-asty."

8 If you're not reading this page on Crazymeds … it doesn't surprise me in the least.

9 Because opia (όπια) translates to something else entirely. Although it would explain a hell of a lot of doctorese.

10 Although gallows humor makes sense for preferring ED over ER. There has to be a betting pool for which ED has the first guy with both an ED and ED being admitted.

11 I can't fix everything. There are plenty of grammar Nazi sites on teh interwebs. With any luck my overuse of these abbreviations and initialisms will help people learn how to properly use them.

12 If you want to be an even bigger pedantic asshole than I am, use et alii for groups of people who are exclusively male, and et aliae for groups comprised only of females. Since I'm a high school drop-out with a two-year degree from a trade-school, I don't give a shit about all the alumn* variants. You're on your own with those.

13 Ha-ha. I bet I made you all paranoid and look at the FDA's site about radioactive cell phones.

14 These days SGAs are prescribed far more than FGAs in North America, the EU, and other places where people who read this site are likely to live. Which are also places where people have a lot more money for the drug companies make a shitload of money off of.

15 Formulary originally meant the list, and eventually book, of recipes (Rx) and ingredients doctors used when prescribing and pharmacists used when compounding (mixing together) those prescriptions that were made just for you. OK, they made a bunch of the really popular ones ahead of time, and the pharmacists who were the best at guessing how much of which drugs should be made ahead of time went on to start what is now the cartel of Big Pharma. I have a few early 20th century formularies, and it was rather eye-opening to discover how little change there was in the treatment for mania until the 21st century.

16 One forum two fora, one stadium two stadia, one podium two podia (although it's a lectern as often as a podium), one octopus eight octopodes. Putting the ASS in Asperger's since 1965.

17 Yes, I am a pedantic grammar Nazi and linguistic originalist. Good of you to notice.

18 The extreme, nothing but meat and eggs, with bacon for desert, was the actual diet of one child I know. It helped. Fortunately she no longer needs to eat like that. The ketogenic diet is usually, but not always, done for just a few years. And for you kids reading this site who still get bacon for desert: what sort of parents do you have who let you read such filth? If it looks as if the ketogenic diet is in your future forever, it can be probably be a lot less restrictive than even the standard keto diet when you're older.

19 With all the juicy details about meds, like how many clinical trials failed and why. You know, the sort of stuff you need to file a Freedom Of Information Act (FOIA) request to look at. Be prepared to wait a year or longer to get a look at an NDA.

20 While all of The Literature that shows up in PubMed and similar repositories is technically peer reviewed, I find it difficult to take certain publications and their peers seriously. Medical Hypotheses is on the level of the National Enquirer. They're onto something 5% of time, if that. But when they are right, sometimes it can be jaw-droppingly amazing. Complementary Therapies in Medicine and The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine seem to publish anything that 'proves' herbs are good and drugs are bad. While it's true that 99% of the journals in PubMed et al. are biased toward the sort of medicine that involves people who received 10 years of training applying science-based treatments that are as profitable to Big Pharma as all those supplements at GNC are to their manufacturers - who are often subsidiaries of Big Pharma - weren't there a shitload of occupations all over the world regarding how 99% of the people agreeing about some important issue must mean they are right about it?

21 There's a hierarchy of usefulness and credibility as far as I'm concerned. This is my personal rating. I have no idea if there is anything like this in the worlds of scientific research, academia, and wherever else these things are read and used, and, if there is, how the different articles are rated.

22 Research papers have the following components: Abstract - Summary of the article, and is also in the same format. Introduction/Background - The hypothesis; why the study is being done. Methods - How they did it. Results - How it turned out. Discussion - Translating the results to English and/or spinning them to match the hypothesis. I've read a few papers where the results used obtuse statistics and 90% of the discussion was about how the people given the med fit into the confusing stats and nothing about how it helped them, or not, in any way.

23 I'm sure there are people who think meta-analyses are more valuable than an open-label study. They probably publish a lot of meta-analyses.

24 While I've found many reviews to be more useful and, when referencing a couple of multicenter trials, far more accurate than single-blind studies, the fact that far too many reviews are paid for by Big Pharma drops their credibility.

25 In the EU active placebos - older meds used to treat whatever condition the people have - are required for studies. They are being used more often in the US and should be required. What's the point in approving new meds that work better than a placebo? SGAs should work better than Thorazine at a minimum.

26 Based on, I'm almost ashamed to admit, the common support group metaphor "Sometimes you have to kiss a lot of frogs until you meet a prince." Which refers to the process of finding the doctor or therapist who is right for you. Used frequently when someone's prince/princess of a brain cooties professional retired on them. I didn't see the term "Medication merry-go-round" until a few years back.

27 The owner of a drug is not necessarily the manufacturer. They're usually the distributor, but not always. This is something you'll find at the very bottom of the PI, and sometimes the PIL. Hell, Teva doesn't even make the Budeprion XL that got them in so much trouble, it was Impax Laboratories that couldn't make an XL wrapper worth a damn.

28 Which confirms the belief that most people are most comfortable with the familiar. As NAMBLA NAMI says about this sort of thing, "Educate yourself!"

29 It doesn't matter if they look up something in the PDR, look it up on epocrates.com or even on Crazymeds, just as long as they look it up. What is the point of wasting everybody's time if a patient can't take a medication in the first place due to a drug-drug interaction or another condition? If you ask about that sort of thing the only correct answer is, "Double check with the pharmacist." Your doctor should still look up the answer, or at least sound as if they know what they're talking about when they actually answer your question and not blow it off.

30 Don't believe me about cheerleaders growing up to be pharm reps? If googling "pharmaceutical sales representative" cheerleader doesn't convince you, search LinkedIn for cheerleader and a few variations of pharm rep. Hence the references to pharm reps and oral sex fall under the category of Ha-Ha But Serious (pre-Eternal September), or JKSO.

31 I'm pretty sure I coined this term on either bipolar.about.com or Crazymeds. I can't find any evidence of "Qdoc's" use as a satirical abbreviation for quack on any other site prior to 2007.

32 As if someone with social anxiety/avoidance/phobia as bad as mine would actually talk with anyone.

33 Also works well as the definition for 'sup.

34 More accurately: The odds are you'll have to deal with days of ultradian cycling far less often, and they won't be nearly as bad as they used to be. As for the more typical bipolar symptoms, the best you're likely to get is the same: less bad and less often.

35 I picked up this phrase from a conversation I couldn't not hear one night while heading outbound on the 8 Market. "Girlfriend, I don't care if your self-esteem is lower than whaleshit on the bottom of the ocean…"

36 Or, in the words found in numerous posts on every fucking medication-related support group site on teh Interwebs: "We're all different. Finding the right med is always going to be trial and error no matter what." We may all be different sweetie, but most drugs work the exact same way for at least 80% of the people who take them, so it is not always going to be trial and fucking error. Otherwise the FDA may as well approve everything that doesn't kill more that 0.5% of people in the clinical trial of how many people don't die but feel different, and many more doctors would prescribe drugs based upon which pharm rep provides the best oral sex.


Definitions of Neurological, Psychiatric, Medical, and Miscellaneous Terms, Abbreviations, Acronyms & Initialisms used on Crazymeds by is copyright © 2013

Date created: 2 April 2013 at 12:58:30Page Author: Jerod PooreLast modified on 2015–12–18 by JerodPoore.

All drug names are the trademarks of someone else. Look on the appropriate PI sheets or ask Google who the owners are. The way pharmaceutical companies buy each other and swap products like Monopoly™ real estate, the ownership of any trademarks may have changed without my noticing.




Page design and explanatory material by Jerod Poore, copyright © 2003 - 2015. All rights reserved.
Keep up with Crazymeds and and/or my slow descent into irreparable madness boring life. Pick your preferred social media target(s):

Almost all of the material on this site is by Jerod Poore and is copyright © 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, and 2015 Jerod Poore. Except, of course, the PI sheets - those are the property of the drug companies who developed the drugs the sheets are about - and any documents that are written by other people which may be posted to this site will remain the property of the original authors. You cannot reproduce this page or any other material on this site outside of the boundaries of fair use copying without the express permission of the copyright holder. That’s usually me, so just ask first. That means if want to print out a few pages to take to your doctor, therapist, counselor, support group, non-understanding family members or something like that - then that’s OK to just do. Go for it! Please. As long as you include this copyright notice and something along the lines of following disclaimer, I’m usually cool with it.



All rights reserved. No warranty is expressed or implied in this information. Consult one or more doctors and/or pharmacists before taking, or changing how you take any neurological and/or psychiatric medication. Your mileage may vary. What happened to us won’t necessarily happen to you. If you still have questions about a medication or condition that were not answered on any of the pages you read, please ask them on Crazy Talk: the Crazymeds Forum.
The information on Crazymeds pertains to and is intended for adults. While some information about children and adolescents is occasionally presented (e.g. US FDA approvals), pediatric-specific data such as dosages, side effects, off-label applications, etc. are rarely included in the articles on drugs or discussed on the forum. If you are looking for information regarding meds for children you’ll have to go somewhere else. Plus we are big pottymouths and talk about S-E-X a lot.
Know your sources!
Nobody on this site is a doctor, a therapist, or a pharmacist. We don’t portray them either here or on TV. Only doctors can diagnose and treat an illness. While it’s not as bad as it used to be, some doctors still get pissed off by patients who know too much about medications, so tread lightly when and where appropriate. Diagnosing yourself from a website is like defending yourself in court, you suddenly have a fool for a doctor. Don’t be a cyberchondriac, thinking you have every disease you see a website about, or that you’ll get every side effect from every medication1. Self-prescribing is as dangerous as buying meds from fraudulent online pharmacies that promise you medications without prescriptions.
All information on this site has been obtained from the medications’ product information / summary of product characteristic (PI/SPC) sheets and/or medication guides - which is all you get from sites like WebMD, RxList, NAMBLA NAMI, etc., the sources that are referenced throughout the site, our personal experience and the experiences family, friends, and what people have reported on various reputable sites all over teh intergoogles. As such the information presented here is not intended as a substitute for real medical advice from your real doctor, just a compliment to it. You should never, ever, replace what a real doctor tells you with something from a website on the Internet. The farthest you should ever take it is getting a second opinion from another real doctor. Educate yourself - always read the PI/SPC sheet or medication guide/patient information leaflet (PIL) that comes with your medications and never ever throw them away. OK, you can throw away duplicate copies, but keep at least one, as that’s your proof of purchase of having taken a med in case a doctor doubts your medical history. Plus they take up less space than a bottle, although keeping one inside of a pill bottle is even better.
Crazymeds is not responsible for the content of sites we provide links to. We like them, or they’re paid advertisements, or they’re something else we think you should read to help you make an informed decision about a particular med. Sometimes they’re more than one of those things. But what’s on those sites is their business, not ours.
Very little information about visitors to this site is collected or saved. From time to time I look at search terms used and which pages they bring up in an effort to make the information I present more relevant. And the country of origin, just because I’m geeky like that. That’s about it. Depending on how you feel about Schrodinger, our privacy policy should either assuage or exacerbate your paranoia.
Crazymeds is optimized for ridiculously large screens and browsers that don’t block ads. I use Firefox and Chrome, running under Windows 72. On a computer that sits on top of my desk. With a 23 inch monitor. Hey, at least you can make the text larger or smaller by clicking on the + or - buttons in the upper right hand corner. If you have Java enabled. Like 99% of the websites on the planet, Crazymeds is hosted on domain running an open source operating system with a variety of open source applications, including the software used to display what you’ve been reading. As such Crazymeds is not responsible for whatever weird shit your browser does or does not do when you read this site3.
No neurologists, psychiatrists, therapists or pharmacists were harmed in the production of this website. Use only as directed. Void where prohibited. Contains nuts. Certain restrictions may apply. All data are subject to availability. Not available on all mobile devices, in the 12 Galaxies Guiltied to a Zegnatronic Rocket Society, or in all dimensions of reality. Hail Xenu!

‘Everything is true, nothing is permitted.’ - Jerod Poore


1 While there are plenty of books to help you with hypochondria, for some reason there’s not much in the way of websites. Then again, staying off of the Internet is a large part of curing/managing the disorder.

2 Remember kids, Microsloth operating systems are like TOS Star Trek movies with in that every other one sucks way, way more. With TOS Star Trek movies you don’t want to bother watching the odd-numbered ones. With Microsloth OS you don’t want to buy and install the even-numbered ones. Anyone who remembers ME and Vista knows what I mean.

3 Have I mentioned how open source operating systems for commercial applications is one of the dumbest ideas in the history of dumb ideas?* I don’t even need my big-ass rant any more. Heartbleed has made my case for me. And that’s just the one that got all the media attention. The very nature of an open source operating system makes security as much of an illusion as anonymity on teh Intergoogles. Before you flip out too much: the domain Crazymeds is hosted on uses a version of SSL that is not affected by the Heartbleed bug. That’s one of the many reasons why I pay a lot of money and keep this site on Lunarpages.

* Yes, I know I’m using open source browsers. I also test the site using the now-defunct IE and Safari browsers. Their popularity - and superiority - killed IE and Safari, so that’s why I rely on the open source browsers. It’s like brand vs. generic meds. Sometimes the generic is better than the brand.

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